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on 21 November 2005
The Pale Saints' second full-length release saw the vocal talent of Meriel Barham, ex Lush, brought in to supplement Ian Master's arguably rather weak voice. Fans' opinions were mixed on the introduction of the new member, often complaining that it made the Saints sound too much like her previous band. Masters continued to play bass and write most of the songs.
Released toward the end of the UK’s early 90's Shoe-Gazing scene, this album certainly garnered a lot of critical attention and easily overshadows the subsequent "Slow Buildings" LP that was recorded without Masters' creative influence.
"Comforts of Madness" remains many fans' favourite, but "In Ribbons" is in retrospect a much more cohesive and satisfying work. Apart from the stronger vocals, the album describes a strong arc across a theme of yearning & unrequited love whereas the previous release appeared to lack any compelling direction apart from a somewhat pessimistic view of the Human Condition.
Unfortunately the muddy and rather inept production brings Chris Cooper's competent but leaden drumming far too high in the mix and leaves the vocals mired in the background. If any album were ripe for remastering then this is it.
Stand-out tracks include the tuneful lament of "Thread of Light" and the compelling indie epics "Hunted" and "Featherframe".
A Must Buy of the 90's, despite its flaws.
0Comment|7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 October 2001
when this album was released in the mid nineties - the pale saints were already, commercially speaking a spent force. seen as 'shoegazing' bandwagon jumpers - the press had almost washed their hands of them. however for those who'd enjoyed the previous album and couldn't wait for a new my bloody valentine album (still bloody waiting!) - a treat was in store. in fact, of all the albums credited to the shoegazing scene this is one that still stands up as a bloody good record. From the pure visceral pop of the opening track through to the swooning, languid beauty of the last,this is an album that i can still play to this day - not as some nostalgia trip, but because this is an album that yeilds something new with each listen. which, lets face it is more than can be said for slowdive or chapterhouse...
22 comments|11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 November 2005
The Pale Saints' second full-length release saw the vocal talent of Meriel Barham, ex Lush, brought in to supplement Ian Master's arguably rather weak voice. Fans' opinions were mixed on the introduction of the new member, often complaining that it made the Saints sound too much like her previous band. Masters continued to play bass and write most of the songs.
Released toward the end of the UK’s early 90's Shoe-Gazing scene, this album certainly garnered a lot of critical attention and easily overshadows the subsequent "Slow Buildings" LP that was recorded without Masters' creative influence.
"Comforts of Madness" remains many fans' favourite, but "In Ribbons" is in retrospect a much more cohesive and satisfying work. Apart from the stronger vocals, the album describes a strong arc across a theme of yearning & unrequited love whereas the previous release appeared to lack any compelling direction apart from a somewhat pessimistic view of the Human Condition.
Unfortunately the muddy and rather inept production brings Chris Cooper's competent but leaden drumming far too high in the mix and leaves the vocals mired in the background. If any album were ripe for remastering then this is it.
Stand-out tracks include the tuneful lament of "Thread of Light" and the compelling indie epics "Hunted" and "Featherframe".
A Must Buy of the 90's, despite its flaws.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 February 2015
Love the first two tracks, worth it for those alone!
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