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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An outstanding collection of early Hendrix recordings
If you don't have at least one Jimi Hendrix album in your CD collection, you really need to rethink your musical priorities. I don't think I need to explain the revolutionary legacy of Hendrix to anyone, so I'll just get right to the content on this particular CD. The year was 1967, and Hendrix's career had just blasted off in the UK, when The Jimi Hendrix Experience...
Published on 27 Sept. 2004 by Daniel Jolley

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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the authentic deal
Radio One is a collection of material recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience live in the studio for various BBC Radio shows during 1967.

BUT.

There is one BIG difference between what you would have heard with those original radio broadcasts, and what you hear with this CD today. The original recordings were created (and broadcast) in mono. This...
Published on 19 Oct. 2011 by XBBX


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An outstanding collection of early Hendrix recordings, 27 Sept. 2004
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Radio One (Audio CD)
If you don't have at least one Jimi Hendrix album in your CD collection, you really need to rethink your musical priorities. I don't think I need to explain the revolutionary legacy of Hendrix to anyone, so I'll just get right to the content on this particular CD. The year was 1967, and Hendrix's career had just blasted off in the UK, when The Jimi Hendrix Experience (Hendrix, Noel Redding, and Mitch Mitchell) came together for several recording sessions for BBC Radio. You will find a number of Hendrix's most memorable songs in this collection, but they differ from the versions most fans are familiar with. Alongside these more familiar tracks are a number of very interesting covers and blues-oriented recordings, a few of which could and should be considered true rarities.
Appropriately enough, this collection starts out with an anthem song, Stone Free. With the funk established, it's time to jam. Hendrix standards emerging from these early recordings are Fire, Foxy Lady, Purple Haze, and Hey Joe. Hendrix pulls out all of the heavy guitar stops on the short but enervating Killing Floor. This killer track is then followed by what is still, as far as I am aware, the only live version of the classic Love or Confusion. Hendrix's mastery of the guitar is made most evident in a scintillating performance of Drivin' South. I find the background vocals on Wait Until Tomorrow somewhat questionable, but this track is a real treat indeed, as this was a song Hendrix never performed on stage. You get a somewhat light version of Hear My Train a Comin', infused with a lot of interaction with the small studio audience. Spanish Castle Magic is pretty faithful to the later studio version, but this is probably the earliest recording made of this standout song. Yet another significant recording is Burning of the Midnight Lamp, a much different version from that which appeared on the Electric Ladyland album of the following year.
Radio One Theme is a playful bit of filler, really, a half-joking new theme song for Britain's insurgent Radio One rock station. Hendrix's cover of the Beatles' Day Tripper takes the song to heights never imagined by the team of Lennon and McCartney. The novelty of this cover still pales in comparison to that of Hound Dog, which comes complete with all sorts of barks and howls from band members.
For me, the best this album has to offer are the blues-oriented recordings, in which Hendrix pays tribute to some of the strongest influences of his youth - the legendary Muddy Waters, in particular. Catfish Blues is great, but Hoochie Koochie Man is easily my favorite song on this album.
All told, these 17 early recordings showcase the variety of musical styles that Jimi Hendrix made his own, and the entire album has a fresh and jubilant feel that differs from the heavier sound of Hendrix's later career. I wouldn't necessarily recommend Radio One as someone's first introduction to Jimi Hendrix, but Hendrix fans will definitely love every one of the 59 - plus minutes of this album.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Hendrix album, with a very different sound, 4 May 2014
By 
Mr Baz - See all my reviews
(#1 REVIEWER)    (No. 1 Hall OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Radio One (Audio CD)
I bought this on Vinyl in the early 90's and updated to CD years later.
The Album was later released in the "BBC Sessions" compilation (1998) a double disc collection including all these tracks

First off it's true that many recordings up up-sampled from mono (no idea why they were not using stereo at the studio) still I never really felt it diminished the appeal of the album.
Looking at the track list you might be forgiven for thinking it's yet another Jimi Hendrix re-hash of mostly the same songs we've heard and know so well.

What's different here though is the playing style, the sound is very improvised (and sounds raw and fresh) Jimi's rendition of Purple Haze, Hey Joe, Foxy Lady, etc sound entirely different to previous versions. Stone free has a more downbeat feel..jagged and darker, Purple Haze is also quite unique and offers an alternative version over the well known cleaner single release.

There are also a few gems in here, Jimi goes into blues mode with "Hoochie Coochie Man" , "Catfish Blues" and "Hear My Train a Comin'" showing his roots and love of the genre, you can feel him really getting into some of the tracks.

"Drivin' South" is an instrumental that turns into a sensational lick that really shows Jimi's skill on the guitar, it's a simple song but one that really revs up.
"Hound Dog" is a million miles away from the smooth Elvis version, the boys are heard howling like dogs in the recording. It's deep & rough, surprisingly works very well
"Day Tripper" is Jimi's cover of the well know Beatles song, and he provides quite an interesting version.
"Radio One" is a short song (no surprise considering the album name) it's quite nifty with a growling Hendrix spicing things up.

I enjoy the album more than I though because it's so different to the normal Hendrix, it's rougher, darker and more coarse with a sound that's far removed from the Hendrix norm, and all the better for it too (variety makes for a more interesting listening experience)

As with all Hendrix albums you sometimes wonder if the boys are getting a bit "out there" at times, but there is some fine playing here, and clearly the group are having a lot of fun making the recordings.

It's a good addition even if you have these tracks or most of them.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the authentic deal, 19 Oct. 2011
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This review is from: Radio One (Audio CD)
Radio One is a collection of material recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience live in the studio for various BBC Radio shows during 1967.

BUT.

There is one BIG difference between what you would have heard with those original radio broadcasts, and what you hear with this CD today. The original recordings were created (and broadcast) in mono. This modern CD uses digital trickery to turn that mono into fake-stereo, and the result is certainly NOT for the better.

The manner in which producer Alan Douglas seems to have achieved the stereo effect was by splitting the frequencies, the higher frequencies to one speaker and the lower to the other. This has resulted in the album being almost unlistenable through headphones because it gives the impression of the sound being noticeably off-centre. The effect is so bad that the first time I heard this CD through headphones I thought the headphones themselves were faulty. Out of the 17 tracks on this compilation only about 5 sound normal, properly centred. Heard through regular speakers this effect isn't really noticeable, but it does render the sound a little flat and lifeless in comparison to the original 1960s mono mixes.

Only a couple of years after this CD was released an American radio station named Westwood One broadcast those original mixes. They have since appeared on various unofficial CDs and reveal that in mono this material has more punch, energy and definition than can be found on the modern fake-stereo alternatives. Quite simply, in mono these tracks sound more "alive", more powerful . The difference really is one of night-and-day.

Why on earth Alan Douglas decided to reprocess the mono tapes in a manner which degraded the sound quality and sonic impact is a question only he can answer. I can think of no justification for converting this material into fake stereo other than simply converting it for the sake of converting it. The mind boggles.

The music itself itself can't be faulted. Recorded live in the studio, these sessions catch The Jimi Hendrix Experience during their initial rise to stardom. So what you largely get are raw and raucous 3 minute (or less) versions of Are You Experienced material, interspersed with some impressive extended bluesy numbers (the latter clearly showing the direction in which Hendrix and the band would develop onstage over the following couple of years).

There are also a couple of covers where Jimi is clearly having fun, Hound Dog and Day Tripper (the latter NOT featuring John Lennon on backing vocals, as the myth claims. It's Noel Redding), and Drivin' South (of interest because it's an instrumental which Hendrix originally played in his pre-fame days with Curtis Knight's band. This Experience version ups the tempo and turns into a tour de force of Hendrixian guitarisms).

It's not an understatement to say these BBC recordings are essential for any fan of the Are You Experienced period. There's none of the brain-twisting or mellow psychedelia of his latter years. This is almost garage-band Hendrix, knocking it out rough and ready, pure Rock and Roll, Proto-Rock, Ryhthm and Blues or however you choose to label it. It's the nearest you'll today get to actually attending a live Experience concert in one of London's small nightclubs in 1967.

So how would I grade this album?

Well, the music on this CD (and the manner in which its performed) I'd grade a solid 5 stars. But simply down to the recordings having been fudged into fake-stereo, I have to give it an overall single star rating.

The tragic thing is that when Experience Hendrix re-released these sessions (with extra material) a few years ago, they also used the fake-stereo masterings. A few of the tracks on that double-CD set were the original mono, but some also had added modern reverb. And of course that release has compression missing from this edition.

So if you wish to hear the best official release of Hendrix's BBC material, it's a toss-up between two evils because there is currently no official version of this album available which matches the original untampered mono tapes for impact. If you want to hear this stuff sounding at its most powerful and in its best quality, the record company have left you no choice but to seek out unofficial and illegal product.

That's a shameful state of affairs. This set DESERVES better. It captures Hendrix at a crucial time in his development, playing some unique material. It's screaming out to be released in full, in the original MONO mix. Only when that day comes will the true majesty of these BBC recordings be unleashed.

Maybe when those handed the care of the Hendrix legacy divert their attention from branding the man's image upon tin boxes, plastic mugs and air fresheners, to refocus completely upon presenting his music in the best possible manner, we will get to see that day. Maybe.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars radio one, you stole my gal - but I love you just the same..., 10 Jun. 2014
By 
gille liath (US of K) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Radio One (Audio CD)
Jimi Hendrix was a bad influence on music. When you hear the electrifying Drivin' South, you can hardly help thinking that a five-minute jam on one riff, with one lead instrument, is a good idea - cue thousands of tedious power trios. But it isn't, really: not unless you have a quality rhythm section and a guitarist with a talent approaching genius. In that number, Killing Floor, Catfish Blues (with its impromptu drum solo as Jimi broke a string) and his personal anthem Hear My Train a Comin', you have some of his best work: more expansive and spontaneous than the studio albums (on which none of those tracks appear) but not full of careless mucking about like the concert sets. It's not just that nobody else has ever played like that; with Hendrix the guitar doesn't play, it sings - straight out of his voodoo chile soul. Nobody can play like him because nobody can be like him.

It has to be said that he wasn't in the genius class as a songwriter, and for various reasons many of his best numbers were seldom played live. Rare performances of Love or Confusion and Wait Until Tomorrow are welcome; on the other hand songs like Fire and Foxy Lady passed muster because everyone was in awe of his sound, but really they're uninteresting top-of-the-head rockers. As for plodding Psychedelic Folk standard Hey Joe, even Hendrix himself was quickly sick of the sight of it (referring to it in one TV performance as 'this rubbish').

So it ain't perfect; but none of his albums are (Axis: Bold As Love is brilliant but a bit one-sided), and the best-ofs never manage to pin him down. If I had to pick one album to represent the best of what Hendrix was about, I think this would be the one. If the 60s weren't always like this, they bloody well ought to have been. And it was on Radio 1! What happened...?
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5.0 out of 5 stars 5 for Jimi, 3 for the Cd!, 17 July 2011
By 
T. S. C. (Somewhere in NW England.) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
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This review is from: Radio One (Audio CD)
I bought this cheaply because it was used, and some of the tracks jump a little, but it's near the end of the Cd, so it isn't a major problem.

That aside, this Radio 1 Cd is chock full of Hendrix recordings, some you will have heard before, and others that are rarer. The nice thing is that even songs like Purple Haze, Stone Free and Hey Joe, to name but three, are all played differently from other recordings, which was always Jimi's way anyway it seems. My favourite tracks on this, for sheer Hendrix magic and improvisational ability, are 'Drivin' South' 'Catfish Blues' and 'Hear my Train A Comin''. Lovers of Hendrix in full flight will enjoy these tracks immensely, especially 'Drivin' South' which is basically amazing lead guitar driven rock.

For the owners of Jimi Hendrix's music, they must be laughing all the way to the bank because he seems to have left a huge amount of recorded work; some not bad, some good, and some phenomenal. Jimi at his worst was equal to most guitarist's best, and Jimi at his best? Well, then he could take you into outer space!
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5.0 out of 5 stars ..........Incredible......10 Stars!!!!, 16 Aug. 2009
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This review is from: Radio One (Audio CD)
Radio One......A Superb Collection Of Hendrix Classics " Stone Free", " Hey Joe", " Fire", " Purple Haze" & " Foxy Lady" & Rarities " Radio One Theme", " Day Tripper", " Hound Dog" & " Hoochie Koochie Man"......Recorded Live At The Beeb Studios.....Hendrix Was On Top Of His Game Here.....Make No Mistake..........When It's This Good, Words Are Futile..............Essential
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great!, 24 Nov. 2012
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Sounds perfect and arrived when expected. Bought for my trips from surfing, nails it perfect on the way home! Right on!
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5.0 out of 5 stars master of guitar, 22 Sept. 2013
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This review is from: Radio One (Audio CD)
great music used to have it on casette? well worth owning on cd required listening do not hesitate to buy
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5.0 out of 5 stars just a good artist not a lot of bad by this guy, 15 May 2013
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This review is from: Radio One (Audio CD)
got this for a friend
i was happy with the album well put together
and i tell other people about
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 29 Dec. 2014
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This review is from: Radio One (Audio CD)
perfect as new
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