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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AN EXCELLENT lLITTLE DISCOVERY..
Now, im not particularly well versed in the area of jazz, but was so swept away in most of these tunes i felt compelled to type a few words.
Wife of the late John Coltrane, Journey was recorded in 1970 and was inspired she says, "from my own beloved spiritual perceptor Swami Satchidananda". Satchindananda apparently means 'knowledge-existence- bliss'. Now, all...
Published on 20 Feb 2004 by Melissa House

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3 of 21 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely horrendous
I cannot understand why so many reviewers consider this to be the zenith of Indian-jazz fusion - this is perhaps the most one-dimensional album I have ever heard. While the technical ability of Pharoah Sanders is clearly immense, much of the percussion is often out of time, and each piece is constructed simply from a double bass riff played ad nauseam, followed by Sanders...
Published on 5 May 2008 by Ms. P. Holmes


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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AN EXCELLENT lLITTLE DISCOVERY.., 20 Feb 2004
By 
Melissa House "melski" (Perth Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Journey In Satchidananda (Audio CD)
Now, im not particularly well versed in the area of jazz, but was so swept away in most of these tunes i felt compelled to type a few words.
Wife of the late John Coltrane, Journey was recorded in 1970 and was inspired she says, "from my own beloved spiritual perceptor Swami Satchidananda". Satchindananda apparently means 'knowledge-existence- bliss'. Now, all ideologies philosophies and transcendental things aside, this is a totally remarkable & quite acessible piece of jazz fusion.
There is a beautiful/ sublime meditative quality achieved through the use of harp, tambourine, bells, a tamboura, (a 4 stringed indian drone instrument which sounds alot like a sitah), spelling?, & an oud (a north African instrument). So theres a heady collision of exotic sounds that puts the album in its own slightly- 'cosmic psycadellic transcendental' sort of a niche. The musicianship is outstanding - im sure those familiar with jazz would probably recognise the contributors such as Pharoe Saunders & alike.
I bought this around the same time as Miles' Bitches Brew, which in comparison is a much more 'difficult' j.fusion/ listen. This has a level of accesability that anyone new to jazz could appreciate/ enjoy; but that in no way undermines its level of accomplishment, which is stunning & sophisticated without being pretentious or tooooo abstract or free form, like her other album Transfiguration.
After youve immersed yourself in this one, then grab Ptah.. a very close second contendor. I cant imagine anywone with an interest in Jazz not gaining pleasure from this. A very classy cd indeed, oh & the packaging for a change is not the standard plastic rubbish, but linstead ike a mini record sleeve with glossy cover & lovely b/w photos inside on decent paper! So yeah, all in all highly reccomended!!
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superlative 70's jazz fusion, 21 April 2000
This review is from: Journey In Satchidananda (Audio CD)
I think Carl Craig said it best when he described Alice Coltrane as a 'woman of rage'. Alice Coltrane was a harp player who, through her husband John, got into jazz fusion. Following on from her husband's obsession with classical Indian music, she made this record which is essentially a combination of deep, intense jazz rhythms and Indian ragas. Focussed and emotional, this record is as deep as your life.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'Holmes' ain't where the heart is, 17 Jun 2009
By 
P. A. Ferguson "Porl!" (Cleckheaton, UK) - See all my reviews
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Unlike one star reviewers who make up what other people have said, I'll let it be known here that no-one has made out that this is the zenith of 'Indian Jazz Fusion', not on this site at any rate. Most of us would agree that this a quite beautiful record and if this kind of laid back reflective jazz is your thing, then you could easily find yourself coming back to it time and time again. It's certainly the kind of record that feels like time has passed without one realising it. It definitely takes you places. Sublime.

But I do agree with one star reviewers that if you DO want an Indian Jazz fusion, then yep, head over to the Shakti section and knock yerself out! Mind you if you want PROPER Indian Jazz fusion...
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Alice at her best, 2 April 2010
This review is from: Journey In Satchidananda (Audio CD)
Sadly Alice Coltrane died not so long ago, I've had this album on vinyl for 40 years and recently moved into the 21st century with the CD version. This album is in my opinion her finest work. Great musicians supporting her mixing eastern and north african sounds to accompany her swirling harp and piano. Bass lines of Cecil McBee run a pulse foundation with the tenpura and Pharoah Sanders soprano sax floats in a free yet disciplined way. This is deeply emotional,spiritual, almost celestial, music that is timeless. and played with control, humility and respect. The album concludes with a "Live" performance that includes Charlie Haden on bass and a musician playing the Oud. The performance is outstanding and really beyond word description,a sense of joy and sadness which to me is truly uplifting.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good, 12 Feb 2005
This review is from: Journey In Satchidananda (Audio CD)
Blissfully florid and loose acoustic jazz sprawl, dominated by sublime, rippling harp and some remarkable saxophone from Pharoah Sanders. A treat for the ears, with lots of small percussion rattling and tinkling and assorted exotic instruments twanging away. Very warm.
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5.0 out of 5 stars MAGICAL, 14 Dec 2013
This review is from: Journey In Satchidananda (Audio CD)
THE FIRST FEW NOTES OF THIS CD LET U KNOW U ARE IN FOR A MAGICAL MUSICAL EXPERIENCE.ALICE NEVER REACHED THIS STANDARD AGAIN AND IS THEREFORE IN MY OPINION HER BEST ALBUM
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5.0 out of 5 stars alice coltrane, 21 Feb 2013
This review is from: Journey In Satchidananda (Audio CD)
Great album, had it on vinyl, then decided to purchase cd, mellow and relaxing, my fave Alice Coltrane album, deff recommend this album
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5.0 out of 5 stars A significant addition to the Coltrane tree, 25 Dec 2012
This review is from: Journey In Satchidananda (Audio CD)
This was recorded in 1970. Five Alice Coltrane compositions led off by 6.35 minutes of "Journey in Satchidananda". It features Pharoah Sanders on soprano sax with Ms Coltrane on harp and piano, Charlie Haden is on bass on most tracks (except for the last live offering of Isis and Osiris). Rashied Ali on drums Vishnu Wood on oud complete the enemble used on the 4 studio tracks. "Journey" sets the tone of eastern influenced jazz. It is almost trance like in its building of layers of improvisation. Both pleasant, and music which gains from close listening. The interactions between instrumentalists is seamless with Ms Coltrane's use of harp and ivories and Pharoah Sanders sax playing a stand out. It is a rewarding journey; enough in the Coltrane mould of experimentation to keep parts on edge and spinning off into the deep here after. A joy to experience.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, 7 Jan 2011
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This review is from: Journey In Satchidananda (Audio CD)
This is a beautiful CD, it has Alice Coltrane's distinctive style along with touches that feel like Miles Davis (Recollections)and John Coltrane and a fusion of Indian music. Great stuff.
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3 of 21 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely horrendous, 5 May 2008
By 
Ms. P. Holmes (uk) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Journey In Satchidananda (Audio CD)
I cannot understand why so many reviewers consider this to be the zenith of Indian-jazz fusion - this is perhaps the most one-dimensional album I have ever heard. While the technical ability of Pharoah Sanders is clearly immense, much of the percussion is often out of time, and each piece is constructed simply from a double bass riff played ad nauseam, followed by Sanders either playing in a major/minor scale over the top. Coltrane's superfluous noodling over the top becomes irritating rather quickly.

When i first heard this album on the samples above, i thought it sounded marvellous. This effect wears off very quickly, i assure you. For proper Indo-jazz fusion, Shakti is infinitely better.
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Journey In Satchidananda
Journey In Satchidananda by Alice Coltrane (Audio CD - 1999)
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