Customer Reviews


14 Reviews
5 star:
 (10)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What the sixties sound like when you remove the hype
I love this album.
Now virtually forgotten (and not particularly well known even in its day), "Village Green" the finest forty minutes of one of the cornerstones of the British hit parade. But, there's not one hit single here... nothing you're going to recognise from all those "Best of the Kinks" collections, and nothing that's ever going to be played on Radio 2...
Published on 6 April 2003 by Superleccy

versus
4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not quite there
I bought this album after buying 'Arthur' as it is always trumped as the best Kinks album. Well... I disagree. I think that the first 10 songs are good, but there's a lot of psychedelic twiddlings on the other songs which don't really work.
Don't get me wrong, the title track is excellent and stands out, as well as '...Walter?' but for me, it doesn't quite gel as...
Published on 9 Sep 2003 by Mr A Bland


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What the sixties sound like when you remove the hype, 6 April 2003
By 
This review is from: The Village Green Preservation Society: Remastered (Audio CD)
I love this album.
Now virtually forgotten (and not particularly well known even in its day), "Village Green" the finest forty minutes of one of the cornerstones of the British hit parade. But, there's not one hit single here... nothing you're going to recognise from all those "Best of the Kinks" collections, and nothing that's ever going to be played on Radio 2. The closest you may have come to hearing this album could be hearing its grandson, Blur's "Parklife".
There are many who make Pepper-esque comparisons, crying about what this album "could have been". Think of it the other way round... if you take away the producers, the art departments and the marketeers, this is what you end up with. Raw beauty.
Within five years, some naff boy band will cover "Big Sky" or "Starstruck" for the soundtrack of some movie starring Hugh Grant, and it will stay at number one for an entire summer. Imagine how bad you're gonna feel if you don't discover this album before that happens. Buy it now, and discover that The Kinks made classic albums, not just classic singles.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Underrated yet arguably the best 60s album they made, 14 Sep 2000
This review is from: The Village Green Preservation Society: Remastered (Audio CD)
The end of the 60's saw a difficult time for the kinks. Pete Quaife the bassist was looking to leave the group making VGPS his his final album. It was the title track that did it for me. Superb song writing from Davies as he provides a social commentary of English life with talk of old pubs and English novels. The strong riff backed up well with the rock organ is truly something else not to mention the wailing harmonies and Ray's prominent majestic voice particulalry at the end. Also this song almost predicts the future for English culture with the mention of American stars such as Donald Duck. In a way its almost as though Davies' sensed the move towards America. Other great songs are Big Sky, Walter, Animal farm and Mr Songbird. Although on sales the album did not score it has been said by many that it was their greatest album! I think as fans the appropriate word would be `if only' but despite lack of success its a great album! Spread the word. Enjoy!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The greatest concept album in British Pop, 13 Dec 2004
By 
Danny Neill (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Village Green Preservation Society: Remastered (Audio CD)
That one of rocks greatest ever concept albums, released by the Kinks during the ultimate era for grand album-long statements, should sink without trace is just one of the many vagaries of success in the pop world. Sure enough, the band did score some chart success in 1968 with the non-LP single 'Days', but the resulting concept album from the sessions that had spawned that track failed to make any impact on the national consciousness. It would take a radical shift in position, moving to a more US radio friendly rock sound, to keep the Kinks fortunes afloat through the 1970s.
Why the Kinks masterpiece seemed, on paper at least, to fail is something of a mystery. It is that rare piece, an album with a basic concept that carries itself for the duration; maintaining a central theme in both its musical texture and through the various character snapshots and sub-plots that the Ray Davies narrative portrays like an aural abstract painter. It arrived on the back of a 3-4 year period, in which The Kinks had endured a ban from touring the US - and so had set about refining that quintessentially English grain of song-writing that has remained their trademark. This album was the logical conclusion of that journey, and its status as the defining Kinks record has been cemented by its enduring influence on the Britpop generation of the 1990's and beyond.
In reality, the reason it was ignored is probably because up to that point, the band had played the game in the UK singles market with such accomplished success that the albums were rather overshadowed. The Kinks really were the UKs definitive singles act (apart from The Beatles) and maybe people didn't expect them to be ploughing so much of their creativity into an album. Preconceptions do count for a lot, even amongst the bands record label, who apparently were guilty of gross under-selling on their product.
And yet, all of this counts for little, because well into its fourth decade, this album is still selling, still being discovered by new devotees - propelled with a word of mouth momentum by those in the know. Now in the 21st century, I predict its stature will continue to rise, for it stands as an incredible snapshot of a period in post war history. The albums themes centre around a longing for old values and traditions in an ever changing modern world - feelings that resonate strongly in the 21st century. That the piece is delivered by a man with a genius for melody and lyrical observation lends it a depth that will ensure the record never slides into meer nostalgia. Ray Davies has his tongue firmly in cheek, he knows that times have to change and finds much pathos and humour in the way we all fight it, all the while creating such vivid images of a period in history that reveal he too is secretly longing for things to stay the way they were.
There are no valid reasons not to own this album. It's a Britpop classic, a musical opus of the highest calibre, written and performed by Ray Davies and The Kinks at the peak of their powers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Pastoral Triumph, 29 Jan 2003
By 
J. Skade "joeskade" (London, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Village Green Preservation Society: Remastered (Audio CD)
You will have to search hard amongst the plethora of greatest album lists produced by the glossier music magazines in the last few years before you find this album and yet it remains one of the pinnacles of pop/rock. Unlike Sgt Pepper it has not lost any of its charm - it is fresh and relevant and very, very listenable.
The album was originally intended to consist of twelve tracks including the hit single 'Days' (one of the most beautiful tracks ever to grace the charts). Then Ray Davies changed his mind, pulling 'Days' and 'Mr Songbird' and adding five new tracks bringing the total to fifteen. And all first rate.
The title track sets the gentle pastoral tone of the album as well as setting out two of its central themes, conservation and nostalgia. It is a witty list song of the kind Ian Dury was to make a career of, with some outrageous rhymes. It could have been a single. As could 'Do You Remember Walter' an affectionate but sad look at schoolboy memories. The album contained other tracks just as strong. 'Animal Farm' continuing the pastoral theme is another missed opportunity in the singles department, this one a sure fire hit, as the song is in the grand Kinks tradition. 'Monica' a delicious calypso flavoured love song (to a woman of the night) that will stay in your head for days. 'All of My Friends Were There' is a nightmare song out of music hall via Gilbert and Sullivan. And then there's 'Starstuck' and 'Big Sky' and 'Johnny Thunder' the great comic book hero who was to return later in the Kinks' career. 'Last of the Steam Powered Trains' is musically a nod to their Rhythm and Blues roots which oddly but quite effectively continues the very English strain of nostalgia. And there is more...
If the OK Computers and Revolvers and Neverminds and Dark Sides of this world can't all shift seats to make room for this masterpiece there is no justice.
The cd contains both the fifteen track (mono) album plus the original twelve track selection (in stereo and as released in Europe) plus the mono mix of 'Days' for good measure. the inevitable duplication suggests that this release is aimed at the established fans (who must, to be fair, account for a sizeable chunk of the sales) but the album should really be purchased by every music lover. The Kinks produced other very fine albums, but none with quite such consistent brilliance. Along with a good singles compilation (the 'Essential Kinks' perhaps) this is the indispensible Kinks purchase.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best kept secret of the 60's british music scene, 21 Jan 2000
By 
TheJonesBoy "TheJonesBoy" (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Village Green Preservation Society: Remastered (Audio CD)
Having invented heavy metal by virtue of slashing a speaker cone with a razor blade and winding up the guitars for the perfect riff on 'you really got me' the Kinks then came up with this absolute classic. This album will show what Blur tried (and failed) to do, and whilst the Brit-pop tag is a cheap journalists tag, if anything is British and Pop then this is it. As classic as Summer-time strawberries and china cups, this is without doubt a top 5 all-time LP. GET IT.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars God save little shops, china cups and virginity, 10 Feb 2004
This review is from: The Village Green Preservation Society: Remastered (Audio CD)
Well firstly, here's a little query. How can an album that contains only one song from the best of collection that everyone owns possibly be a Kinks album that you should own? Well, to be fair, that singles collection that everyone owns doesn't have the Eighties bittersweet account of romance and impending adulthood "Come Dancing" either, so maybe not every moment of glory ends up on a Best Of.
The opening track sets the scene perfectly, we are entering into a world celebrating the small marvels of the world, the idiosyncracies of the British and also the fear of passing time. All that and it's funny as hell too. Only the Kinks would dare to rhyme English-speaking vernacular with 'Moriarty and Dracula'. It has all the oomph, dash and sing-along of its cousin of similar name from the Italian job 'The Self-Preservation Society'
We then proceed to the Kinks just smacking home-run after home-run (or really six after six, a la Garfield Sobers). Walter captures the closeness of adolescent friendships while at the same time showing how such friendships decay and have nothing much to offer you in adolescence, Johnny Thunder the way oldfashioned comics and stories could pull you into their world, Last of the Steam-Powered Trains linking American blues into Hornby, Animal Farm and Village Green neat little vignettes of rural life. Big Sky is frankly amazing, you just can't work out what effect they have put on Davies' voice, but he sounds detached and otherworldly and though the lyrics are simple, they are written with a compelling and interesting perspective.
It is true that with Phenomenal Cat, we go rather off the rails and I can't make up my mind whether I adore or loathe All of My Friends Were There - it is sung in an old-fashioned music-hall style with swooping vocals and it is either marvellous or ridiculous depending on your mood. But at least they tried it.
And to be honest, Sgt Peppers has Lovely Rita Meter Maid AND When I'm Sixty-Four, so it is acceptable for a great album to have a bit of a shaky patch.
Blur were very sneaky in trying to rip this off without acknowledging it. The Kinks produce an album you can sing along to, or sit quietly and think about. And the title track will be bouncing round your head for days after you've heard it. It is really a four-and-a-half, well worth the money (even if my housemates asked me whether it was by the people who did Lilly the Pink)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The alluring charms of cranberry pie, 3 May 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Village Green Preservation Society: Remastered (Audio CD)
For those who still think that The Kinks are "a fairly good pop group of the days of The Beatles, commanded by this guy who composed 'You really got me' and 'Lola'", the unprejudiced listening of this absolute gem should be mandatory. Instead of too much eagerness for being 'progressive', often at the expense of musical ideas, which was sadly common at the time when this marvel was released, they will find a superb blend of skeptical fun, sprightly madness, lyrical tenderness, sympathetic irony and above all, an ever-surprising spring of musical freshness, inspiration and wit. Beware of this record if you think that rock music must always be harsh and brawny. On the contrary, if you are capable of appreciating the charm of a pretendedly na´ve story in which people have cranberry pie on a lawny plot of idyllic English countryside, narrated with the resources of music-hall combined with the forwardness of rock, then you will agree with me that this album is far above anything it may be compared with, including some super-famous conceptual productions of the sixties.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply the Greatest, 10 Aug 2000
This review is from: The Village Green Preservation Society: Remastered (Audio CD)
If anyone thought that 60's music ends with the Beatles please listen to this. Although considered an album that more people talk about than have actually listened to, this album is surely up there with anything produced in modern music. Completely removed from the 60's scene, this is an album that is essential for any music lover.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We'll sit and laugh and talk about the village green., 11 Feb 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Village Green Preservation Society: Remastered (Audio CD)
The sheer beauty of this album makes you reminisce of dreams that were never real. Imagine an album that opens your mind to drinking by the riverside, with friends of old and new. An album of loves labours and the happiness of playing on 'Animal Farm'. An album that was way ahead of it's time yet went back in time.
This experimental album is the 60's defined at it's finest, but it knows how to work it's way into you and it'll play a part in every summer for the rest of your life. Undoubtedly underrated, supremely beautiful. If you don't buy this album you're missing out... be part of the 'Village Green Preservation Society', it'll improve your life!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars I REMEMBER WALTER, 17 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Village Green Preservation Society: Remastered (Audio CD)
EXCELLENT ALBUM.TAKES ME BACK TO MY CHILDHOOD IN THE SIXTYS WHEN BANDS ACTUALLY PLAYED THIER OWN
INSTRUMENTS IN HARMONY.

WALTER ORMISTON,REGENTS PARK,LONDON
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews