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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Album - Ever (If you like prog rock)
Firstly, ignore the extra tracks, I'm reviewing this as it originally came out on LP record.
As an IQ fan you either love this album, or you hate it.
It marked a 90deg change in the band's direction as a result of Peter being replaced by Paul. Some people might argue that Peter was not good enough a vocalist, on their early albums. Others might think that Peter...
Published on 17 May 2004 by Leslie A Munday

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars IQ Jim, but not as we know it!!!
In 1986, IQ found themselves with a new singer, P.L. Menel after the departure of Peter Nicholls. By the end of the year, they'd toured the UK with a rejuvenated Magnum, headlined their own major show at London's Piccadilly Theatre and signed a record deal with Phonogram. The big time beckoned.
'Nomzamo' shows IQ moving away from the more conceptual, episodic,...
Published 19 months ago by Stotty


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Album - Ever (If you like prog rock), 17 May 2004
This review is from: Nomzamo (Audio CD)
Firstly, ignore the extra tracks, I'm reviewing this as it originally came out on LP record.
As an IQ fan you either love this album, or you hate it.
It marked a 90deg change in the band's direction as a result of Peter being replaced by Paul. Some people might argue that Peter was not good enough a vocalist, on their early albums. Others might think that Peter added a unique sound to the band.
Either way, you cannot compare this, or the other Paul album, Are You sitting Comfortably, to any other IQ stuff. Paul menal gave the band the ability to create the more commercial songs with his great voice. There is no way Peter could sing half the stuff on this album.
If you listen to this without any preconceptions, there is no denying this album stands out as one of the best albums ever made. If you love progressive rock, you may well criticise this for being way too commercial. But it is no more commercial than similar bands of the time, marillion for example.
If you are a fan of early 80's neo-prog rock, this is the ultimate album. If you prefer the uncommercial side of prog rock, with long 20 minute songs that contain at least 2 solos from every band member, then get Subterranea, IQs next best album.
P.S. Ironic, that the US site gives this album 5 reviews and the UK site 1.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars IQ Jim, but not as we know it!!!, 10 May 2013
By 
Stotty (Bolton, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Nomzamo (Audio CD)
In 1986, IQ found themselves with a new singer, P.L. Menel after the departure of Peter Nicholls. By the end of the year, they'd toured the UK with a rejuvenated Magnum, headlined their own major show at London's Piccadilly Theatre and signed a record deal with Phonogram. The big time beckoned.
'Nomzamo' shows IQ moving away from the more conceptual, episodic, swirling prog approach of their first couple of albums in favour of a cleaner, more streamlined sound. The result is an album of upbeat, contemporary rock with some proggy undertones here and there.
Opening number 'No Love Lost' is actually reminscent of 'Squonk' from Genesis's 'Trick of the Tail' album and the overall simplicity of the number, as well as the catchy melody sets the pace for the rest of the album. It's an ok track but it's a shame that Martin Orford's closing keyboard solo fades out just as it's hitting its stride.
'Promises' follows next and sounds like IQ paying some major homage to Journey and Foreigner with an irresistable pop-rocker. This approach continues with tracks like 'Passing Strangers' and the frankly awful 'Screaming', which takes the commerciality way too far in my opinion. The ballad 'Still Life' is the most forgettable track on the album for me.
'Nomzamo' does contain some big numbers that tip the hat towards IQ's prog credentials. The title track has a tribal percussion feel with topical lyrics that deal with apartheid. It's a slow burning song that has some good atmosphere.
'Human Nature' is another larger scale number and shows the band very much in their comfort zone with some complex time signatures, changes of pace and some good instrumental sections.
My favourite track on 'Nomzamo' is the closing track 'Common Ground'. It's an emotionally charged tale of the battle of the Somme with Menel giving arguably his strongest vocal performance on the album. It's a cracking finale, which calls to mind 'Nude' era Camel.
The bonus tracks are forgettable. 'Colourflow' is a cliched ballad/duet that has no place in the IQ back catalogue. The acoustic/piano version of 'No Love Lost' is ho hum and the live recording of 'Common Ground' is too muddy sounding to warrant inclusion here.
'Nomzamo' is the sound of a band on a bigger record label. The production is crisper and slicker than previous albums, the keyboard sounds are more contemporary and there are a number of radio/chart/car friendly moments. P.L. Menel's vocals are impressive at times, but are way too much of an American style arena rock persuasion for my taste. Lyrically, he seems to roll out just about every rock cliche you can think of with some toe-curling results. I far prefer Peter Nicholls' more theatrical, bleeding-hearted, Gabriel-esque vocal style and storytelling lyrical approach.
'Nomzamo' didn't really set the world on fire in the UK and US as hoped with hard-core fans not really taking kindly to the new approach. That being said, the album opened the door to success in Europe.
It's a record very much of it's time and taken on its own, it's an entertaining listen that fans of the 1980s output of bands like Genesis, Yes, Rush and It Bites will probably love.
For me, it's a bit of a guilty pleasure. It's just hard to process the fact that the same band released 'The Wake' only two years prior, albeit with Peter Nicholls at the helm.
Ok, but not essential.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars prog rock eighties style, 21 July 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Nomzamo (Audio CD)
IQ were on the verge of greatness following the classic albums'The Wake'and'Tales From The Lush Attic'.I well remember keenly anticapating this release at the time.Was I dissappointed? A little it has to be said.Although the playing of all 5 band members is up to scratch the songs just seemed bland next to the dark brooding intensity of their earlier work. However years pass and I now think this to be one of IQ's best efforts.The songs far from beingbalnd actually carry tremendous emotional depth. The title track is about apartheid and is beautifully sung .I particularly like the use of rythym and tixture.For me one of IQ's finest.There are other 'goodies' as well. 'No Love Lost' is a soaring 'Pomp Rocker' sounding a bit like Led Zeps'Kashmir'.'Human Nature' is the longest track at about 10 mins .This is a finely constructed peice that is never over the top featuring a very tight performance from all.There is also my favourite track on the album 'Common Ground' featuring a wonderful guitar solo and emotive lyrics about war and the resultant human wastage.Unfortunately there are some weak tracks'Promises' sounds like a poor Fleetwood Mac rip-off while 'Screaming'has daft lyrics although livened up by some enthusiastic drumming.'Still Life' is quite ballady and dreamy sounding but not my cup of tea really.There are some bonus tracks here the best of which is a brilliant acoustic version of 'No Love Lost' featuring just piano and vocals.'Colourflow' is an excrutiating love duet while there is also a live version of 'Common Ground' which sounds like the studio version but withinferior production values.Overall this album is worth getting for the good tracks although it falls slightly short of future releases'Ever' and 'Subteranea'
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars nomzamo by iq., 1 Feb 2010
By 
G. Milne (edinburgh scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Nomzamo (Audio CD)
typical 80,s music.. mix of genesis and marillion, dont really know why iq
weren,t bigger. great album
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