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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars an underrated treasure
As some of the reviews clearly show, this album is not well regarded by Who fans in general. And you can see why. It lacks the visceral bombast of the classic 'Who's Next' or the expansive imagination of 'Tommy' or 'Quadraphenia'.

But I have always really enjoyed it. I think it fits far better if considered alongside the two Pete Townshend solo albums that he...
Published on 5 Aug 2006 by Musogeek

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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Listenable but not great by any standard
The bad bits first, well, Kenney Jones drumming. It's adequate, it's not great and it's horribly bland and nondescript. That's really the worst musical pert of this album. The content lacks the bite and angst of Quadrophenia, the smash bang wallop of Who's Next and it's all rather tame.

The good points are, that if you didn't have the previous Who albums to...
Published on 30 Aug 2009 by Comical Engineer


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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars an underrated treasure, 5 Aug 2006
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
As some of the reviews clearly show, this album is not well regarded by Who fans in general. And you can see why. It lacks the visceral bombast of the classic 'Who's Next' or the expansive imagination of 'Tommy' or 'Quadraphenia'.

But I have always really enjoyed it. I think it fits far better if considered alongside the two Pete Townshend solo albums that he released before and after it. It is far more of a piece with 'Empty Glass' and 'All the best cowboys have chinese eyes' than with The Who's golden era.

If you like the introspective and sometimes painfully confessional songwriting of those two albums, then you may find that on Face Dances Townshend reveals his bruised soul (shorn of grand allegories) as on no other record.

A quiet classic.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It is a great album ! Most people seem hard to accept that Keith was gone., 22 Aug 2012
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
Recently i went back to hearing this cd and the more i hear it the more i rediscover how good is. The first song "You Better You Bet" a great hit single that evoques "Pictures of Lily" and mentions the sound of old T-Rex and "Who s' Next"........

The second song "Dont Let Go the Coat", is another winner, could have been a biggest hit but was not; rarely performed live.

"Cache Cache" tells a story when Pete Townshend ended up sleeping with some bears. Never played on stage by The Who, only to be performed once during his 2011 solo tour by Roger. Great song, that uses similar chords to "Let My Love Open the Door".

Next, a John Entwistle penned song: "The Quiet One". The band shows their "heavy side", playing a interesting autobiographical song "I aint quiet everybody else is too loud" shouts John Entwistle about him labeled "the quiet one". Played live by The Who during their 1981/1982 tour, there are some even better versions.

"Did You Steal my money"...The Who like we never did hear them again, sounding like "The Police". Good catche tune, player rarely only during their 1981 english tour.

"How can you do it alone", finds The Who opening this song with similar chords (The Overture from Tommy"). The song is carried by Entwistle s' bass and Roger great voice. It has a great "bridge" in the middle with Kenney Jones doing a great job.

"Daily Records" is amazing. A original Who sounding song. Excellent vocals, guitar, drums, bass, piano. It is perfect in time changes. One overlooked gem ! Never played live.

"You" is the second Entwistle song, and is a absolute winner ! Furious, heavy guitar playin by Pete, and vocals by Roger and John. Sadly never played on stage by The Who. Only the John Entwistle band used to play this song.

"Another Tricky Day"...great song. Entwistle drives the song here along with Kenney Jones drumming. Great vocals by Roger. A live staple at Who shows.

The remixed and remastered version lowers the bass sound particularly in "You Better You Bet". Includes 3 additional studio songs, and the best one is "Somebody Saved Me" later included in a Pete Townshend solo album "All the Best Cowboys have Chinese Eyes".

"The Quiet One" live version here is amazing and "How Can You Do it Alone", is interesting because, it shows the origin of the song.

The problem with this album seems that hard core fans never accepted that Kenney Jones is no Keith Moon. Also the sound given by the production to the drums did not helped. The Who was trying to move away from their tradicional sound, and got the Eagles/Joe Walsh producer, and this was the result.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile purchase, 7 July 2010
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
To be honest I regard Who's Next as their best work, with some of their earlier albums being very good too. However, this post-Keith Moon album has it's charms and if you have several Who albums already it's worth finding a place in your collection for this one.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Review: Face Dances, 30 July 2012
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This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
Simply another classic Who album. Who can forget (no pun intended) You Better, You Bet? And then there are lesser known but excellent songs such as Another Tricky Day and Daily Records to put you in a true WHO frame of mind.
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great album, 29 Jun 2001
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
I never listened to The Who, but my parents had this album so it got into my head. Ten years later, I tried it again and I was amazed. This is a superb album with marvelous guitars and drums. I don't which is my favourite song - they all are... I don't know was any song a big hit (but the album was #2 in UK and #4 in U.S.) but some of them should have been for sure... From the wonderful slower songs like Another Tricky Day and How Can You Do It Alone, to the great guitars like in The Quit One and Daily Recods this album never gets down. Buy it. You won't regret it. I promise!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Moonless, 17 Feb 2007
By 
K. C. Simm "kenart" (Lancashire UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
It says it all, without Moonie. He said praising with a faint damn, this is not a bad album. Let's face it any Townsend penned song has got to be ok, at least. There are some bright moments but it does not have the energy that say Who's Next layers on in abundance. It is without the greatest rock drummer of all time. Keith Moon was dare I say it an essential part of the Who, they were and have been never the same iconoclastic all fireworks rock band. This album is a case in point. I bought it when it first came out on vinyl and I enjoyed a couple of listens and then it was placed at the end of my alphabetically arranged (Iknow) collection and has been aired seldomly since. You can never recover your youth and this album is too safe for the Who. Nice cover though. As an after thought when we are all sitting around in the old folks home will we be singing along to Who are You?
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 12 Nov 2014
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
great CD and another excellent addition to my record collection their music never ages.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Listenable but not great by any standard, 30 Aug 2009
By 
Comical Engineer "comicaleng" (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
The bad bits first, well, Kenney Jones drumming. It's adequate, it's not great and it's horribly bland and nondescript. That's really the worst musical pert of this album. The content lacks the bite and angst of Quadrophenia, the smash bang wallop of Who's Next and it's all rather tame.

The good points are, that if you didn't have the previous Who albums to judge by then this would really be quite respectable. Pete Townsend wrote a collection of more restrained and soul baring tracks for this album, which unfortunately means no anthems, no 5.15, no Pinball Wizard, no Baba O'Reilly and not even a Boris the Spider.

Get past that and this is a well crafted and thoughtful album with a decent collection of songs. It won't blow your head off but it's listenable.
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16 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Losing Face, 31 Jan 2004
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
In the world of rock ‘Hope I die before I get old’ is an oft used refrain from bands wishing to assert the ephemeral nature of their art whilst showing a contemptuous disregard for those who stay around for too long, leaving a burned-out catalogue of mediocrity. Indeed premature mortality for a group or an individual tends to bear a direct correlation with the ultimate longevity of their music. After the tragic death of Keith Moon The Who were reluctant to return to the recording studio. And rightly so, with their place already guaranteed within the pantheon of rock legends what else could they achieve?
Sadly the 1981 release of ‘Face Dances’ confirmed that the remaining three quarters of this seminal rock band could produce a record so trite and misguided that it would indelibly stain all that preceded it. One suspects that even the sudden and permanent elimination of the remaining band members would have done little to improve the reputation of this one! Perhaps the fact that many of their original fans had moved on, resulting in ‘Face Dances’ disappointing chart position (#2 in UK and #4 in U.S) helped save the total deconstruction of the bands myth.
1981’s ‘Face Dances’ was released in the same year as an overweight and over the hill Muhammad Ali climbed through the ropes for the last time to be soundly beaten by the journeyman Trevor Berbick. Whilst it is hard to say which comeback was the more painful, one senses that both occasions possessed an equal measure of desperate witless posturing in front of a shocked public. Whilst both protagonists should have been indulging in the easy life they allowed their delusions to take hold with tragic consequences.
The album ‘Face Dances’ comprises of nine original tracks seven of which were penned by Pete Townshend and two by John Entwistle. At the time of the recording Townshend was beginning to exhibit the same fertile imagination and scope that was later to produce his literally nightmarish concept album ‘Psychoderelict’. In contrast Entwistle’s monstrous chugging rehashes are far less ambitious and as such provide the albums more listenable moments. Tasked with interpretation and delivery Roger Daltrey beseeches the listener with impassioned clichés as he emotes:
“You lead me on like a lamb to the slaughter. Then you act like a fish out of water.”
Desperate stuff indeed!
At less than forty minutes in length ‘Face Dances’ is mercifully short but still manages to inflict a lot of damage on the listener. Having not managed to recapture the vitality of earlier works The Who compensate by reworking the musical styles of contemporary performers whilst pitching in a veritable kitchen sink of characteristic keyboard and guitar refrains. And so the listener is confronted in equal measure by what sounds like sub standard 10cc, The Police and Genesis. Both irrelevant and contrived The Who have served up a half cocked crock of cack.
The Hucknallesque track five asks ‘Did you steal my money?’ Anybody unfortunate enough to have shelled out their hard earned cash for ‘Face Dances’ will know this question to be rhetorical.
Buy it – I dare you.
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars substandard who, 18 Sep 2003
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
All of the who's albums were good apart from the last 2 (face dances and its hard).
While the musicianship is technically proficient on this album the songs in general lack balls - not helped by Kenny Jones robotic drumming. There are only 2 songs worth a hoot on this album - You better you bet and another tricky day. Definitely the who past their best.
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Face Dances
Face Dances by The Who (Audio CD - 1997)
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