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4.0 out of 5 stars
Calling All Stations
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 22 March 2011
Calling All StationsCalling All StationsCalling All Stations: Hybrid SACD + DVD

To this day i'm still very dissapointed with Tony Banks and Mike Rutherford for pulling the plug on Ray Wilson. Reunion tours and money obviously talks....

" The Dividing Line" is superb, " Shipwrecked" is a magnificent song, as is " Alien Afternoon". " Congo" is brooding yet anthemic. The power of the title track which is also the opener sets the pace perfectly. " There Must be Some Other Way" is Genesis at their best. Ray Wilson's voice is superb all the way through and yes, i also hear the odd similarity to Collins AND Gabriel. The most satisfying thing about this CD is that they stopped pandering to Capital FM/ Radio 1 and got back to making a proper Genesis record. I love some of the Collins era, however i'm sure i'm not alone in thinking that from the late 80's onwards the quality of a lot of the songs went down the pan for the sake of FM radio airplay.

This is an excellent album. Dark, brooding and powerful and musically superb, the very reasons why so many of us got into Genesis, regardless of the era. Easily their best album since 1983's excellent " Genesis".

Brilliant return to form, total travesty that they didn't stick with Ray Wilson.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on 17 September 2002
This is nothing like as good or as bad an album as most of the reviewers on this site make out. If you heard it on the radio and didn't know who it was by, you'd probably rate it above average. Unfortunately, Genesis have spend a quarter of a century generating controversy, from the "I do really look like a fox, don't I?" Gabriel period to those long Dark Ages when the band was little more than a matching tie-and-handkerchief for Phil Collins' solo career. Almost everyone likes one of their creative periods and hates all the others. That means that people bring a lot of baggage along to their first hearing of every new release.
If the band was trying to bring on-side their early-period fanbase (as many have suggested, and the network TV live performance of Supper's Ready Pt. 1 might well serve as Exhibit A for the prosecution) then it must be counted at best a limited success. There are some longer, less pop-inflected songs on here, but sadly these lack something of the structural intricacy and cohesion that attracted the band's initial hardcore following.
And yet too much genuine creativity and care has gone into this work to justify writing it off as a cynical cash-in on famous names. If that was the agenda, they need have taken far less risks and could probably have sold more product in the process. And while Banks and Rutherford might be excused an attempt to live off past glories, the young and talented singer Wilson (ex-Stiltskin) has too much of a stake in the future to play that game.
I think in the balance that this was an honest and sensibly judged attempt to build on the slight return to proggy-ness that has been evident in recent work by younger Brit bands (e.g. Radiohead and more recently Muse (who are all of course in artistic debt to Genesis, King Crimson and so on). And it largely succeeds on its own merits. Just don't approach it with unrealistic expectations that this is the old Genesis reborn, and you may well enjoy it.
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on 8 September 2008
I got into Genesis when 'Duke' was released and immediately bought everything they had recorded ('Wind and Wuthering' was actually THE 1st record i bought, but i did so on the strength of hearing 'Duke'). The next album to be released after 'Duke' was 'Abacab' and its 'Paperlate' E.P. which i loved just as much as any previous Genesis album, and so it was with every subsequent release up to and including 'Calling All Stations.'
Get it?
CAS is just as good as any other Genesis album if you give it a chance, and you may end up like me, not being able to stop playing it, again, just like all the others.
I have often thought about why this is so, and the answer is simple: Banks and Rutherford. They do together what they don't do apart.
The B-sides and outtakes are bloody good too!
Ray Wilson is an excellent choice.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 26 February 2006
This album is open demonstration of this new incarnation going through it's formative stages. Finding its way, that's true, but so was "From Genesis to Revelation" and that led to Trespass, Nursery Cryme, Foxtrot etc. Like that album some flashes of brilliance beg the continued effort to develop a mature sound. I just wish this band had been brave enough to ignore the poor responses, and pushed on into a second album - I am convinced it would have moved us away from the Collins rut into a new era of adventure.
Ray Wilson (pity not all reviewers can even get the man's name right) had demonstrated brilliance with Stiltskin, and really did work hard to revive this band. The small amount of the material that benefited from his writing contribution really do show inspiration. As for the stage act, it can be very difficult to generate the energy when you've lost your nouveau pop audience in response to the departure of Mr Predictable pop (Collins), and the original fan-base that had followed the most progressive band in the world have so lost faith that they can't even be bothered to find out what the new blood brings.
The trouble is, Banks and Rutherford had become so used to being so much more brilliant than the Collins myth (there were two excellent post-Gabriel albums, when Hackett's influence prevented Collins' excesses, and Collins himself turned out 2-3 excellent albums before leading both his solo and group careers down the same road) yet so far exceeded by him in both ego and public perception, that they failed to notice when they had finally found a formula to match the excellence of their Gabriel origins. They really should have learnt the lesson from Marillion by opening up fully to the influence of their new member - Hogarth has taken Marillion down new exciting avenues that go from strength to strength, and I feel that Wilson could have done the same for Genesis.
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on 29 November 2011
Not since And Then There Were Three had there been a real Genesis album. Everything from there on was just another Phil Collins dominated pop album. That is not to say that Calling All Stations is a return to the true progressive rock roots of Genesis but this is a return to the musical integrity that this band had in its earlier incarnation, it is a real shame that they did not carry on for at least another album, my guess is that the new lineup would have established a really strong place in fans heart. It is a crime that Ray Wilson was ditched when they decided to get back together for their cash in tour.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 21 February 2000
This album is different from other Genesis albums. It is darker and contains no songs I'd really describe as 'happy'. It is however an excellent album which I recommend you buy.
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on 18 July 2009
I am a big Genesis fan and saw this live on the "calling" tour. It is one of the best albums Genesis has done. What a shame they didnt continue with Ray Wilson and instead bowed down to commercial pressure. Ray Wilsons voice is excellent. Buy it, then buy the first two Ray Wilson albums, His first album "changes" shows you what Genesis missed out on.........
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on 3 June 2010
it took a couple of listens, but i love this album. its a proper genesis record. i love ray wilsons voice and the songs are all very strong, not a duffer among them. cant understand why it didnt sell better! perhaps everyone was used to the pop laden singles sound that came before in the 80,s and 90,s. dont be put off by the critics, this is a fine album.
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on 25 August 2009
No this album doesn't grab you at first, but I'm not sure
genesis albums ever did. It has to be 5 mins plus to
get to me and some of these eventually did,( no, did'nt
like the pop-vacation either ). Whatever,.. genesis have
a back catalog that will outlive them,

amazed there arn't more covers,
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on 20 January 2015
This is the dangerous one to buy. Everyone says don't as bit of a let down without Collins and yet you need it to complete the set. In the end not disappointing. Still got the 80's vibe, which I'm not a big fan of, but still quite edgy and a good occasional listen.
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