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K


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kula Shaker and Music at it's Best! Completely Mesmerising!
This album provides the best in indie-rock along with eastern sitar type music. An interesting hybrid but works amazingly well in this album. Every track has a good part to it. From upbeat rock such as "hey dude" to tracks such as "govinda" and "tattva" as well. Their other album Peasants, pigs& Astronauts is not as good but is still...
Published on 23 Feb 2001

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars I like the idea, sadly it does little for me.
Some people love this album and I won't say they are wrong because for one, opinion is individual and two, I like some of it.
The bad, for me was the mixing of sounds. I just cannot identify with many of the songs. That alone lessens my veiw of the album so if the idea appeals try it out. Tracks like Hey dude are excellent classic rock and are more my bag.
Published on 19 May 2008 by genejoke


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5.0 out of 5 stars Classical Creative traditional rock music woven with India-influence, 21 Feb 2014
By 
Koos "Koos Reitsma" (Groningen, Netherlands) - See all my reviews
This review is from: K (Audio CD)
One morning in 1996 my radio alarm woke me up with a blasting classical guitar riff. I just could hear the words ‘grateful when you’re …’ played by the Dutch 3fm station. In the following weeks I did not hear the song or saw the clip on one of the TV Music channels. Suddenly there was a song with mysterious India influence. I have founded the band: Kula Shaker.

“K” is one of those strongest debut a rock band can have. In 1995 and 1996 British rock music provided an enormous fresh creative breeze in the world of music. Some of the 1996 albums stand like a rock in a bay. “K” is one of those. Some have described “K” as the LSD-driven psychedelic sitar-rock. Then, that is not totally true. It is not LSD driven, it is not a hippy album, it is not psychedelic, it is not sitar. It is just a combination of different styles smoothly put together.

The sitar is there, but it’s not a sitar album. The melloton is there, but it is not a mellotron record. It is still very refreshing to hear the song ‘Govinda’ and ‘Tattva’ starting in slow, mediation-style, to be pulled and mixed into faster rock song. The combination gives “K” the rocking mysterious touch. ‘Hey Dude’, is the outright fast swing-a-long shoutalong rocker. ‘Temple of Everlasting Light’ is the even more Indian-influenced style, but still rockmusic: acoustic guitar with Indian rhythms but heavier sound. ‘Grateful when you’re dead’, I consider it a nod of the head to Peter Green’s Fleetwood Mac ‘Oh well’. Blasting powerful guitar rock in the first part of the song suddenly changed into beautiful more mellow second part.

Not before have I heard or will you hear such a creative mix of traditional rock music with heavy influence from India. It’s a mix of late 60’s rock, Indian themed pop, meditation style influence and straightforward Indierock. Unheard in 1996. At the time considered retro-tastic. Now I consider “K” as classic britrock.
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5.0 out of 5 stars lalalalalala, 16 Jan 2014
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This review is from: K (Audio CD)
more good car tunes will no doubt come into it's own in summer, again a bit of a nostalgia trip ahh but what a good one.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Took me back a few years, 20 April 2013
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This review is from: K (Audio CD)
I had this CD years ago but lost it in the divorce settlement ! Saw Kula Shaker about 16 years ago at Glastonbury and listening to this on a sunny day took me right back there. Thanks Kula Shaker.
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5.0 out of 5 stars replacing a well loved CD, 5 April 2013
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This review is from: K (Audio CD)
I bought this as a replacement for one my son pinched so I knew exactly what I was getting - thanks
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4.0 out of 5 stars Music, 18 Jun 2012
This review is from: K (Audio CD)
A great album from the classic era of 1990's Brit pop and a must for any fan of the era
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sounds like modern Beatles., 4 Oct 2010
By 
Renato Medurecan (Zagreb, Croatia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: K (Audio CD)
When I first listen to this record, I thought we have the new beatles. It seems they have very similar modern sound
according to classic Beatles. Anyway, this is really good album with great rock songs mixed with some progressive Krishna
melodies. Maybe it's a little bit strange record when you listen him for the first time, but after listening it for a
few times, it becomes great and you don't want to take it out from your CD player. Sounds great!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Out of time and still a classic., 14 July 2010
By 
Alister King "Big Al" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: K (Audio CD)
A mixture of classic rock & 60's psychedelia, an obsession with Eastern mysticism, and complete boredom with grunge and indie made this the fastest selling debut since Oasis' Definitely Maybe. Despite this Kula Shaker manage to stamp their own identity over the whole thing and actually succeed in building something spiritual and sensual. Hey Dude opens the album and is a full on rocker. Knight On The Town continues that theme and then Temple Of Everlasting Light acts as a bridge to the sweet spot of the album. Govinda is based around a chant and hypnotises nicely. Tattva is similar but more epic. Weak pun aside Grateful When You're Dead / Jerry Was There acknowledges their roots with appropriate gravitas. Out of time and still a classic.
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5.0 out of 5 stars THEE Top Class Album of the 1990's, 27 April 2010
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This review is from: K (Audio CD)
Okay so what Hayley Mills' Son as lead singer..but what a sound..this is a great purchase
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4.0 out of 5 stars Hidden Gem from the Mid-Nineties, 3 July 2008
This review is from: K (Audio CD)
If a group of people were to start reeling of names of British bands that had hits in the mid-nineties, it would probably be a while before Kula Shaker got a mention, if at all. However, the four piece band fronted by Crispian Mills (son of actress Hayley Mills) released K in 1996 and it became the fastest selling debut album in Britain since Oasis. Despite it's acheivement a decade later it has become a hidden gem of the `Brit-pop' movement.

A mixture of rock and Indian influences bring about a very interesting album and one that should be more well known and appreciated than it sadly is today. Clear influences are felt throughout, especially from The Beatles' later work and The Greatful Dead. Mills' vocals are nothing amazing but they are good throughout and have their really good moments. The band are also well adept, especially using some great guitar riffs and melodies, at times sounding almost like a Jimmi Hendrix tribute act but in a good way. This is a very enjoyable album, and whilst not the first time to mix popular music with an Eastern flavour, it certainly does it in a way that really works.

1. Hey Dude- A fine intro, the drums and guitar kick off and show how the `rockin' side of this album will feel. A very catchy song with interesting lyrics, great guitar work and one of the rare songs where I like the verses more than the chorus.

2. Knight On The Town- Guitars once again lead this song, the main riff opens the tune and slight Indian tones are felt for the first time in this album as well as a prog-rock feel as the track goes on.

3. Temple Of Everlasting Light-A more trippy and Indian song next. I don't like the first half of this but once it builds up and the extra voices kick in then I am fully there even when it mellows back and resumes its semi-trippy vibe.

4. Govinda-This is where we get into full traditional Indian music mode. A surprise hit back in the day, it is the only top ten hit in Britain to be sung entirely in Sanskrit. however, it is very catchy and it certainly rocks out in the second half. This song shows how two styles of music can mix and still be brilliant, the guitars go so well with the beat and the tamboura etc and the public embraced it, even if they didnt know what they were singing.

5. Smart Dogs-We're back with rock, though the vocal melody retains the Indian vibe. Yet another great guitar riff as it whails its way through the track, lyrically it is weak but this song is more about fun than meaningful messages.

6. Magic Theatre-A more mellow track follows. Some people will like this, but i don't really care for it much. I feel it is not only in the wrong place, but it spoils the mood that has been set up by the previous tracks.

7. Into The Deep-Probably my favourite track on the album. I love the piano intro, love the middle eight, love everything about the track.

8. Sleeping Jiva-This is a purely instrumental tune, purely made up of traditional Indian instruments. It's kind of ok but not really my thing, its more of a lead up to the next song but feels slightly too long for it's purpose.

9. Tattva-Another hit here in the UK, this time with English lyrics in the verses. Slightly less catchy than Govinda, but still a really good song.

10. Grateful When You're Dead/Jerry Was There-A clear reference to one of this album's greatest influences. Another great guitar riff leads the song in, good lyrics, a strong vocal perfomance and a catchy `Ba ba baaaaa, ba ba baaaa' in the chorus. This is another fun song. Unfortunately, the second half, a tribute to Jerry Garcia fro the Greatful Dead, is the opposite. It is another slow, trippy track that just plods it way to the end. Nothing exciting here, which is a shame as the first part of this combo is great.

11. 303-Here we have some very cheesy and cliche lyrics and yet the song is catchy, fun and full of energy and life. This song is nothing amazing, but when it comes on it's hardly one to skip. Enjoy it for what it is, don't spend time thinking about the words, especially if you do not like them. Great guitar work throughout though and a very good peformance on the vocals.

12. Start All Over-I really like this track, it must be a bit understated as I always forget about it until it plays. Good lyrics, good performance by the band. There's something missing that prevents it being a great song, but not all dongs need to be great. The song is perfectly placed in the running lost, fits fantastically with the feel and mood that the album bathes itself in.

13. Hollow Man-We close with a slow intro, piano based. This is a lovely gentle two and a half minutes which leads into the songs acoustic guitar and vocals. After a simple song the electric guitars make their final appearance on the album, bringing it to a rocking end, not as catchy as the better songs but still pretty good. There is a thirteen minute silence followed by a brief recording of a holy man speaking about his guru.....not worth the wait.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Find your way home..., 27 May 2008
By 
This review is from: K (Audio CD)
Let's get one thing out of the way - it shouldn't matter whether Crispian Mills is the son of an actress or a comprehensive school dropout who's been on benefits all his life; judge the music on its own merits and leave the inverse snobbery out of it.

"K" is an excellent album, full of feelgood classics. "Hey Dude", "Govinda", "Grateful / Jerry" and "303" are particularly good tracks. OK, there's nothing innovative here, but since when does good music have to be innovative (eg Oasis)? It takes its cues from all the right sounds and melds them into something quite distinctive. A soupcon of early '70s Floyd, a dash of Doors, a bit of early Purple and of course the much-mentioned "eastern mysticism" (which, apart from on "Govinda", doesn't really add much, and in fact threatens to become a bit of a musical albatross at times). The musicianship and production are excellent throughout - especially the trademark swooping bass. And Crispian Mills proves that, just because you're someone famous's son, it doesn't stop you from being a great writer and a great singer.

Highly recommended - a great summer album for anyone who likes classic rock. One criticism is completely justified though - it's probably one of the worst examples of cover art EVER....
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K by Kula Shaker (Audio CD - 2000)
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