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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'with wasted tears that try to fight in vein'
Back in 1978 Tangerine Dream was at the height of their career. Their beginning 4 albums; Electronic Meditation (1970), Alpha Centauri (1971), Zeit (1972) and Atem (1973) might had been loved by a selected group of unwavering souls of their emerging followers, but placed aside by the majority of overwhelmed listeners. Phoedra (1974), Rubycon (1975), Ricochet (1975),...
Published on 4 Jan 2011 by Deven Gadula

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars a different dream
The first Tangerine Dream album with a live drummer, that suits their style and gives it more of a groove, however, the vocals are a little off putting (that was new too). The last track is the most listenable as it is pure Tangerine Dream, inmstrumental all the way with that classic Edgar Froese sound. For my money, their next album was better by far; Force Majeure.
Published on 2 Aug 2010 by The Pez


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'with wasted tears that try to fight in vein', 4 Jan 2011
By 
Deven Gadula (san francisco, ca, united states) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Cyclone (Audio CD)
Back in 1978 Tangerine Dream was at the height of their career. Their beginning 4 albums; Electronic Meditation (1970), Alpha Centauri (1971), Zeit (1972) and Atem (1973) might had been loved by a selected group of unwavering souls of their emerging followers, but placed aside by the majority of overwhelmed listeners. Phoedra (1974), Rubycon (1975), Ricochet (1975), Stratosfear (1976) and Encore (1977) were all much more accessible and more widely appreciated and heavily reinforced by TD's first soundtrack Sorcerer (1977) they were exposing the band to a much wider public. The golden line-up of TD consisting of Edgar Froese, Christopher Franke and Peter Baumann which lasted 7 years and 9 albums ended prior to the creation of Cyclone. Peter Baumann had left the group to focus on his solo recordings and Steve Jolliffe, an Englishman, had replaced him. My feeling is that Edgar's and Christopher's choice had a lot to do with wanting to experiment with English lyrics and with the meaning behind the lyrics, so paramount to the substance of great progressive rock. Cyclone had become their progressive rock album and it ended up disappointing many followers of Tangerine Dream. I ended up falling in love with the mysterious lyrics of Bent Cold Sidewalk. At first (at fifteen)I was even more enamored by the energy and sound of Rising Runner Missed By Endless Sender with its straightforward lyrics, but I have to say that today I feel differently about this song. When you listen to the following instrumental song Madrigal Meridian, you can hear how much beauty was covered or blurred by the human voice of the preceding two songs. Very likely that realization became obvious to our artists and that was why we seldom heard lyrics again. However, so many of us did not have to wonder anymore of how Tangerine Dream would sound with vocals. Although Alpha Centauri did bring some of them, we could not quite speak of songs. Besides the lyrics Steve Jolliffe added to the sound of Tangerine Dream in terms of increased wind instrument sections. The instrumental part of Bent Cold Sidewalk as well as Madrigal Meridian has some beautiful flute, horns, and clarinet and piccolo sections within them. Madrigal Meridian is a five star song in my book. There is a lot going on here, that's for sure. Pretty consistent up-beat, and the melodic spiral-like motif introduced in the 9th minute on a synthesizer is being picked up by the guitar in the 11th minute. For some listeners of TD Edgar's distorted guitar sound might have damaged the piece but the violin take on that Prokofiev inspired movement in the 13th minute sounds very warm and it continues and transitions the piece in the 17th minute into a slower atmospheric section. In the 19th minute the sound of Steve Jolliffe's flute brings on an cello and violin solo epilogue. However, the most interesting layer of Madrigal Meridian for me is its dramatic experimental sombient atmosphere of 3rd minute and than the phenomenal 8th minute, drum and organ induced. The sound Christopher Franke created the 8th minute sounds similar to the one Richard Barbieri ends Porcupine Tree's phenomenal Fear Of The Blank Planet album 30 years later (I am sorry, that had nothing to do with Tangerine Dream). Again, I can understand that this is hardly anybody's favorite album by Tangerine Dream but it is hard for me to understand why you would not take it for what it is and listen with pleasure to, once a while. Perhaps when you feel like solving a riddle?

Bent Cold Sidewalk is a riddle I only partially understand. Nature is full of Spirit which the cities are lacking. I lose my touch with the Spirit when I stay there. Our civilization brings no answers. We live our human lives focusing on trivia nonsense blurring our vision to push us forward. We wish to stay physically young and we relive memories of our youth in sadness, rather than reaching for our real spiritual destiny. Each incarnation is a key; death destroys the mind but death is not the only entry into the universe of cosmic sound (the universe is full of cosmic sound where all thoughts originate). If you can strengthen your meditative channel you may become exposed to the Mystery of Creation, come back here safely and use your mind to analyze the situation. However, do not open these doors if you are not strong enough to withstand the dangers hidden outside the consciousness. `Wasted tears that try to fight in vein'. What an amazing concept. Tears fight, well, if they do they must be fighting for the soul to be acknowledged. I think that understanding is correct because it is confirmed later on in `I die to fight!!. I die to fight!!, I die to fight!!'. Yes, when we die only the soul is left of us, so it does come to expression then. I think that `bent cold sidewalk' stands for our physical body, but I am not sure. I don't understand the crown and the table with dusty plates metaphor. Let me know if you do. And does `this door' stand for our present human incarnation in and around the 20th Century? That would explain why it is so heavy and deeply stained (especially if you happen to live in post war Germany). Heavy substance and delivered to us by an Englishman in a Gothic envelope which could almost be taken for a German accent. Absolutely one of a kind. The same goes for this entire album. However, if you are new to Tangerine Dream and not sure where to start, perhaps you should not start here, unless you love progressive rock genre. Otherwise, please read my review of Stratosfear.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars With hindsight, way before its time..., 21 July 2006
By 
DSR (out beyond the sticks) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Cyclone (Audio CD)
I remember the consternation when Tangerine Dream performed in London in '78 or thereabouts and featured a drummer and a singer, featuring untreated (?) flutes etc.. "They're a rock band now" stated the reviewer of the gig.

This didn't bode well for the release of this album and I must admit I was shocked on first hearing.

Thirty years on and it doesn't grate half as much. The drumming serves no real purpose here as drummer Klaus Kreiger only keeps time with the sequencers (a wasted opportunity rectified in the followup "Force Majeure). Steve Jolliffe does some great, other worldly effects with his voice and flutes etc. and the vocal to "Rising Runner" adds a kind of menace and urgency to the track.

The track "Madrigal Meridian", which took up all of side 2, has some great sounds, but the whole is rather disjointed and lumpy compared to the smoother flow of previous albums.

Definitely an acquired taste and a sort of "warning" of what was to happen to the band's sound years later after Chris Franke departed...............
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Melting with nostalgy, 3 July 2001
By 
Paz Einat (Nes Ziona, Israel) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cyclone (Audio CD)
I have just purchased this CD and was delighted to listen to it again after almost 20 years. I regard this album as one of TD most emotional works.
I enjoyed reading the analysis of Steve Benner but I think he missed a few important points and I disagree with his bottom line. The drumming part in the first track is indeed annoying to some extent and doesn't come close to the level presented by the great drummers of King Crimson. However, the piece, as a whole, sound well and the monotonous drumming can be perceived as a deliberate companion to the monotonous song lines. The beautiful middle part certainly makes up for the flaws in the piece.
Madrigal meridian is the main composition of the CD. A 3 minutes prelude melts into the initial "melody of delightful simplicity" (as perfectly described by Steve Benner) but the important thing here is the development of the melody, how it changes and, especially, the surprising and extraordinary Jewish-Gypsy style emotional variations performed by several instruments. The piece is very complex and has a unity and overall harmony that holds it, with all its parts, on a firm artistic ground.
The bottom line: this is an effort by TD to do something different. They succeeded in the 3rd track but less in the other two tracks. It is an enjoyable CD highly recommended for those who look for complexity and artistry.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars a different dream, 2 Aug 2010
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This review is from: Cyclone (Audio CD)
The first Tangerine Dream album with a live drummer, that suits their style and gives it more of a groove, however, the vocals are a little off putting (that was new too). The last track is the most listenable as it is pure Tangerine Dream, inmstrumental all the way with that classic Edgar Froese sound. For my money, their next album was better by far; Force Majeure.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Blown Away!!!, 29 Sep 2007
By 
Stotty (Bolton, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cyclone (Audio CD)
After the departure of Peter Baumann, Tangerine Dream would change tack somewhat with this next effort.
After making moody, atmospheric soundscapes in their early days, the band had streamlined their sound a little bit, experimenting more with tunes, melodies and other instruments.
With 'Cyclone', surviving members Edgar Froese and Chris Franke recruited a singer/flautist, Steve Jollife and a drummer, Klaus Kreiger and made a progressive rock album.
'Cyclone' is one of those albums that splits the fanbase down the middle. To some, it is an inspired effort, to others, the idea of Tangerine Dream having vocals and lyrics is nothing short of heresy, and 'Cyclone' is a total disaster.
I'm one of those fans who actually enjoy the album.
Opening track 'Bentcold Sidewalk' mixes classic prog with Lord Of The Ringsesque lyrics and a classic Tangerine Dream instrumental section.
'Rising Runner, Missed By Endless Sender' is a fairly nondescript piece. The vocals are nothing short of annoying, and not even some decent swirling keyboards can rescue this song from being the weakest on the album.
Closing track, the epic 'Madrigal Meridian' is a mellotron and sequencer soaked behemoth of a number, very traditional in it's composition and execution, with a half decent rhythm section thrown in. One for the die hards.
'Cyclone' is not as bad as it is often made out to be. Musically, it's very typical, and probably continues where both 'Ricochet' and 'Stratosfear' left off.
Admittedley, the vocals provide the weakest element of the record. Jolliffe tries too hard at times to sound like Yes' Jon Anderson. He also grunts and snorts through some vocal passages, causing more irritation than anything.
'Cyclone' was also probably not a good album to release in 1978 when punk was reigning supreme in the UK. However, Tangerine Dream seemed to get away it, although Jolliffe would leave the band by the end of the year.
'Cyclone' did prove that Tangerine Dream music didn't lend itself particularly well to vocals and lyrics.
Having said that, I quite like it and Edgar Froese's cover artwork is quite excellent.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Out into a New Day, 11 Feb 2011
By 
Nicholas Casley (Plymouth, Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Cyclone (Audio CD)
Apparently, TD fans were not happy when this album was released back in 1978 because of the use of vocals on some of the tracks. For me, this is not a problem, and like the later `Tyger', this is still a recognisable TD album with its emphasis on electronic keyboards and guitars. (The sleevenotes are silent as to who played the drums, and I cannot believe that there existed equipment in 1978 that could reproduce the complexity of some of the drum playing on this album.)

A TD album would not be a good TD album without some experimentation, so I welcome the vocal effort. As it happens, the provider of the vocals (and the player of flutes and other woodwind instruments) only made it onto this one TD album. Steve Joliffe did not appear on any of the group's subsequent works, despite his Peter Gabrielesque vocal style.

There are three tracks. The first, lasting thirteen minutes, is a straightforward ABA in format, its central section achieving its effect through repeated sequences whilst underpinning a sense of increasing frenzy played by other instruments. The short second track - I purposefully leave out their titles as they are really of no relation to the mood or structure of the pieces - is high-speed-train music, but ultimately it goes nowhere. It is the weakest of the three but still likeable. The third and final piece lasts twenty minutes. Its opening compares well with that of Pink Floyd's `Time', but thereafter it's a different animal altogether. Here we have more high-speed-train music, relentless and mesmerising, and incorporating at its heart separate guitar and `violin' jams. At the end the train heads off into another dimension, leaving us in a transition from the train, through the station, and out into a new day. Brilliant!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not their finest hour, 26 Mar 2009
This review is from: Cyclone (Audio CD)
To me, Cyclone was an example of the sort of thing that happens when one person has what they think is a great idea, and no-one thinks to say 'hang on a minute...'
Given the success that Klaus Schulze has had with incorporating vocals, drums, cellos, even orchestras, it seems very strange that TD seem unable to tackle any of these with any flair.

I have very occasionally listened to this album, and keep finding myself comparing it more to the experiments of Zeit and Alpha Centauri than the masterful pieces of 'Encore' and 'Sorceror'

In a nutshell TD's music has never needed the kind of structured drums that Kreiger brought in, and has subsequently destroyed their sound for the last twenty-five years. That is what the mighty sequencers are for, Edgar!
Thankfully, they eventually found their way again (for a few years), as 'Force Majeure' testifies.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easily the most inventive album of 1978, 9 July 2006
By 
T. A. Vidamour (Washington, Tyne & Wear) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Cyclone (Audio CD)
When I first heard this in 83 on vinyl, I thought: this was made in 1978, so how the hell do the drums sound so realistic? Then I thought: mmmmmmmmm It is Tangerine Dream after all, and they can do anything musically - especially when they were always ahead of their time. This is a band not too unlike Hawkwind, who also must spend most of their life in recording studios or on the road judging by their huge album output. This is the only Dream album that I own (I have about 20 of their official albums) that has lyrics, and the words and voice of Steve Jolliffe mesmerize you until your soul splits in two with appreciation. Ironically though, the most outstanding feature of this spectacular recording is 'Madrigal Meridian' the massive epic instrumental, which fills side two of the original vinyl copy. The Edgar Froese guitar solo will make you wish you could sound as good...even in a dream...excuse the pun. This album is a complete masterpiece, and it will stand the test of time - even in a billion years from now!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good buy, 15 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Cyclone (Audio CD)
An excellent buy..abit Pink Floyd'y this one but great listening all the same...had many hours of listening already wished i'd bought it sooner..
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4.0 out of 5 stars Strong Breeze Rather Than A Cyclone, 10 Sep 2013
By 
Mark Cheshire (Wiltshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Cyclone (Audio CD)
I have always found Tangerine Dream and lyrics to be rather odd bedfellows, which is why I can only rate it 4. It's no surprise then that Madrigal Meridian, the final and longest track is my favourite and one of their best tracks per se. But to be fair, it is in the wider catalogue of their work - especially in the 70s - a diversion worth making if only for experiment's sake: and what are TD all about - experimentation and pushing boundaries. Perhaps it's notable that after this came Force Majeure, perhaps the most accessible album they've made to date. If you're familiar with their work, hold no fears in terms of getting into it. Others in need of a "beginners kit" should perhaps be looking elsewhere.
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Cyclone
Cyclone by Tangerine Dream (Audio CD - 1995)
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