Customer Reviews


8 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars Number One with a Bullet!
Time has been kind to Grace Jones who co-wrote and co-produced most of the tracks on this 1989 album. The amalgam of styles on Bulletproof Heart sounds better than ever and it's not at all clear why some fans disliked this work when it was released. There's little of the menacing half-spoken vocals first introduced on Warm Leatherette and much real singing on a variety of...
Published on 19 July 2009 by Pieter Uys

versus
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 1989 Studio Album
Grace Jones rarely recorded in the mid to late 1980's and infact you could probably argue that her recording career reached its peak with the Trevor Horn produced Slave To The Rhythm album in 1985.

After her 1986 studio entry, Inside Story, which became only a moderate seller (though was devoured by her legion of gay male fans)no one quite knew what to expect...
Published on 14 Mar 2006 by Ian Phillips


Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 1989 Studio Album, 14 Mar 2006
By 
Ian Phillips (Bolton, Lancashire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bulletproof Heart (Audio CD)
Grace Jones rarely recorded in the mid to late 1980's and infact you could probably argue that her recording career reached its peak with the Trevor Horn produced Slave To The Rhythm album in 1985.

After her 1986 studio entry, Inside Story, which became only a moderate seller (though was devoured by her legion of gay male fans)no one quite knew what to expect next from her.

At the fall of 1989, Jones returned to the recording studios with producers Chris Stanley, David Cole and Robert Chivilles for the rather disjointed Bulletproof Heart album. Jones co-wrote the majority of songs along with singer Chris Stanley.

Bulletproof Heart (1989) like Inside Story (1986) was another foray into mainstream Pop, divulging into Funk, R&B and Dance. The project seemed more of an effort on Jones' part to catapult her back onto the club scene where she had enjoyed immense success in the late 70's.

Opening the album is the cool, Funk-driven Dance number, Driving Satisfaction which comes complete with swirling, synthesised effects and a vastly seductive, sexually charged performance from Jones. Driving Satisfaction becomes almost contagious after a couple of listens and emerges as one of the better tracks to be found scattered on Bulletproof Heart.

With the jamming affair of Driving Satisfaction, you would think the album would get better from here on but the whole project is something of a mixed affair with some highs and some lows.

Another anthem written by Jones and Chris Stanley, Kicked Around, features a ferocious, red-blooded Jones in sado-massachist (and extremely freaky) mode as she scowls through this tale of self-esteem, fighting back and getting even with ex-lovers. Her performance has spirit and fire though is a little on the frail side and at points nearly going out of tune. Still can't make up my mind whether this is compelling from its weird, off-the-wall manner or just complete utter dross. Either way you can almost feel Jones putting her whole heart and soul into the song.

The jamming Love On Top Of Love combines the songwriting talents of Jones and Chris Stanley with David Cole, one half of the early 90's Pop group C+C Music Factory who scored a hit with the catchy Things That Make You Go Hmmm. David Cole works his commercial-like magic on Jones for this fabulously funky, infectious Dance/R&B belter. Jones delivery is surprisingly strong and assertive. Though Love On Top Of Love enjoyed some club recognition, the track all the more surprisingly bombed on the mainstream charts.

The limitations of her thin, narrow singing surface on the droning sounds of Paper Plan whilst she delivers more gritty social commentary on the hip, trancey urban R&B number, Crack Attack on which Jones inserts herself effectively into the complex musical arrangements.

The monster title track, Bulletproof Heart alongside the superb Love On Top Of Love, is one of the recordings on the project that has such instant immediacy. From the thunderous opening intro (that vaguely resembles Michael Jacksons', The Way You Make Me Feel) to crashing musical effects, Jones ignites the track into a winner with her sassy performance that gels well into the over-all musical arrangements.

On My Way was far more intricate and mellow with haunting male backing vocals echoing throughout whilst Jones' delivery is easy-going and seamless whereas more upbeat is the so-so purley Pop-oriented, Dream.

Seduction Surrender has some spark and ignition in the musical arrangements but somehow seems lost in a ponderous production though nearly exactly the same could be said about Someone To Love. Someone To Love seems like its all about to come together and work but somehow doesn't sound fully formed where as Jones vocals are rather flat and far from enthusiastic.

Jones duets with Chris Stanley on the exotic late night R&B/Pop ballad, Don't Cry Freedom. Both are in good voice, though its Chris Stanley that surprisingly seems to hog the spotlight though there is still undeniable chemistry between these two singers on record. Even so, Don't Cry Freedom becomes slightly tedious once its reached the end of its second verse and the whole track doesn't seem to quite get off the ground.

The final track is the even drearier, Amado Mio. Opening with mellow and soothing sounds of the flamenco guirtar, the track then wildly steers direction turning into a manic, frantically arranged blend of pounding percussion, electric keyboards and a tenor saxophone solo. May sound good but its overly a bit of a mess and Jones does little to liven things up with a flat and slightly droning performance.

Bulletproof Heart (1989) was Grace Jones last fully conceived studio album. She seemed to have lost direction on the music scene even though in all fairness this did seem a highly self-concious and ambitious effort. Indeed there are highlights on the project but over-all its a rather pale reflection of past glories - just take a listen to her albums Warm Leatherette (1980) and Nightclubbing (1981) which were both pure masterpieces. Bulletproof Heart however, is perharps for completists only.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Number One with a Bullet!, 19 July 2009
By 
Pieter Uys "Toypom" (Johannesburg) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Bulletproof Heart (Audio CD)
Time has been kind to Grace Jones who co-wrote and co-produced most of the tracks on this 1989 album. The amalgam of styles on Bulletproof Heart sounds better than ever and it's not at all clear why some fans disliked this work when it was released. There's little of the menacing half-spoken vocals first introduced on Warm Leatherette and much real singing on a variety of power ballads and dynamic dance tracks. David Cole and Robert Clivilles of C + C Music Factory fame and Chris Stanley are the Sly & Robbie of this magnificent album.

With its fast funky rhythm, SFX of screeching tires and car horns plus swirling percussive patterns, Driving Satisfaction has just a hint of her risqué and notorious classic Pull Up To The Bumper from Nightclubbing. Still on the fast track, Kicked Around has Grace wailing like a soul or gospel belter, her voice reaching striking levels of intensity. The tempo slows down a bit for the bouncy Love On Top Of Love with its innovative arrangement that includes male voices weaving in & out of the mix and a segment of exotic percussion that sounds like the knocking of a poltergeist.

On the straight melodious ballad Paper Plan, Grace delivers the profound and poetic lyrics with aplomb before the polyrhythms bubble up again on Crack Attack which is introduced by a male rapper. With its edgy beat, synth bursts and rattling percussion that includes charming chirps, it's a tour de force. The impressively arranged title track with its prominent backing vocals and jerky rhythms boasts an arsenal of instruments including electric guitar and moaning sax, whilst the brooding ballad On My Way is the most experimental number containing a variety of samples, weird electronics, sweeping synthscapes and echoed vocals. It and the following track Seduction Surrender with its jungle drumming and eerie vocals most resemble the atmospheric electronics of the 2008 album Hurricane.

The aforementioned Paper Plan is joined by the equally tuneful and catchy ballads Someone To Love and Amado Mio, both of which count amongst the most memorable songs of her career. In seamless sequences of tenderness and exuberance, one moment Grace's voice soars on the rousing Someone To Love with its stirring melody, and the next she gets all soft and sensual again in whispered and spoken French. The majestic Amado Mio is the album's masterpiece. Introduced by a romantic dialogue between her sensitive singing and a spoken Spanish male vocal, the song explodes in a Wagnerian surge of hypnotic drums, skittering percussion and whistles that eventually alternates with softer segments of accordion and romantic French vocals, all held perfectly in place by Grace's vocal prowess.

The 2004 CD re-issue of Bulletproof Heart includes four additional tracks, of which the duet Don't Cry Freedom with Chris Stanley, the garage-house `Killer Kiss' remix of Love On Top Of Love and the Brazilian mix of Amado Mio are the best. A pop-dance album like its 1986 predecessor Inside Story, Bulletproof Heart may not be Jones' most experimental work but it remains an excellent album that has stood the test of time very well. If her fans knew they would have to wait 19 years for the follow-up, they probably would have appreciated it more.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars a game of one half, 12 Mar 2007
By 
Philip Solo (UK , Japan, or Thailand) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bulletproof Heart (Audio CD)
I am an absolute fan of Grace Jones and her stunning visual image and musical strength.. but have to say this of my preferred GC albums is lesser rated for me than Nighclubbing, Warm Leatherette, and Slave..

the first half is top Grace rock driving agressive pulsating and strong with BulletProof Heart title track, Driving Satisfaction, Love on top of Love all making this one of the best in car CDs in my collection but then it awkwardly mellows and ballads out into mish-mash over orchestrated production numbers like amado mio and dont cry freedom which to me sound like another of my least favorites...la vie on rose and such...wishy washy

I prefer Grace at her most ominous and in your face gangsta like My Jamaican Guy, Nightclubbing, Pull up to the Bumper.. and her sensuous Parisian tracks with that hint of danger.. the ponderously produced ballads here are skip material to me... ( my own views of course_ Not her best but worth it to me for the tracks i can strip for the I-Pod in the car!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Some great songs, 25 Dec 2004
By 
Pieter Uys "Toypom" (Johannesburg) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
Grace Jones co-produced most of the tracks on this 1989 album. Bulletproof Heart contains an amalgam of her styles and although not a classic, it is a strong work that will please her fans. With its funky rhythm, Driving Satisfaction has just a hint of her classic Pull Up To The Bumper and lovely swirling percussive patterns.
Kicked Around is closer to vocal pop, whilst Love On Top Of Love has a bouncy beat and innovative vocal arrangement. Crack Attack is a polyrhythmic dance number and the title track has a jerky rhythm and some marvellous sax. There are also beautiful tuneful ballads like Paper Plan, Someone To Love and Amado Mio. Her voice really soars on Someone To Love, a rousing ballad with a wonderful melody and some romantic French lyrics.
Amado Mio is the album's torch song and a fine example of her mastery of the genre. It has lovely accordion, a Spanish flavor and some French infusions. These aforementioned two songs should have been big bits and are amongst the highlights of her career.
Bulletproof Heart may not be Jones most innovative work but together with Inside Story, it remains a good album from the latter phase of her career that has stood the test of time very well.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Her Last? I Think Not, 21 Nov 2004
This review is from: Bulletproof Heart (Audio CD)
Grace Jones' final studio album to date is of a mixed bag of pure pop genius, but at the same time, also a victim of the 80's love for synthesizers and soulless percussion work. Grace Jones was somewhat of an Icon in the 80's, and her work with Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare of the early 80's is highly regarded, and her epic "Slave to the Rhythm," produced an envisioned by Trevor Horn, is every bit as influential and stunning. She left Island Records in the mid-80's, and after spending several of years dabbling in acting, returned to the music scene in 1986 with "Inside Story." The album spawned off one of her biggest hit singles in the US with "I'm Not Perfect (But I'm Perfect for You) but generally failed to establish the high ground she ruled in the early 80's. On this final studio album, Grace enlisted several of the greatest producers of the 80's: David Cole & Robert Clivilles; Jonathan Elias & Chris Stanely, Jones even served as a producer on many of the tracks. If the album sometimes seems hampered, it might have something to do with the overproduction. Jonathan Elias (who worked with Grace on the movie "Vamp"), produced three of the tracks on the album, and in usual Jonathan fashion, he brought a sense of relief on an otherwise dated, and often cheesy effort from Grace Jones. In fact, the best track on the album was produced by Elias; Amado Mio is a stunning rhythmic track that manages to blend everything that's exciting about Grace into one concoction; the European flavour and cool iciness, mixed with the rhythmic instrumentation of Elias own personal vision of Grace. David Cole & Robert Clivilles produced the album's hit, Love on Top of Love, and a remix of the song even managed to reach number one on the Billboard Dance Chart. Where the albums fails is in its dated use of drums and percussion, songs like "Paper Plan" and "Kicked Around" are embarrassing, and "Crack Attack" is no less accomplished. Something went horribly wrong during the production of the album, it might be the overproduction, or it might be its excessive use of drums and percussion, but either way, the album only succeeds when both issues agrees on which direction to take.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars AT LAST!.........A LONG OVERDUE REISSUE!, 7 Jun 2004
This review is from: Bulletproof Heart (Audio CD)
Ok, Ok, So it's not Grace Jones' finest moment. However, It does present a few hidden gems.
Being a Grace Jones Fan, I was first introduced to this album in 1990, a year after it's initial release. It took some getting used to, but after a few times, you will have certain tracks embedded in your memory.
I would say my favourites are Crack Attack, Love On Top Of Love, Don't Cry Freedom and Amado Mio.
On this latest reissue they have included two rather splendid remixes from the original 12" & CD Singles of Amado Mio and Love On Top Of Love. The "Killer Kiss Mix" of Love On Top Of Love is not bad at all. However, The "Brazillian Mix" of Amado Mio makes a refreshing change with regards to remixes.
A very good friend of mine who is soon to be only 24, who I of course introduced to Grace Jones, never tires of playing the original version of this CD. Especially CRACK ATTACK, PAPER PLAN and DREAMS! There are a few cheesy tunes on this CD... But it well worth it's rather modest 6.99 price tag. THANK YOU Grace Jones for letting younger and newer audiences appreciate your inimitable style of music.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bulletproof Heart. More like Bulletproof ear Drums!, 18 Jun 2004
By 
MR D P BOURROUGHS (croydon United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bulletproof Heart (Audio CD)
If I could sum this album up in one word that word would be 'fabulous'.
It may not be graces finest recording, indeed it could possibly be her worst however personally I love it.
I don't know whether it was Graces own idea, or the idea of one of her producers to decide to completely axe all of her credibility all in one go, but that's what they did. The result is quite possibly one of the cheesiest, cringeworthy albums of all time.
Being a cheesemeister, I love it. The best attempts on there are 'Dreams' [catch the game show introduction], 'Paper Plan' [ooh, just listen for the lyrics 'marriage of the heart' this is the most nauseating part of the album - wonderful], and 'Crack Attack' [this is a winner of a tune, Grace takes a drag of her 'blow' at the outset and from then on in the result is marvellous.]
I cannot recommend this album more highly, especially for those of you with a sense of humour. I play it incessantly. For true Grace fans it is essential, as all of her albums are - this may not be another Fame, or Portfolio but give it a go. There are also a couple of previously unreleased remixed on the end; these are not on the original I own but are worthy additions.
In short, please purchase this and have a laugh at Graces's expense. We may love her, but we'd prefer to laugh at her. Ho ho ho Ms Jones.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Amado Mio, 11 Dec 2004
By 
Pieter Uys "Toypom" (Johannesburg) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Bulletproof Heart (Audio CD)
Nineteen years elapsed between the release of Bulletproof Heart and Hurricane. On both Grace Jones acted as co-writer and co-producer. Bulletproof Heart's blend of styles has improved with age and it's not clear why some fans dissed this work when it was released in 1989. Robust & romantic singing replaces the menacing spoken delivery that appeared on, but by no means dominated, Warm Leatherette and Nightclubbing. BH consists of melodious power ballads and dynamic dance tracks courtesy of David Cole & Robert Clivilles and Chris Stanley who assume the role of Sly & Robbie on this magnificent album.

With its fast funky rhythm, Driving Satisfaction's screeching tire & car horn sound effects recall her risqué classic Pull Up To The Bumper from Nightclubbing, and the fast pace continues on Kicked Around where Grace wails like a soul or gospel pro, her voice conveying heartfelt emotion. The tempo slows somewhat for the buoyant Love On Top Of Love with its male voices weaving in & out of the mix and a snippet of echoing percussive raps that one associates with a séance.

On the grand ballad Paper Plan, Grace commands the stirring lyrics with aplomb; then the polyrhythms bubble up again on Crack Attack under the voice of a male rapper. An edgy beat, dramatic bursts of synth and percussion of the rattling & chirping variety make this one stand out. On the title track, prominent lead & backing vocals interact with an arsenal of instruments including electric guitar and squealing sax over jerky rhythms. In contrast, On My Way is a brooding ballad rendered other-worldly by a variety of samples, echoed vocals, sweeping synthscapes and electronic oddities whilst Seduction Surrender is built around jungle drumming and eerie vocals, not unlike a track or two on Hurricane.

The balladesque tracks includes the aforementioned Paper Plan and On My Way but Someone To Love and Amado Mio lift the album to stellar heights, being amongst the most memorable songs of her career. Tenderness alternates with exuberance on both - the rousing Someone To Love with its addicting melody and French infusions, and the majestic Amado Mio which is the album's masterpiece. This one opens with a dialogue where she sings in affirmation of a spoken Spanish male vocal whereafter the track erupts in a Wagnerian surge of thundering drums, skittering percussion and whistles that eventually gives way to softer segments of accordion and romantic French vocals, all falling perfectly in place through Grace's vocal prowess.

The 2004 CD re-issue of Bulletproof Heart includes four additional tracks, all good, although the duet Don't Cry Freedom with Chris Stanley and the Brazilian mix of Amado Mio are the glittering prizes. A pop-dance album like its 1986 predecessor Inside Story, Bulletproof Heart may not be Jones' most experimental work but it has grown in stature. I would suggest that Amado Mio alone is worth the price of the album.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xa8f865d0)

This product

Bulletproof Heart
Bulletproof Heart by Grace Jones (Audio CD - 1989)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews