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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply superb!
A dark and moody album where distorted guitar and sax are magically interwoven to produce an all time classic from Bowie. Not at all like Aladdin Sane which has an almost pop feel, nor like Ziggy which is acoustic-based, this album is far more complex and mature.
One of the interesting things about this music is the band - or lack of it! This album was recorded in...
Published on 12 Oct 2001

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Change of Direction
So what do you do when you've released three classic rock albums in a row? In Bowie's case you don't stick with the tried and tested but move off in another direction. The apocalyptic feel is still there but these songs are more uneasy, more edgy and there's a thudding beat running through the album. There's nothing easy about Diamond Dogs. Songs Like Big Brother and 1984...
Published 5 months ago by Mr. Peter Steward


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply superb!, 12 Oct 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Diamond Dogs (Audio CD)
A dark and moody album where distorted guitar and sax are magically interwoven to produce an all time classic from Bowie. Not at all like Aladdin Sane which has an almost pop feel, nor like Ziggy which is acoustic-based, this album is far more complex and mature.
One of the interesting things about this music is the band - or lack of it! This album was recorded in 1974 just after the spiders had disbanded. Bowie therefore had a far greater input into this album than any previous, one would imagine. Evidence of this is the number of instruments he plays - accompanied by a drummer and occasional pianist and guitarist.
Get this it will grow on you with time and stay with you for ever.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sweet thing!, 30 Jan 2012
This review is from: Diamond Dogs (Audio CD)
Tracks 3 to 5, 'Sweet Thing', 'Candidate' and 'Sweet Thing Reprise' are so astoundingly perfect that the rest of the album is almost an anti-climax, even though everything is at genius level. 'Sweet Thing' fades in beautifully, the shrieking vocal is beyond belief, and the lyrical quality and depth so superior that this could be studied for a degree in English literature. The seedy filth of the drug-run city we all dread is perfectly encapsulated by a wall of sound and introspection of the highest order.
'Is it nice in your snowstorm ... freezing your brain?
Do you think that your face looks the same?
Well then indeed ... it's all I ever wanted ...
It's a street with a deal .. and a face,
It's got claws, it's got me, it's got .... you!'
How do you even begin to give a shade of constructive criticism to that?
On top of this, the man played every instrument himself.
Bowie rises above the limits of human creativity. The level of his talent is beyond ordinary human comprehension.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How can you pick one favourite Bowie album!, 12 Dec 2000
This review is from: Diamond Dogs (Audio CD)
Yes, it was originally supposed to be for a musical based on 1984. At the end of the day though it stands alone on the strength of the songs. This is, on occasion, my favourite Bowie album - although a great many of his albums have also held that spot. It starts with the spoken Future Legend which Bowie later made the mistake of trying to emulate on the Glass Spider. It sets the tone for one or two fairly dark moments - notably the Sweet Thing/Candidate/Sweet Thing (Reprise) section. This for me is the highlight of the whole album - strong both lyrically and musically. While some of the songs link obviously to the 1984 theme, these fit in feel unlike the rather more obvious 1984 and Big Brother. All in all a strong album which benefits from being listened to as a whole. If you want to hear some interesting cover versions of some of the tracks - try to find the Wedding Present doing Chant of the Ever Circling Skeletal Family or Rickie Lee Jones doing Rebel Rebel.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Future Legend, 17 Oct 2008
By 
fatsovonchubby (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Diamond Dogs (Audio CD)
Diamond Dogs is my favourite Bowie album. I can't directly measure or directly explain why it comes in first before other greats in the Bowie back catalogue - it just does. The imagination, diversity of style, background unease of a bleak social chaos sprinkled throughout - it all cooks together marvellously to serve up a punchy, fragrant banquet of classics. My only criticism of the album is that it begins to flag a wee bit in in the middle before the final few songs deliver the best of finishes - and I think that one less song could have made it perfect. Nevertheless - DD is a firm favourite.

There's no point echoing the rest of the comments that have preceded mine. Bowie could have disappeared altogether after Aladdin Sane - but he managed to conjure up 3 of his best albums in Diamond Dogs, Young Americans and Station To Station.

Diamond Dogs was daring, different, and for the lack of another D word - absolutely bloody fantastic. There's nothing else quite like it - so give it a try if you don't own it as it's a bargain at today's prices.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sex, Lies, And Genocide, 16 Feb 2000
By 
David (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Diamond Dogs (Audio CD)
Praised by critics and hardcore fans, "Diamond Dogs" represents Bowie's thwarted efforts to translate George Orwell's "1984" into a rock opera. Having sacked The Spiders, Bowie took full helm, writing, arranging, and producing this album. To help him in his task he gathered a new cast of musicians including Mike Garson, who had previously provided some outstanding piano work for the "Aladdin Sane" album.
In "Diamond Dogs", Orwell's bleak, totalitarian Eurasia becomes Hunger City. A debauched, sprawling, post-apocalyptic metropolis populated by sleazy punks, where as Bowie narrates in "Future Legend", '...fleas the size of rats sucked on rats the size of cats'.
The rollicking title track and the anthem like "Rebel Rebel" provided the album with a couple of hit-singles. But it is "Sweet Thing", "Candidate", and "Sweet Thing (Reprise)", which together make up a delightful tripartite tale, telling of the corruption and sexual depravity contained within this decaying urban landscape, that serves as a centrepiece for the album.
As with Winston and Julia in Orwell's novel, the protagonists of "We Are The Dead" are ultimately condemned for their sex crimes: "Dress yourself my urchin one, for I hear them on the rails/Because of all we've seen, because of all we've said/We are the dead" cries a distraught Bowie over Garson's haunting melody.
"Big Brother" paints a rather despairing picture of future society, a society broken and lost, desperately waiting to be claimed by a 'Homo superior', before segueing into the terrifying "Chant Of The Ever Circling Skeletal Family".
The plot is rather under-developed, allowing the listeners to bring in their own meanings. And Bowie's use of Burroughs' cut-up technique leaves the songs feeling somewhat fragmented and incongruous in places. Despite this however, "Diamond Dogs" is a very enjoyable record. It is theatrical, camp, provocative, and disturbing in many ways, and still remains one of Bowie's most creative records to date.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars End of Bowie's First Golden Era, 2 Sep 2009
By 
Morten Vindberg (Denmark) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Diamond Dogs (Audio CD)
Diamond Dogs was the last great album of Bowie's first golden era of what is often referred to as glamrock. This term may give rise to negative associations, which would be deeply unfair in Bowie's case. He stood in the early 1970s for some of the best and most progressive music in this genre.

After the "Diamond Dogs" he radically changed his style with the album "Young Americans" and even though the subsequent, more techno-like albums are highly praised, he never rocked more convincing than on his great early 1970's albums.

Title track is a fine rocker in the style of "Suffragette City" from "Ziggy Stardust" and "Rebel Rebel" has one of the best guitar riffs in rock and roll history. Both numbers were chosen as singles.

The suite "Sweet Thing / Candidate" is another highlight on the album.

More mainstream is the rock ballad "Rock'n Roll With Me", although certainly also one of my personal favorites. The number "1984" was originally conceived as a title number and appears almost as a movie-themed track with its energetic funky riffs.

The record probably works best when heard in its entirety; several tracks don't work very well outside the album context and the album therefore probably cannot be included among Bowie's very best.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lets Dance this ain't!, 23 May 2012
By 
Mr. A. Moss (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Diamond Dogs (Audio CD)
Probably the best Bowie / any album of all time.

Bowie laid bare, with all his mythology's crashing into each other. Insanity, drugs and the compete degradation of the soul all compete for the centre of medical attention in a loveless Owellian universe.

Musically and lyrically as potent as anything Bowie has conjured before or since, let Diamond Dogs be the standard by which all other epics are measured.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is the Diamond Dogs B*ll*cks! x 2, 13 Aug 2006
Firstly, it would be a waste of time to give the highlights of this exceptional and timeless classic Bowie album, as it is all brilliant stuff, so this review will concentrate more on disc 2, but what I will say though, is that tracks like: 'Sweet Thing', 'We Are The Dead' and 'Big Brother' for example, may have been a big influence on Goth Music - as this sounds like prototype Goth to me.

Here are the highlights of disc 2, starting off with: '1984/Dodo' with its lush string arrangements to die for and its funky 'Shaft' wah wah guitar sound, plus the 'Dodo' bits which have a great brass section to them. Next up is 'Rebel Rebel (US Single Version)' which was the version that was played live throughout the 70's/80's right up to, and including 1990's 'Sound & Vision' tour. You know, the one with the "la la la la la's" in the chorus, and although different to the original is just as awesome. 'Dodo' is a gem of a tune, that as I have already mentioned has an excellent brass sound to it. 'Alternative Candidate' is completely different to the album version, and again is a gem of a tune that is charmingly smutty and pleased with itself. Finally, we have 'Rebel Rebel (2003)' which is an updated version that sounds very Americanised (but in a good way) that was originally performed in this way on the 2002 'Heathen' tour, and then became the new 'live' version.

'Diamond Dogs' is a Gothic Masterpiece that I cannot recommend highly enough, and this 2-disc 30th Anniversary Edition just adds to the enjoyment.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best (and most underrated) Bowie album, 22 Dec 2007
By 
I. P. Hale (Liverpool, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Diamond Dogs (Audio CD)
Diamond Dogs is often seen as a departure from mainstream rock by Bowie that only ended with "Scary Monsters". This it was. However, if you think about it, the following year the punk revolution happened, this album is alot like punk, so maybe Bowie forsaw the revolution.

First you have Future Legend, a spoken word opener to Diamond Dogs.
Diamond Dogs itself is loud and fastpaced and easy to get stuck in your head.
Then is Sweet thing/Candidate. This is in my mind undoubtably the best song on the album. It has amazing saxophone and guitar solos that define the song from the others. The sow paced rhythm and fast vocals put a mood of desperate melancholy on the piece.
Then is Rebel Rebel. The classic piece needs no explanation.
Then comes Rock 'n' Roll with me, it was co-written with Warren piece and, in my mind, lets the album down. The lyrics are uninsperational at leasy and the music is bad.
The Mission impossible style 1984 is also bad, but not as bad as the previous track.
Then is We Are the Dead, it is the second best song on the album. It may be long and samey but if you listen to the lyrics, it is amazing.
Then is Big Brother/Chant of the ever circling skelatle family. It is quite Soulish, a preview of his next album, Young Americans. The third best song on the album, its ups and downs generate an energy that isn't present apart from in Diamond Dogs and Rebel Rebel. The Chant of the skeletal family is the best part, with the continous chant and the "CD skip" style ending

All in all, Diamond Dogs is in an awkward position, half way between Punk and Soul. However, I love it for what it is.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars it grew on me -a lot, 20 Jan 2012
By 
markr - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Diamond Dogs (Audio CD)
I remember as a teenager hearing this for the first time on the day it was released- I was, and remain, a huge Bowie fan but the first time i heard this album, i didn't warm to it at all. And that's the point really; this is not easy music and it requires several listens to realise just how good it is. And it is very good indeed, containing the quite wonderful Rebel, Rebel, and the outstanding Sweet Thing - one of the best tracks Bowie, or anyone else, ever wrote. There are numerous great tracks though, with 1984, We are the Dead, and Rock 'n' Roll with Me also amongst the standouts.

Here were the first signs of the soul sounds which would form Bowie's next album, Young Americans: Remastered, but in Diamond Dogs they are blended with more conventional rock music to great effect

A wonderful album - well worth the listens if you don't absolutely love it immediately.

Highly recommended
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Diamond Dogs
Diamond Dogs by David Bowie (Audio CD - 1999)
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