Customer Reviews


23 Reviews
5 star:
 (19)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars All hands on deck...
With the band's first two releases 'in the bag', Salvo let fly this top notch repackaging of PH's much-awaited next move, and don't disappoint. 1969's 'A Salty Dog' (****) is possibly Procul Harum's finest hour: a trove of memorably lush melodies replete with towering orchestration interspersed with a dizzying array of hard rock, charming od-ditties, ball-bustingly dirty...
Published on 26 Jun 2009 by Rob Brook

versus
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Misrepresented ...
this product is NOT anything resembling Procul Harum's album A Salty Dog ... only one song from the original album; very disappointing, would not recommend.
Published 4 months ago by Philippa Carrick


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars All hands on deck..., 26 Jun 2009
With the band's first two releases 'in the bag', Salvo let fly this top notch repackaging of PH's much-awaited next move, and don't disappoint. 1969's 'A Salty Dog' (****) is possibly Procul Harum's finest hour: a trove of memorably lush melodies replete with towering orchestration interspersed with a dizzying array of hard rock, charming od-ditties, ball-bustingly dirty blues, even a spot of folk. Genre-hopping generally doesn't work across an album: there's too little time to assert sufficient credibility in any one field and the whole affair too often slips apologetically away. Gary Brooker, Keith Reid and Matthew Fisher as writers (Fisher also produces the album) are exceptions, coupling astutely commercial yet original composition to exciting and breezily confident performances. This has been reissued before, of course, but never with the definitiveness of Salvo's packages, which brim with new interviews, track annotations and rare pictures that assure them future collectability. Bonus tracks x six include hardrocking studio take 'Long Gone Geek' plus US-recorded live material that reinstates rightly high regard for the band on the performance circuit. But it's the grand sweep of 'A Salty Dog's' titular opener and the equally powerful 'Wreck Of The Hesperus' that set the band apart. All hands on deck, indeed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An enduring classic, 21 Jun 2009
By 
P. Martland (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I was nine years old in 1969, and wouldn't buy my first album until the age of 11 two years later so never heard this album at the time.

Thanks to infrequent but judicious radio play from the likes of John Peel, Alan Freeman etc. the title track from this album did, over the years infiltrate my sub-conscious to the point where my curiosity got the better of me and I bought the album. I was well into my twenties. The title track is an absolute masterpiece and all else on the album is neccessarily in its shadow. But look and listen closely there are other sparkling gems in that shade.

It seemed timeless and ageless when I first bought it in the eighties and hearing it again remastered and repackaged with interesting extra tracks it still does. All hands on deck! Immerse yourself in its beauty.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a drummer, 30 Dec 2011
By 
Mr. Stephen Reid (Liverpool, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a great album, made better by the bonus tracks. The production (and orchestration) by Matthew Fisher is flawless. The title track is a haunting and atmospheric song of the sea. The keyboards (both Brooker's piano & Fisher's Hammond) are sublime, Keith Reid's lyrics are simultaneously witty, scholary and raunchy. Robin Trower shows why he was regarded by many as a natural heir to Jimi, and Gary Brooker's vocals make you wonder how the hell he was overlooked while the likes of Rod Stewart were held in such critical awe for so long. The album cover (a brilliant spoof of the old Player's Navy Cut cigarette pack) is one of the most iconic of the sixties. But thats not what this review is about. No, this review is about Barrie Wilson's drumming. The late Barrie (BJ) Wilson was in my opinion the best of the five best drummers of the rock era - you don't want to know the other four (oh okay then, its John Bonham, John Densmore, Topper Headon and Dave Mattacks). Good drummers keep the beat almsost unobtrusively - they drive the rhythm, and that's it, but when BJ plays you find yourself listening to the drums like they were a lead instrument, with no detriment to the rest of the track. His drumming quite literally punctuates Procol's melodic and lyrical masterpieces. Listen for example to "The Milk Of Human Kindness" (and the bonus "raw" track) - I defy you not to anticipate every across the beat hit he makes. Apparently he used to sit side on to the drum-kit, leading one reviewer of a Procol gig to comment that BJ looked like an "octopus in the bath" while drumming - what a great image!
Hail to the drummer; Barrie Wilson - powerhouse behind the kit.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A 1969 masterpiece, 13 Jun 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Salty Dog (Audio CD)
Procol Harum's 3rd studio album is a heady mix of progressive rock, hard rock and blues; the ever-reliable writing team of Gary Brooker and Keith Reid provide many classic moments here - the gorgeous 'Salty Dog' kicks things off majestically with the superb 'The Milk of Human Kindness' and superior ballad 'All This And More' also standing out in my opinion. Matthew Fisher gets more opportunities to display his writing talents particularly on 'Wreck Of The Hesperus' ~ a track that showcases Robin Trower's excellent guitar work; for me, this should definitely have been included on the 'Secrets Of The Hive' compilation album. Elsewhere, Fisher's lovely 'churchy' organ sounds bring back memories of 'A Whiter Shade of Pale', especially on the closing track 'Pilgrim's Progress'. 'Crucifiction Lane' allows Trower to shine again in broody style and 'Too Much Between Us' is a lovely slower song with sweet harmonies. Overall, this is a classic LP which fans of eclectic rock music should find fascinating to listen to.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Music To Feed The Senses, 11 May 2010
By 
Armchair Pundit "Armchair Pundit." (Durham City, England.) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
"A Salty Dog" original release date May 1969.
This is music for headphones and a certain state of mind.
And if you think that is pretentious, just listen to the album, then decide.
Standout tracks.
A Salty Dog.
The Wreck of the Hesperus.
Pilgrim's Progress.
Boredom.
If on liking this album I would recommend their eponymous first album and "Procol Harum Live in Concert with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra", which in my opinion includes the best live track ever, "Conquistador".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpeice, 28 Jan 2010
By 
Gerard A. Murphy "Murf the surf" (Springwood NSW Aust) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I recommend anyone with an interest in fine music to explore this album. The title track is one of the best pieces of popular music ever recorded and the bonus live tracks reveal a "very together" band really cooking.

For a band generally remembered for 2 or 3 songs at most I have always thought it a shame that they never really received the accolades they deserved but having seen the recent concert in Denmark and the live DVD at Union Chapel I think more people appreciate the music of Procol Harum than I realised. Check out these other albums to hear the variety of performances Procol Harum were able to deliverHome (40th Anniversary Series)Grand Hotel (40th Anniversary Series)Exotic Birds & Fruit (40th Anniversary Series)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I can only use 5 stars?, 23 Dec 2009
By 
A Customer (Santa Cruz, CA) - See all my reviews
40 years later, I still would place this album in my top ten of all time. Such a rich and varied album. Every song so distinct, yet it fits and flows gorgeously, and rocks, too: dirty, bluesy and funny.

Since so many have gone on and on about the fantastic opening title track, let's consider the second and the third. The Milk of Human Kindness begins with each instrument introduced solo -- piano, organ, guitar, until the star of the song, BJ Wilson's genius stop-&-start drumming, takes over and rides over and under Trower's psych-tone & textured guitar and lets Brooker's pounded-note piano surface occasionally to great effect. Great, great number.

Then Too Much Between Us switches the feeling so tenderly, with a vocal that's hard to believe is the same Gary B as the two songs before it. And that's the same guitarist? It is absolute gossamer. What is the instrument chiming like bells -- piano, vibes? Who cares? A third great number in a row.

And each to follow changes tone, style, thought so challengingly, rewardingly, originally and intelligently: the Caribbean bounce of Boredom, the gritty Juicy John Pink, the majestic Wreck of the Hesperus, the astonishing Trower vocal on Crucifiction Lane, the lovely closing of the circle on Pilgrim's Progress, Matthew Fisher's last hurrah in PH, as vocalist and organist, before handing the outro to Brooker's piano, Wilson's drumming, the flight of the vocals, the chiming of the bell and your own handclaps.

Since the following albums never really came close to this kind of sustained majesty again, much of the credit must go to organist Matthew Fisher who produced it, and then departed, as well as Brooker, whose unique vocals have always the marquee sound of Procol Harum, but who never sounded better than this, and Keith Reid's lyrics, bringing, as always, his completely unique approach to rock thought, but never as universal as on this album.

With Fisher's departure, the beginning of the long, slow, but slight, end commences. There were still years of grandeur to follow, but this was their peak. This album's ten tracks come together as a beautifully concise dose of greatness. You can and should find out for yourself. If you're at all interested in the possibilities of rock fulfilled, you'd be foolish not to.

The added tracks and terrific sound make this a worthwhile purchase for those who already know and love the work (especially the lyric-less version of Milk of Human Kindness), but the original album has never sounded less than revelatory to me these past decades. Now it just sounds better than ever.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The first one Salvo got right, 8 Nov 2009
Everything said about this album is true. It is a real Procol Masterpiece.

And this is the first Salvo release to live up to the promise. I sounds like you are in the control room listening to final mixdown. Wow, what a pleasure.

Full base and the strings sound smooth. Yum!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Time has not diminished it., 10 Oct 2009
By 
D. Bull "Bully." (West Midlands, UK.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I remember listening endlessly to this LP as a teenager. It had just come out and I was living in a scruffy bed-sit. I always thought it was unbelievably good. I recently purchased it on Amazon with tremendous trepidation. Time isn't always kind and some things from the sixties haven't aged well. Procol Harum certainly don't fall into that category. This sounds even better now than it did at the time, no doubt modern sound equipment plays a part but a tiny part. The real quality is in the song writing, musicianship, vocal virtuosity and imagination. A lot of modern day groups should listen to this and if it doesn't make them give up it might just inspire them to greater things. No doubt PH wouldn't win X Factor but who will remember any of the winners of that show in 40 months time never mind 40 years. Although they didn't have the amount of success some other sixties bands did, they deserve much more recognition than they get. Buy this album now. You won't regret it.
PS. Usual brilliant service from Amazon.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Long overdue, 12 Jun 2009
By 
John Foord "Frodo" (Tring Herts) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Should have bought it 40 years ago but couldn't afford it then. Well worth the wait though!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

A Salty Dog...Plus: Remastered
A Salty Dog...Plus: Remastered by Procol Harum (Audio CD - 1999)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews