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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Throw away the fillers and its stupendous
Husker Du signed off in early 1987 with this double album which weighs in at 20 tracks and 66 minutes - this from a band who released a double album in 1983 (the innovative eclectic Zen Arcade), two seperate albums in 1985 (the awesome punky New Day Rising and the similarly impressive Flip Your Wig), and then their major label debut, the slightly less thrilling, but still...
Published on 12 Feb 2003 by Martin

versus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good album - awful production
I would easily give this album 4 or maybe even 5 stars on the strength of the songs but the production is truly horrible. Everything sounds so thin and feeble apart from perhaps the vocals which are higher in the mix and have seem to have some heart behind them. It's shame because if you hear these songs on the live album (highly recommended) they sounds so much more...
Published 10 months ago by kaysen


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Throw away the fillers and its stupendous, 12 Feb 2003
By 
This review is from: Warehouse Songs and Stories (Audio CD)
Husker Du signed off in early 1987 with this double album which weighs in at 20 tracks and 66 minutes - this from a band who released a double album in 1983 (the innovative eclectic Zen Arcade), two seperate albums in 1985 (the awesome punky New Day Rising and the similarly impressive Flip Your Wig), and then their major label debut, the slightly less thrilling, but still enjoyable Cany Apple Grey. Part of the reason why they were so prolific is that, like Lennon & McCartney, Bob Mould and Grant Hart split the songwriting more or less 50-50, effectively making it feasible to split this into 2 seperate albums.
The Bob MOuld offering is lyrically very mature, offering missives about being stoodf up by the lover you should've dumepd ages ago (Standing in the Rain), being stuck in a position you need to escape (Up In the Air, featuring the memorable lyric "is love another way to count the things you haven't got?"), trying to salvage a relationship (the grower Turn In Around) and Friend You've Got To Fall, an apparent attack on Grant Hart, as they did not like each other one bit by the end of the band. However, for me the best of Bob's 11 tracks are These Important Years - "revelations seem to be another way to make the days run faster anyway", the single Could You Be The One? and the lyrically interesting Bed Of Nails.
Grant Hart provides most of the louder moments, although the commercial sheen to the production keeps things a long way away from the stuff on SST. His finest pop song ever, She's A Woman (And Now He Is A Man) is an extremely catchy piece which, along with the Mould tracks mentioned, makes for a fine final quarter of the album. Too Much Spice looks at the effects of overdoing life and finishing up empty and joyless, which seems rather autobiographical. There is a jazzy influence to much of his work here, especially She Floated Away and Tell You Why Tomorrow, while the rather unexciting Actual Condition attempts a 50s sound. Charity, Chastity, Prudence and Hope is a great opening to his set of songs, a tale anyone who's attempted to rise up from nothing can relate to.
So, how does it all ahng together? Very well. In places, the tracks appear to be rivalling each other, with similar-themed tracks side by side so as to emphasise the divided nature of the group. While a few tracks aren't up to much, they can easily be programmed out, and there's still 50 minutes of fine rock on show.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Husker Du Done and Dusted, 18 April 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Warehouse Songs and Stories (Audio CD)
Husker Du were one of the most prolific and influential bands to emerge from the US in the eighties. This, their seventh album in little over five years, is a fitting testament to their intense, but melodic hardcore sound. The songwriting chores are split pretty much evenly between Bob Mould and Grant Hart, and explore familiar themes of alienation, loneliness, helplessness and lost love. Yet despite the less than cheerful subject matter the music is always uplifting, from the album opener "These Important Years" to "You Can Live At Home", with Grant Hart screaming that, despite everything, running away from home may not be the answer.
This was supposed to be the record that would break Husker Du yet it ended with them breaking up, after the suicide of their manager, David Savoy. A shame really, because this is a melodic, literate, intelligent album that manages to be sad without being depressing- and, for those that care about such things, it rocks big time.
Bob Mould acheived greater success with Sugar, but this was when he was at his creative peak. Warehouse: Songs and Stories deserves a wider audience, make yourself a part of it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Husker Du's best, 14 Aug 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Warehouse Songs and Stories (Audio CD)
There are two Husker Du's - the hardcore, post-punkers on SST Records in the early '80s, and the more refined, commercial sounding, but still punky band of the late '80s. This ranks alongside 'Zen Arcade' as Husker Du's best album. Although Grant Hart's songwriting on 'Warehouse...' is a little out of sync.... Bob Mould's songwriting is still as good as it always was. The top songs on this cd are 'Ice Cold Ice', 'Could You Be The One?' and 'Too Much Spice'. All in all, 'Warehouse: Songs And Stories' is a brilliant swansong from a brilliant band. One of the best albums of the 80s.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A treat for any listener, 11 July 2003
This review is from: Warehouse Songs and Stories (Audio CD)
Ok lets get things clear, I'm one of those listeners who go into deep research when listening to lyrics; but with Warehouse I still havent even read inside the sleave, I got it, played and never looked back, it is just so listenable, you'll get hooked immediately - beautiful melodies and vocals
I picked up Warehouse after I heard James Dean Bradfield (Manic's guitar/vocals) found them to be an influence when he was younger.
Some may say Warehouse isnt what Husker were all about; which is kinda true, they were punk to begin with; but whats the point in getting older and still singing about the same youthful rants?...Husker matured and produced an album that is so listenable yet passionate - and not to mention inspiring, it really opened up my eyes to various playing styles and profound melodies.
I wont go into detail, but the stand out tracks for me are;
Charity, Chastity, Prudence and Hope (great percussion)
Standing in the Rain,
Ice cold Ice,
Its not peculiar (I love the chorus melody - so original)
Up in the air (loving this track too)
All tracks are a treat (really I'm serious)..all are individual with multiple glorious aspects,
Its also a special feeling to know of Husker Du and their work during this age ...its a relief to hear a band with such orignality from over a decade ago..
A pure treat, start to finish
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great songs in the Warehouse, 1 May 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Warehouse Songs and Stories (Audio CD)
As most people will now know this was the Huskers final album, but what a way to end a band! "Warehouse..." is probably the band's best album - and certainly their most accessible. The CD was originally a double album and bosts 20 songs off which only one is below par ("Turn It Around"). It's almost impossible to point out the best songs as the album is packed with "should-have-been-classics", but "Could You Be the One?" is clearly one of the best Bob Mould songs ever. However, to me The Grant Hart songs "She Floated Away" (which is a folk-song packed in a jazz-arrrangement) and the vastly underrated "Tell You Why Tomorrow" deserves special attention. A must-have album for all who's into solid rock music.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Classic Album, Classic Band, 11 May 2000
By 
A. K. Sheikh - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Warehouse Songs and Stories (Audio CD)
This, the final album by Minneapolis' finest band, came out in 1987 at peaked at 75 in the UK chart. Bob Mould went on to bigger, if not better, things with Sugar and a successful solo career, Grant Hart spiralled into nothingness and Greg Norton became a chef in St. Paul's. Here, though, we can remember what a great band those three men were.
Opening with Mould's "These Important Years", it's clear that his songwriting and singing is much better than on previous recordings. The message is obvious: appreciate the moment before it's over. A fitting message for what would follow for the band and its members.
The production, like on previous Husker Du outings, is very toppy, the drums sounding especially flimsy here. But the songs, especially from Mould, are so good that the production takes little away.
Hart's first song on the album, "...Hope" tells the tale of a couple making it and losing it all again. Strangely, this could document his life too... Hart's contributions to this album indicate that his best days were coming to a close. Whereas Mould became a better writer over the years, Hart started extremely strongly and faded towards the end.
"Standing in the Rain", another personal song, is about being let down and has some great vocal harmonies in the fade-out. If you've been there, you'll know what Mould is going on about.
Following this is probably Hart's best song on this album, "Back from Somewhere". It's a great rollercoaster of a song that is fast, slow, high-pitched and low-key, all with a tremendous energy. "Ice Cold Ice" really showcases how well Mould's and Hart's voices went together. It's also a highlight of the album. The lyrics are also really strong. The ending is also a bit of a surprise!
"You're a Soldier" and "Too Much Spice" see Hart tackling gung-ho military machismo and eighties materialism respectively. However good these attempts may be, compared to Mould's "Could You Be The One?" which separates them, you feel that they're just not up to Husker Du's usual standard.
"Friend..." is another Husker Du classic. It sounds like the Yardbirds on speed! The lyrics are really truthful and honest and the melody is another very hummable power-pop tune. "Visionary" is a thrash-pop song, again with a great vocal performance. "She Floated Away" is a jazzy kind of punk song (if you can imagine such a thing!) that is another album highlight especially with the glockenspiel and pan-pipe sounds, and Hart's last good song on it.
The angst-ridden "Bed of Nails" is a reminder of earlier songs like "59 Times the Pain" or "Hardly Getting Over It". "...Tomorrow" offers some light relief in the lyric and the clock noises at the end. "It's Not Peculiar" seems to be about the pressures of a relationship and, again, you'll find yourself sympathising with Mould. Hart again comes up with a funny song about the human condition that hits the nail on the head in "Actual Condition", where he turns the band into a rock'n'roll outfit, complete with slap-back echo. "No Reservations"and "Turn It Around", both great songs, see Mould coming out as the "serious" songwriter, compared to Hart's more light-hearted tracks, such as "She's a Woman (And Now He is a Man)". Unfortunately, the album ends with its two weakest tracks "Up in the Air" and "You Can Live At Home", the former talking about trying hard and never quite getting there and the latter about the bitter end of a relationship. Both songs also seem to indicate a movement onto better things.
Taken as a whole, it's a fitting end to a great band. How many bands can boast a track record of explosive singles and seven albums in five years, two of those doubles? With the benefit of hindsight, the honesty in the songwriting shows that, maybe Mould and Hart knew it was going to be "Game Over" soon. A classic album from a classic band.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of my all-time favourites!!!, 2 Dec 2011
This review is from: Warehouse Songs and Stories (Audio CD)
I remember buying this great album on double vinyl from my local record shop in Aberystwyth, West Wales (Andy's Records,if you're interested-he's still trading!), just because the sleeve caught my eye. Never heard of the band, thought I'd take a chance. I'm so glad I did! What an album-absolutely fantastic!! I love the loud, pre-grunge sound. The massive guitars. The tunes are great too, but above all it's the quality of the lyrics that have always stood out for me. Particularly Bob Mould's songs. Great stuff. The mid to late 80s was an exciting time in American rock, particularly the so-called 'college rock' scene. The Pixies and IRS-era REM helped to change my musical taste forever, but this great album keeps coming back to me. My daughters are a bit young to (hopefully) appreciate it, so at the moment I only get to blast it out when I'm alone in the car! It helps the long journeys fly by!! I'd give it TEN stars if I could, alas, FIVE will have to do. Buy it and enjoy it!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Flawed but still great, 12 July 2011
By 
Russell Finch (Crowthorne, Berkshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Warehouse Songs and Stories (Audio CD)
Husker Du's last album gets a variable reception in most quarters, but for me it's a typical double album in that it's a fantastic single album which didn't get pruned enough. On nearly all the previous Husker albums, I preferred the stronger melodies of Grant Hart's songs, but Bob Mould really came to the fore here. Personally I'd have removed 6 tracks here (2,5,6,8,15 and 17) and 4 of these are Hart's. What's left is absolutely spectacular though, and is as good as any other album they made. However it's a terrible sounding record - words like thin and tinny just don't do it justice - on most of the tracks you can barely hear Greg Norton's bass at all. Like all the Husker Du back catalogue, it desperately needs remastering but I can't see this happening any time soon so don't let this stop you!
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Husker's swansongs, 8 Aug 2010
This review is from: Warehouse Songs and Stories (Audio CD)
'Warehouse' was to be the Husker's last album and listening to it today It's hard to believe that the band were writing songs like 'Bricklayer' just six years earlier. This album has a polished sound with an (almost) radio friendly production that confirms the bands development from hardcore punkers to pioneering indie rockers - a sound which would be labeled 'grunge' years later. New listeners should be aware that this isn't the Husker's best album and some of the songs are in my opinion pretty ordinary. Despite a few classic tunes ('Up In The Air', 'No Reservations', 'She Floated Away' etc) the album is unnecessarily overlong and unfortunately none of the 20 tracks have the experimental sound or focus which made their other double album (1984's 'Zen Arcade') such a triumph. Few would deny that this is an improvement on the dour Warner's debut 'Candy Apple Grey', but the spark and energy of the SST records is mostly missing. When you think that both Bob Mould and Grant Hart would release superb post Husker solo records in 'Workbook' and 'Intolerance' it's hard to shake off the feeling that this album is more of an exercise in purging material before splitting up rather than a concerted band effort. Overall 'Warehouse' is a fairly patchy end for a band who left a remarkable legacy, but a few great songs still make this album a worthwhile listen.
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4.0 out of 5 stars HUSKER DU 2ND BEST ALBUM, 13 Mar 2010
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This review is from: Warehouse Songs and Stories (Audio CD)
I own all their albums and this has got to be their 2nd best after Candy Apple Grey. There has been alot of talk about selling out and going commercial, but I prefur their older work and the older I get the harder it is to listen to such work as Zen Arcade, New Day Rising, Flip your Wig and as for Land Speed Record I was never a fan of that one. These 4 albums are not some thing you could just put on and sit down and and have a relaxed time, or have as back ground music while you do some thing else, but their later two albums Candy and this one you can. This album has 20 songs on it and when I brought it in the mid 80s it was a double album on Vinyl. There are a few weak tracks but on the whole is very good, and thats why I now brought it again on CD.
There are some stunning tracks on this disc like Ice Cold Ice, She Floated Away, Visionary, and one of my favourites You Can Live At Home. Which there is a hint of the power you will find in their earlier work. So to all thoughs young people out there who might be interested in their earlier work get, I would buy Candy 1st then Warehouse and then work backwards buying Flip Your Wig first and if you like that one then get their even earlier work.
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