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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Swinging quartet session
This is one of pianist McCoy Tyner's most famous records and features him with fellow Coltrane Quartet member, drummer Elvin Jones. The bass is played by the excellent Ron Carter whilst the only horn is played by tenor maestro Joe Henderson.
Whilst the expectations are likely to be music in the spirit of John Coltrane, Henderson is more his own man. The combination...
Published on 22 April 2005 by Ian Thumwood

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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not brilliant.
Perhaps I was expecting too much. I found this okay and will listen to it from time to time but it will not be at the top of my list. I have heard better from McCoy Tyner and will look for that to add to my collection.
Published 21 months ago by Mr Donal ONeill


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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Swinging quartet session, 22 April 2005
By 
Ian Thumwood "ian17577" (Winchester) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Real McCoy (Audio CD)
This is one of pianist McCoy Tyner's most famous records and features him with fellow Coltrane Quartet member, drummer Elvin Jones. The bass is played by the excellent Ron Carter whilst the only horn is played by tenor maestro Joe Henderson.
Whilst the expectations are likely to be music in the spirit of John Coltrane, Henderson is more his own man. The combination of Tyner and Jones has an interesting effect on tenor players and the meeting with Wayne Shorter on "Ju-Ju" (another classic) sees Shorter sounding more like Coltrane than on any other outing.
Here, Henderson pursues his unique and unorthodox style, his meandering approach hoovering up all the harmonic possibilities.
Of the five tracks it is true that the opening , modal, "Passion Dance" (based on two chords) and the mournful "Contemplation" are just the things Coltrane dug. However, the next track "Four by five" plays around with time signatures (still working out just how !) and is far more eubullient than anything Tyner recorded with his old boss. "Search for peace" is a beautiful ballad and the closing "Blues on the corner" has all the lopsided humour of Monk. And with Jones pushing things along from his drums, you can bet that the music really swings.
All in all, an enjoyable, if short CD. The only grumble is that the sound is not a great as some remastered Blue Notes, but don't let this put you off some fantastic music.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Passion & blues, 14 July 2011
By 
GlynLuke (York UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: The Real McCoy (Audio CD)
The title says it all. McCoy Tyner (happily still with us at 73) is one of the greatest, most consistent of jazz pianists, and this album tells you all you need to know about why that should be.
The two tracks that bookend this tremendous, easygoing yet always challenging disc have titles that might sum up this glorious music - Passion Dance and Blues On The Corner. Tyner never neglects emotion in his playing, nor does he forget for long the blues. The first two numbers here are classic expressions of both. Four By Five has a more exploratory, `modern jazz` vibe, giving the always to-the-point tenor sax of the splendid Joe Henderson plenty of room to roam.
Search For Peace (this was recorded in `67) is a suitably ruminative number by Tyner - as are all five selections - in which the pianist plays a solo to melt any heart, his accomplices entering into the spirit of the piece in complementary fashion, Henderson offering an unsentimental, beautifully phrased solo that leads into a gently cathartic fade-out. Lovely.
Blues On The Corner ends this perfectly remastered reissue on a very high note, leaving this sated listener wanting yet more of this enchanting music.
There are many dream teams on the jazz records that came from Blue Note in the 50s and 60s, and this one is one of the choicest. Ron Carter`s bass never lets you down,
the great, seemingly always available Elvin Jones graces any date, and Henderson is
luxury casting, a forever underrated player whose intelligent sax playing is always a boon, never a hindrance.
McCoy Tyner was and is one of the greats. Here`s why.
Exultant, classic jazz.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sublime McCoy Tyner, 16 July 2013
This review is from: The Real McCoy (Audio CD)
Previous reviews are all correct and I congratulate the authors. This is a towering achievement from one of the world's greatest jazz pianists. I very much enjoy McCoy Tyner's Blue Note period (this CD platforming his 1967-esque recordings); but I also put a flag in the sand for his progressive jazz-funk styling that cropped up on his superlative "Lookin' Out" LP featuring the iconic vocals of Phyllis Hyman. Ok - two completely different styles and eras but I think these illustrate the finesse of McCoy Tyner.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent mid-60s Blue Note quartet date, 16 Mar 2011
By 
Paul Bowes (Wales, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Real McCoy (Audio CD)
This is McCoy Tyner from 1967 - post-Coltrane, but still working here with Elvin Jones and adding Joe Henderson (tenor sax) and Ron Carter (bass). As one would expect from these musicians, the music is first-rate. All five compositions are by Tyner, and the best come in the first half.

A safe recommendation for anyone who likes mid-60s Blue Note, or wants to investigate outside the Miles Davis / John Coltrane axis. Worth comparing with the Joe Henderson quartet session 'Inner Urge' (1964), which also features Tyner and Jones. On 'The Real McCoy', we hear the Tyner who has become such a dominant influence in later jazz pianism.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not brilliant., 14 Jan 2013
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This review is from: The Real McCoy (Audio CD)
Perhaps I was expecting too much. I found this okay and will listen to it from time to time but it will not be at the top of my list. I have heard better from McCoy Tyner and will look for that to add to my collection.
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13 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!, 15 Oct 2003
This review is from: The Real McCoy (Audio CD)
I loved this album.
I really don't know that much about Jazz & Jazz musicians (note the distinct lack of Jazz 'buzzwords' & patter), but this album is fantastic.
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