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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Metal Masterpiece, 6 Mar 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Heartwork (Audio CD)
'Heartwork' is the best carcass album,quite a step forward from the death metal assult of 'necroticism',although this is fantastic,with a more mature sound,and extremly clever lyrics,this makes 'heartwork' one of the best metal albums of all time.It sounds very thrashy in some places like Megadeth or Metallica ('embodiment') and can also sound like Iron Maiden ('this mortal coil') this album has so many great tracks,one of them being the title track,others being 'carnal forge' 'blind bleeding the blind' and 'buried dreams'all the medical termanology has gone,and so has the groans from Bill steer,but his guitar work makes up for it,Jeff walkers voice is forever brutal and raspy,just wish you could hear his bass more...nothing else to say but BUY IT!!!...''not a pretty picture''
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cult Gem from a Transitional Time., 7 April 2003
By 
Mr. SCM Bell "Black Cat Theory" (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Heartwork (Audio CD)
Marking the time when things started to go slightly wrong for Carcass this album, perhaps sadly, underlines just how much they could have been capable of had the continued. On Heatwork the band finally got the lavish production which was necessary to provide definition to their detuned, yet intricate guitar playing and they honed the catchiness of their songs whilst shortening the over-long widdle-fests which punctuated the previous album (Necrotism - Descanting the Insalubrious). However it was perhaps most important of all that they stepped out from under the constrictive shadow of their pseudo-pathological lyrics and made themselves just a little more palatable.
When the album arrived in 1994 heavy metal was undergoing a rather self-conscious, management assisted transformation from biker jacket wearing, buffant dandruff shaking passe into something a little more streetwise that you wouldn't be ashamed to tell prospective girlfriends that you were into. Perhaps it was this forced change that caused Carcass to lose a guitar player immediately after this release and then to split up shortly after releasing Heartwork's follow up.
History aside there are some dazzling moments on here which walk the three borders between catchy, aggressive and tehnically excellent. See Buried Dreams as case in point. Awesome toiling guitar riffs combined with vocals which although gutteral are also deciferable certainly hit the spot. This song is also in my opinion one of the best split guitar solos of the last twenty years. The title track too is a work of excellence which although sounds a lot like Kreator’s ‘Coma of Soul’ certainly, at the time, brought something fresh to the genre.
I have heard purists deriding Carcass’s later work as betraying their grindcore roots. This accusation was particularly levelled at Mr Bill Steer who was one of the founding members of Napalm Death. For me however I have always felt that Carcass were more suited to the smooth tones and technically impressive guitar playing on display here than the rough, lo-fi grind of Symphonies of Sickness and Reek of Putrefaction.
For those searching for an education in where bands like Machinehead, Static X, Fear Factory and Slipknot evolved from. You could do a lot worse than look here. Because folks, British rock music doesn’t begin and end with Coldplay.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sublime Metal, 9 Oct 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Heartwork (Audio CD)
Though the grindcore aficionados cried sell-out. This is Carcass's finest hour. Highly produced but still ferocious as ever, the medical terminology is dropped and replaced with Walker's intelligent lyrics. But what sticks out a mile is Steer's clever clever guitar. This man is seriously overburdened with talent and Heartwork is a fine showcase. Fearless, furious and downright wonderful. Ten Stars
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moving from the morgue to the mainstream, 26 Mar 2003
This review is from: Heartwork (Audio CD)
There's no doubt that Carcass already stood out from their death metal peers before this album - they already had obviously excellent musicianship, and more imagination than the bands they shared shelf space with - but with this album, they developed a new, clearer, more listenable sound that had a little more in common with mainstream thrash than their charnel-house associates. It sounds great, too - purists may disagree (at the time there were claims of 'selling out') but this album has stood the test of time, and when played against hyped bands like Slipknot it proves that you don't need masks or other gimmicks to stand out from the crowd. Amongst the best metal albums of all sub-genres, and five stars well deserved.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One hell of an album, 22 Aug 2007
By 
The Conman (Kent, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Heartwork (Audio CD)
Heartwork is no doubt one of the best albums I've bought in recent months. Heartwork is now seen as something of a classic in the metal world. Carcass where a band who were never afraid of evolving musically. Their first two albums were straight-up brutal grindcore albums that would be influential on many later bands in the same genre. With their third album Necroticism, Carcass slowed down a little bit and lenghtened the songs to make more of a death metal album. If Necroticism was where Carcass became a death metal band, then Heartowrk was where they became a melodic death metal band. However, they also just happened to release what was actually the first melodic death metal album, which helps explain the album's classic status.
Of all their albums, Heartwork is the best produced. However, the polished production doesn't make it seem poppy at all. Instead it gives extra power to the instruments, giving Heartwork one of the most crushing guitar sounds ever. This is very important to the album. Gone are the sickening gore lyrics of their earlier albums. Instead there are more mature and subtle lyrics which can actually be taken seriously. The band also made the songs a bit shorter than on Necroticism, which makes them even more catchy.
As the band charge into these songs, it can be heard that the enourmous, heavy riffs that populate them are relentless in their assault and are backed up by numerous tempo-changes, in true death metal style. However, what the band did here that was so original was to craft melody into their death metal sound. The riffs here are always very heavy but have a sense of melody as well in a way that is sometimes reminiscent of the new wave of British heavy metal (the galloping harmonic riffs in This Mortal Coil certainly bring Iron Maiden to mind).
Another factor in the new sound was the highly melodic trade-off solos between guitarists Bill Steer and Micheal Amott. These solos are very fitting within the songs but still add more melody to them. The brilliant back to back solos in Buried Dreams make for one of the best solo sections i've ever heard. Jeff Walker's raspy vocals link the band to their earlier sound but the fact that they sound a little less brutal than before is a nice touch that goes well with the sound of the album. Another link to their past is the blastbeat drums which are still here. They are used much less frequently though, and this helps add variety to some of the songs. Although every song is of the same style, they all sound pretty different and it never gets repetitive.
There is no filler at all to be found on Heartwork, and every song is filled with brilliant heavy riffs, superb trade-off solos, crisp and powerful drumming and snarled vocals. Many bands have followed the lead of this album and the whole Gothenburg Melodeath sound would soon be created as a result. The album is a must for metalheads due to its brilliantly inventive overall sound. Every band member gives his best here making heartwork a hugely enjoyable album. It is actually one of the least cheesy melodeath albums, despite being the first. My only gripe is that the bass is very hard to hear, but don't let that put you off. My favourites are Buried Dreams, No Love Lost, Heartwork, Embodiment and Doctrinal Expletives but hey, they will all own your face. As I have said before, the riffs here are just awesome. If the main riff to Embodiment, doesn't get you headbanging, I don't know what will. Bang your head!!
P.S. If you like this album, I also recommend Slaughter of the Soul by At the Gates, another classic melodeath album.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Apitomy of Metal, 24 April 2001
This review is from: Heartwork (Audio CD)
This record WILL stand the test of time, unlike many in the genre. The main reason for that is the production. One of the best recorded rock albums, Colin Richardson's live drum sound blends perfectly with the super heavy guitar. The production is one thing, and the playing is another. Each instrument is played to capacity, with the bluesy touches being sublime.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Legend, 8 Jun 2008
By 
Hedon (Eternal Night) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Heartwork (Audio CD)
Yes, this is one of those albums that not only lives up to it's reputation but actually blows it sky high out of the water. Believe the hype. Believe the other reviewers. If your looking for the apex of 90s death metal, then look no further.

Heartwork simply astounds me. At the time it was released it stood head and shoulders above the legions of parent-bothering, controversy hungry bands and their second-rate Slayer riffs and rather forced argression. You see, Heartwork moved away from the 'noise of noise sake' approach of playing the diminsish and atonal scales as fast as one could and brought to bare a little thing called refinement. Yes, this album is still very heavy and the vocals still as venemous as they get, but this aggression is matched by variety and taste. For one, the band aren't afraid to drop their double-bass bravado for some infectious grooves or a tasteful dose of melody now and again. Some parts fast, some parts slow, yet always creative and interesting, Carcass molded their death/grind roots with the pendulum swing of rock 'n' roll, the infectious crunch of thrash and the soaring guitar dynamics of yesteryear to creat a truimph in metal; accessablity and extremity without sacrificing one or the other. And their influence is as wide reaching as the bands is brilliant; a world without Heartwork is a world without Machine Head, Soilwork, Arch Enemy, Killswitch Engage, Nightrage, Shadows Fall, Black Dhalia Murder, Arsis, Lamb of God, Light this City, countless metalcore bands, All Shall Perish, and just about any death or aggressive metal band thats worth their salt. Yup, listen to Heartwork and you can hear a good 70% of todays heavy bands taking notes.

Overall, this album is a landmark not only in Death metal but in the metal sub-genre in general. Carcass proved once and for all that death metal is not a mindless mish-mash of bludgeoning and un-intelligable instruments created by hairy, sub-human prototypes. It the work of refined, musically gifted, creative and extremely talented rock musicians who are constanly pushing the boundaries and seeking new and exciting modes of musical entertainment. This is an album one can easily get lost in for days, and it never ceases to surpirse me in some way with the amount of thought and effort which was put into this little gem. A crowning acheivment not only for the band, but for UK metal in general.

A lengendary album from a legendary band, and proof that the UK can produce much, much better then the likes of Bring me the Horizon.

Essential
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the great creations of Death, 17 Dec 2003
By 
This review is from: Heartwork (Audio CD)
It can often be seen that during the most testing times in artists personal lives they can create their greatest works, and for me this Album is an example of just such a thing. Due to start their slightly extended break up, which covered the time up to the release of the next album, aptly named Swansong.
Sitting in a spot somewhere between the original grindcore/death metal roots of the band, and more mainstream metal/heavy rock, the overall sound of the album allows a lot more aggression and belief in the lyrics to add to a mix between both harsh and melodic sections that really made the whole more powerful, rather than being a 'sell-out'. It wasn't as if Carcass were going to become a commercialised version of themselves, it seemed to be more about actually making their message and the strength of their music clearer.
There isnt a weak point in the album, it was when they took a spot head and shoulders above their peers, unfortunately it only lasted for this one album and maybe half of the work on Swansong can be considered at a similar level.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the greatest album ever, 3 July 2004
This review is from: Heartwork (Audio CD)
Well what can i say about this work of art. Carcass outdid themselves and everyone else when they produced this. The greatest metal album of all time blends the harmonies of mike amott's later band arch enemy with the heaviness of nothing you've ever heard. If you buy this then you will not be dissapointed.i'd give 10 out of 5.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Definitely worth buying, 2 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Heartwork (Audio CD)
After buying the thrash/death metal masterclass that is "Surgical Steel" I of course wanted to explore their back catalogue. Taking the advice of another reviewer I tried Heartwork - I was not disappointed. This album is fantastic, full of great songs and heavy riffs. It's different from SS i.e. not as ferocious but defintely worth buying.
I bought secondhand from a reseller, came on time and in perfect condition
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Heartwork
Heartwork by Carcass (Audio CD - 1993)
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