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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The man's a genius, 14 Feb 2005
This review is from: Songs For A Tailor (Audio CD)
I had this album on vinyl and hadn't listened to it for years, so my first reaction was surprise that it still stands up so well. Liberated from Cream, Jack Bruce could finally do what he wanted, with that fabulous bass to the fore, driving the melody as well as the rhythm. Great songs that are still different and challenging, and the added delight of Jon Hiseman's drumming on a few tracks. The bonus tracks are also enlightening, especially the almost punk Clearout and the Ministry of Bag demo. The uninitiated may take a few hearings to get into it, but persevere, it's worth it.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A genuine forgotten classic, 8 Aug 2001
By 
Mr P "radletteer" (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Songs for a Tailor (Audio CD)
Recorded after the demise of Cream this album highlights the phenomenal compositional and vocal skills of the young Jack Bruce. The main players alongside Bruce are guitarist Chris Spedding and drummer Jon Hiseman. The album is full of fairly short succinct songs of great rhythm, unexpected twists and real invention. One of the greatest albums of all time. Not many people know that. Lots of albums are bestowed with the classic tag, most are over rated.This is the genuine article. For those with open, enquiring minds and want something more than the much touted, commercial and bleeding obvious.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Way better than Clapton, 11 Dec 2007
By 
David Dixon - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Songs For A Tailor (Audio CD)
Whilst Eric Clapton sank into well-paid mediocrity Jack Bruce showed with this album that he was interested first and foremost in the music. Wildly creative, always well played and often edgy, this is a classic album whcih deserves a revival.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It just doesent get any better than this., 6 Aug 2001
By 
This review is from: Songs for a Tailor (Audio CD)
Jack has been a great influance on other artists as a bass player from when he played with John Mayall. Together with Clapton and Baker in Cream he helped change the way Blues were played and understood. When this album was first released it proved to me what a brilliant artist he was. It covers Jazz Blues Fusion like nothing else of its time. Today its still hits the spot.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Album, 4 July 2007
This review is from: Songs For A Tailor (Audio CD)
I remember when this album came out in vinyl many years ago after Jack Bruce left Cream. Being a big fan of the supergroup and alot younger then, I wasn't sure when I first heard it, however, having matured and broadened my musical outlook, I love it now. Jack's jazz influence is clear and there is a certain bluesy feel to it as well.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Theme for an imaginary heaven, 15 July 2003
By 
Mr P "radletteer" (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Songs For A Tailor (Audio CD)
Recorded after the demise of Cream this album highlights the phenomenal compositional and vocal skills of the young Jack Bruce. The main players alongside Bruce are guitarist Chris Spedding and drummer Jon Hiseman. The album is full of fairly short succinct songs of great rhythm, unexpected twists and real invention.
One of the greatest albums of all time.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Debut" solo album classic effort, 1 May 2007
By 
Wayne Klein "If at first the idea is not absu... (My Little Blue Window, USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Songs For A Tailor (Audio CD)
After the break up of Cream Jack Bruce dove right into his second solo album (his first was an instrumental album that was released after this one). "Songs for a Tailor" features a couple of tracks written for Cream (but unrecorded or rejected)along with a strong group of new originals that Bruce wrote with his lyricist Pete Brown.

"Never Tell Your Mother She's Out of Tune" shows Bruce's love of jazz with its unusual time signature and interesting horn arrangement. It features exceptional guitar playing by George Harrison. "Theme From an Imaginary Western" with its dominating sound of piano sounds unlike anything that Cream recorded. Although it sounds a bit like The Band, the music was actually written BEFORE The Band had recorded their first album back in 1963. "Tickets to Waterfalls" features nice piano and bass playing by Bruce along with a terrific vocal. "Weird of Hermiston" with its opening descending piano riff sounds nothing what you might expect from the title. This song was originally written for Cream (and there is a demo of it on the Cream box set "Those Were The Days").

The strangest song is the closer "The Clearout" (which was also written by Bruce/Brown for Cream to record and, again, there is a Cream demo on the box set). One could easily imagine Cream releasing this inspite of the subdued guitar work of the usually impressive Chris Spedding--one could imagine both Spedding if allowed to (and Clapton still in his prime)tearing this song up with a killer solo. The band includes Spedding, Bruce (who plays bas, piano, guitar, organ on the album) drummer Jon Hiseman and some nice sax playing by Dick Heckstall.

The reissue includes extensive liner notes about Bruce's career, the recording of the album and comments from Bruce and his lyricist Pete Brown. We also get full musician credits for the album. The bonus tracks are largely made up of alternate mixes and a demo. The best outtake here is the alternate mix of "Ministry of Bag" with tasty guitar work by Chris Spedding that left off the final version from the original album.

The album sounds terrific--the remastering engineer Paschal Byrne and co-ordinating producer Mark Powell have avoided the temptation to compress the heck out of the recording and make it louder to make it sound "more contemporary". As a result the dynamic range is very good throughout the album and these two have also been very respectful of the outtakes as well assembling them carefully with an eye towards providing fans with sometime a bit different. I'd highly recommend this which, along with "Harmony Row" and Bruce's 2003 return "More Jack Than God" represents Bruce in peak form as a songwriter/singer/player.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everything Is Peaches but the Cream, 30 Jun 2003
This review is from: Songs For A Tailor (Audio CD)
Some saw the release of this album as commercial suicide.
Fresh from his stint with the original supergroup, Cream, Jack's
first solo album is not quite what you would expect.
Gone are the extended forays into improvisation and the whacked out wah wah guitar solos.
In their place is a set of short,tight, punchy songs, exemplified by the opener, NEVER TELL YOUR MOTHER SHE's OUT OF TUNE.
Accompanied in the main by John Marshall on drums and Chris Spedding on guitar, the band weave their way around Jack's sinuous vocals to create a sound which was hardly synonimous with the acid daze of the late sixties.
Two of the songs, THEME FROM AN IMAGINARY WESTERN and ROPE LADDER TO THE MOON, covered by Mountain and Colosseum respectively, are instant classics.
The rest is beautufully performed mutated rythem & blues.
Perhaps not as intriguing as it's follow up HARMONY ROW, this is possibly THE great overlooked album of the sixties.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Melodic, 5 Sep 2009
By 
I. Gillespie (Bishop's Stortford, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Songs For A Tailor (Audio CD)
I did have the original vinyl record but that was long ago; I had forgotten how melodic Jack's bass was and you can lose yourself just riding his playing. Great writing with weird words from Pete Brown of course.
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5.0 out of 5 stars when jack met pete, 12 July 2014
This review is from: Songs For A Tailor (Audio CD)
I first went south in 1964 . I was a stranger in a strange land where the streets were paved with dog turds and angels wept in dark alleys . On my first night in Guildford my landlord took me to the Wooden Bridge for a pint . There was live music from a Glasgow trad band and the ginger bass player seemed pretty good . Not long afterwards I came across the ginger again - this time he had a large boil on his neck and was playing amazing bass guitar and shouting the blues with Graham Bond . I came across Pete Brown a few years later - he was a poet and would come to Newcastle to work with Tom Pickard at Morden Tower . He would come to the Collingwood and had the habit of falling in love with every girl he met . He had written lyrics for Cream but it was only after that band's inevitable disintegration that Pete and Jack began to seriously work together . This album was the glorious result of that short lived partnership . Poets understand the power of words and every song on this disc packs a punch . The band play like they have just got out of jail . Jack sings powerfully with his trademark tinge of Celtic melancholy . His bass playing is the best you will hear this side of jazz greats like Ron Carter , Dave Holland and Charlie Haden . Truly a classic album .
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Songs for a Tailor
Songs for a Tailor by Jack Bruce (Audio CD - 1997)
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