Customer Reviews


41 Reviews
5 star:
 (27)
4 star:
 (9)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars defining momnet
Personally I believe this is the most deeply affecting work to come from the magnificent oeuvre of this genre-defining band. While ‘Strangeways’ and ‘The Queen is Dead’ may have received the critical plaudits, this is The Smiths at their viscerally heart-rending best. Morrissey’s words are an intimate manifestation of a tortured soul, an...
Published on 26 Oct. 2003 by Tom Hoy

versus
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars In retrospect: no classic....
Hmmm, I've been listening to many an old record lately, & have worked my way through The Smiths back-catalogue & to be fair, excepting compilation Hatful of Hollow, they didn't make a classic album until The Queen is Dead (1986). Johnny Marr's comparisons of MIM to The Beatles' Revolver sound a bit silly in retrospects; as debut The Smiths (1984) there are some great...
Published on 24 Dec. 2003 by Jason Parkes


Most Helpful First | Newest First

17 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars that was then, this is now, 2 May 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Meat Is Murder (Audio CD)
having bought all the Smiths records on the day of release, I'm perhaps less able to offer an objective review of this fine record. Of course I think it's brilliant (and my own personal favourite) but I won't bore you with that any further. The important thing to remember is that, at the time, there really was nothing else even remotely like them. Punk had been and gone, people were getting hard to upset, but the Smiths did it, and they did it with humour, style, and amazing tunes. Records didn't have titles like theirs, didn't have covers like theirs, and noone else looked like them, they had their own world from which fools and dullards were intentionally excluded. Of course for anyone looking at this today, this context is impossible to comprehend, but believe me, they were such a breath of fresh air. As to the lyrics being too simple, firstly how can lyrics BE too simple, (Elvis, the Pistols, Ramones) since when was intellectual content a standard gague of great pop music? That said Morrissey's lyrics ARE great, he created a world partly comprised of 1960's British kitchen sink films like Kes, and partly of the brutality of Thatcher's mid-80s Britain. So maybe to fresh (young!) ears this may today sound dated, but to me it's still a spine shiveringly brilliant achivement and in the face of no small odds either. There's really nothing today that compares with this, dizzyingly creative and utterly incisive work, not to mention fantastic tunes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Its SOLID!!!, 29 Nov. 1999
This review is from: Meat Is Murder (Audio CD)
An inane Sixth-Form reocord does not sound like this. That belongs to Shed-Seven, Semisonic or any other paper thin guitar 'indie' band you can think of. (think of Dawsons Creek)
Marrs guitar work is comfortably airy and light. Morresy is a bit over simple on the title track but in general the whole thing conveys its emotion with some sense of intimacy.
I T I S A G O O D R E C O R D !
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WHAT THEY SAID: THE SMITHS GREATEST ALBUM., 6 Dec. 2007
By 
Mr. K. A. Grossmith (Ramsgate, Kent United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Meat Is Murder (Audio CD)
A dalliance with personal opinion can often prove tedious to the onlooker, particularly if we are not familiar with the speakers' life. But,-even with the title track-, I think that everybody can relate to actual experiences similar to those on this album.

Classic art always remains such, as it motivates responses to our own actions-look at Shakespeare, or Mozart, or Michaelangelo, or the Beatles, as examples: their creative processes rely on human actions, deeds and responses to many of our experiences-through any age, regardless of the changing world.

This album is classic because we can all relate to it, thereby drawing us in and opening up those events which we may not care to relive, but that are still there nonetheless. Furthermore, great art is certainly not necessarily 'pretty'-more pretty ugly in many examples and many of the tracks on this album deal with ugly events.

How soon is now relies heavily on the broken dream of young love-whereby desperation gnaws at the mind, leaving the heart unfulfilled. We need not dwell too long on the theme, but it goes without really saying, that Marr's rift (scream) has to work in perfect harmony with Mozzers' voice for it to work: BUT, what makes it work perfectly is more important than this- WE HAVE ALL LIVED CERTAIN TIMES OF OUR LIVES IN THESE DESPERATE MOMENTS.

In the Headmaster ritual, I read a diary of my halcyon days at school: these memories of archaic teaching methods seem almost impossible to believe-but there's something romantic in the grey corridors of the old school. I may not have lived in Manchester, but I did exist in kind: we were the young troops sent out on a war of discovery, following sir and his military two-step. Those memories are as much a part of education as the curriculum. Nothings really changed, the experiences are just slightly different.

Ah- Rushholme ruffians: for me, one of the greatest tracks ever written. Can we admit to such bubble-gum life moments; true love entangled inexorably beneath the oily wheels of the crazy Wurlitzer-weren't those rockabilly operators and their slicked back hair looking for a better ride? I admired and envied them. Our fairground nestled itself in the post-war explosion of teenage love-bravado and innocence and rollies and classroom tatooes, which were etched for all time on the bare knuckles of never ending candy flossed love. I shall never forget those times-and this track keeps the moments even more alive.

But, there were, of course, many failed moments of desire-wanting the one I knew I could never have-consumed by self doubt and intolerable rejection: yes, jealousy came through the fairground gates with me, tapped me on the shoulder and screamed "you'll never get this one"! I was thus dejected by myself.

'What she said' is a cocophony of self doubt-this girl really needs to experience base love-after all, any love is better than none-isn't it? Another desperate existance, compromised by self loathing and another tatooed boy-this time fron Birkenhead. "AND I NEED TO CLING TO SOMETHING"! Does she ultimately fail-I don't think so; she'll have her lover and he'll have her, she can sense it in the smoke of her cigarettes.

Selfishness is critical to all of our lives (particlarly when we're younger), for it's a dog eat dog world, the survival of the fittest. It's a sick joke-one that's repeated so much, that it's no longer funny. Recognizing our own failings through other peoples' is the theme here. Actually, we learn much through misery.

Nonetheless, this truly is a beautiful album. Keats focused on negative capability: that no matter how negative lifes experiences are, positives can always be extracted and turned into something lovely. The examples here deal with horrible moments, for the most part, but there is much to savour in the long run. After all, thunder is frightening, but aren't we also in awe of it?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fantastic trip through the mind of a pop icon, 14 Jan. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Meat Is Murder (Audio CD)
A fantastic album, covering many images of violence and brutality from the opening track, inspired by Mozza's time at St. Marys through to the title track. Singles, 'How Soon Is Now?' and 'That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore' are classics. The album will grow on you, the more you listen to it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a must have, 17 Oct. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Meat Is Murder (Audio CD)
Although "Meat Is Murder" is a great album, its by no means the band's best, that honour going to the bands brilliant "Queen Is Dead" album, which in a way is disappointing as it's clear that the band are capable of so much more. The real highlight of this album is the guitar playing of Johnny Marr whose style really took the band to new levels and whereas previously it was a mix of the guitar playing of Marr and the lyrics of Morrissey that had carried the band, this album showed the first signs that it would be the guitar playing of Marr that would carry the band to greatness. The album features the trademark Smiths "indie" sound which characterised their music throughout their career. The highlights of this album include "The Headmaster Ritual", "Well I Wonder", "What She Said" and the brilliant "I Want The One I Can't Have". Overall it's a great album and if you're either a fan of the Smiths or Morrissey then this album is a must.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Cheap as chips on vinyl, 30 Dec. 2014
This review is from: Meat Is Murder [VINYL] (Vinyl)
Second best smiths album, first class price. £7.99 on vinyl! Wow. I have an original on a Rough a Trade and it is superb. Especially headmaster, rusholm, and thorn. Classic
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The Smiths :O), 6 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Meat Is Murder (Audio CD)
amazing album and in my opinion their best album ... if your new or have got into this band through 'best of' then this is really the next CD to get
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Couple of Duds But Overall a Strong Effort, 18 July 2012
This review is from: Meat Is Murder (Audio CD)
In comparison to the other albums by The Smiths, Meat Is Murder ranks (for me) as their weakest effort. This isn't because the songs a bad, it is just because it doesn't really have the flow that the other three albums had. There is no single musical or lyrical theme that gives consistancy to the album. Also, there is the inclusion of some tracks that are just not very good.

The opener, Headmaster's Ritual is an example of Johnny Marr's best work. In addition, the rythm section is tight and strong, atop of Morrissey's strong vocal delivery it seems to make for a classic, but it never reaches it. Rusholme Ruffians is a great, Rockabilly track with another good performance from all members, but it doesn't quite flow properly from the opener, just like it doesn't flow into I Want The One I Can't Have. I Want The One I Can't Have is a highlight for me, but the following What She Said, took a while for me to appreciate. (I only started to like it after hearing it on 'Rank.')

That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore is a stunning number, but again the music contrast awkwardly with the prior track. Nowhere Fast is a wonderfully strong, witty number and sets a certain pace, which the following track Well I Wonder, counters. Well I Wonder is itself a great track and a guitar masterpiece. I think however, it might have worked more effectively if placed better.

We then come to the only true failure on the album, which is Barbarism Begins At Home. It has a great funky rythm and though the lyrics are basicially about three different sentances repeated over and over, it kind of works. The failure lies in the length of the track, which is just too long. I like long songs, but they need to have some good, alternating hooks, rather than the same thing over and over.

I think the final track, Meat Is Murder should have been preceded by Well I Wonder instead of Barbarism, because again the two tracks don't flow well, especially as they are both rather long. Meat Is Murder however, is an example of a strong, long song. The sounds of the animals is a nice dramatic effect, the lyrics and Morrissey's voice are really heartfelt, showing that he really cares about what he is singing, something also reflected in the playing of the music. It is a great ending to the album overall.

To conclude, I have to say that while the majority of songs on this album are great, it could have been structered a lot better. In addition, I think that Barbarism should have been a B-Side, or shortened at the very least, as it really pulls the album down.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars But Fishing is Justifiable Genocide, 23 Feb. 2008
This review is from: Meat Is Murder (Audio CD)
The Smiths releasing `Meat is Murder' was considered so significant that myself and a friend, Haggis, felt obliged to bunk off school to get hold of it the Monday morning it was released. We saw nothing strange as we pored over the `Meat is Murder' artwork in a KFC while we waited for a bus to takes us back to my house and more importantly my dansette.

With the benefit of hindsight I think The Smiths were a perfect singles band but that there albums were possibly of a lower standard. I think the single `That Joke isn't Funny Anymore' stands head and shoulders above the remainder of the album. That's not to say there aren't any great songs here `The Headmaster Ritual', `Rusholme Ruffians' and `I Want the One I Can't Have' are all fantastic however I think that the desire to shake up the arrangements whilst sticking to the four piece combo was taking its toll. I think this is most apparent on `Barbarism Begins at Home' with Marr's funk guitar playing not suiting Morrissey's vocal at all, the chain saw and cow mooing special effects on `Meat is Murder' also possibly labour the point.

This is not a poor record, merely a poor Smiths record, which still makes fantastic, like Lowry on acid.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 2 Oct. 2014
This review is from: Meat Is Murder [VINYL] (Vinyl)
if you havent heared it before it may be about time to do so
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Meat Is Murder
Meat Is Murder by The Smiths (Audio CD - 1993)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews