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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Death metal album ever, 5 May 2005
By 
Jane Aland (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Symphonies of Sickness probably ranks as the ultimate grindcore record - truly sick and twisted vocals and muddy guitar riffs buried under an avalanche of hyper-speed blastbeat drums and, perhaps wisely, Carcass didn't even attempt to match it. In an identical career move to guitarist Bill Steer's old band Napalm Death, having produced two albums worth of sense-pummelling grindcore Carcass take their foot off the acceleration pedal, slow down a bit, and try their hand at death metal. Amazingly it works, and having already produced the best ever grindcore album with Symphonies of Sickness Carcass manage to follow it with the best death metal album ever recorded (and still yet to be topped a decade later).
The killer guitar riffs that were buried beneath the noise on Symphonies are still present, but with a fantastic production and less emphasis on speed the metal riffs stand out more. The addition of ex-Carnage guitarist Michael Amott also gives the band a new feel, with plenty of duelling guitar solos. On paper Necroticism - Descanting the Insalubrious (lit: Harmonising with the Unhealthy) should be a sell-out compared to the bands earlier work, and though it's undeniably a slightly easier prospect (not least for the lack of real life autopsy front cover collage), the actual songs on Necroticism are the most complex Carcass would ever write. With half the tracks running over the 6-minute mark these are epic journeys through colliding death metal riffs, with the double attack vocals of Bill Steer and Jeff Walker providing a great contrast and adding a real richness of variety to the album (something that would be sorely missed on follow-up album Heartwork). The lyrics are also amazing - while still dedicated to the destruction of the human form Jeff Walker picks out some real crazed ideas - with songs variously about corpses being used as fertiliser, jigsaws, pet-food, musical instruments and even as glue in 'Incarnated Solvent Abuse', a song that manages to combine the insanity of getting high on the dead with possibly the best metal riff ever invented.
Musically Necroticism shows Carcass at their height, carving out a path that hundreds of bands would follow, but none (including Carcass themselves) would ever equal in the future. If you only ever buy one Carcass album - heck, if you only ever buy one death metal album - make it this one.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic metal album., 24 Dec. 2000
By A Customer
You'll notice that whenever a metal fan compiles a list of their favourite albums,Necrotism nearly always pops up.The reason being that it is one of the classics of the death metal genre.
On this album,Bill Steer and Mike Ammott's guitar work truly shines and their guitar sound is unmistakable but always fresh.Jeff Walker's screams and growls send shivers down spines and the drum work is executed perfectly.
It's a harsh album to a listener.It's not the type of music that anyone can listen to.Aurally rough and thematically disgusting to some (deals with death/murder.That type of thing) but maybe that's what makes it such a treasure.Who knows?Put simply,there isn't a bad track on here.It just shines and is a wonderful example to us all that British metal can truly produce classics.Brutal and raw,this is not one for the faint of heart.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential, 18 Dec. 2003
At the interface of grindcore and death metal, 'Necrotism' remains a state-of-the-art work, and has few peers. Mixing melody with bone-crushing heaviness, Steer, Amott and Walker weave a tapestry of sonic destruction. If, as an interview somewhere on the web would have it, drummer Ken Ownens really *did* pick out some of these mesmerising riffs on a battered acoustic guitar, then he is some kind of genius of fretboard geometry. Both riff-laden and devastatingly brutal in turns, this is the pinnacle of Carcass's achievement. Their opening brace of grindcore albums may be landmarks, if not genre-defining, but this, their third album, is probably their most satisfying. The 'Lavaging' riff will beat your ears to death; 'Inpropogation' is breathtakingly deft, and heart-stoppingly heavy. A triumph -- buy without hesitation.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An album every death metal fan must own, 11 April 2002
By A Customer
I can't speak highly enough of this album. It's incredibly heavy, and Colin Richardson's (Burn My Eyes, Demanufacture) production is razor sharp (similar to Heartwork). The godawful production that made Carcass' first two albums (reekofputrefaction and Symphonies of Sickness) such classics(!) has disappeared but the morbid, eloquent lyrics are still intact. It may be 11 years old but it still beats the hell out of most death metal stuff being churned out today. This is actually better than their most well known album, Heartwork, even though the riffs take a little while longer to bury themselves in your head. Messrs Steer, Amott (now with melodic metallers Arch Enemy) and Walker are geniuses. Walker's pathological jargon is truly engrossing, and the morgue hall soundclips to each song give this album real character. The subject matter is quite gory and sick, be warned, but if that doesn't bother you then purchase this, it really is a classic.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Goregrind splatter to Death Metal platter..., 5 Nov. 2007
By 
Carcass proved that the glimmers of genius they presented to us on their first two fuzz packed records, was ready to burst out into what they had always subconciously wanted to play. Grind tinged death metal with real melody, but shredding riffs and concrete drum barages !!!
Adding the ever young looking Michael Amott to their ranks, they gained a real thinker in melodic guitar metal, but took nothing from their famous aggressive streak.
The opener 'Inpropagation', starts with a recorded mortuary sample, and then cuts into one of the best riffs Carcass have ever written.
Lyrically they are still messing about with medical and pathological text books, and it doesn't really matter whats being said, as its all pretty much redundant any way.
Steer's backing biled growl is sparce but a perfect echo to Jeff Walker's loud bellow.
Its no coincidence that Amott (who gets younger every year to look at) co-wrote the most memorable tracks on the album. 'Incarnated Solvent Abuse' was the first single/ video off the album, and its just quality Carcass.
'Corporal Jigsore Quandry' has possibly the best riff released on any album in 1991, certainly the best on any Carcass album. The opening 30 seconds is enough to tear buildings down with just by playing it loud enough !!!
Carcass went on after this to "change" their style, and become much more melodic, which, if you read any of the interviews they did as kids, listen to any of their former bands or generally take a guess, they either got old or bored. Shame. This was just starting to look good.
Amott went off to do Arch Enemy. And he's done a pretty good job of it so far.
The little samples, linking the tracks with their blackened humour, the totally gut wrenching riffs of tracks like 'Pedigree Butchery', mad names such as 'Lavaging Expectorate of Lysergide Composition' and the last, morbid shreds of repeaded riffs finishing off the final track, all come together to make a thoroughly one off album.
Many have copied, none have ever quite equalled.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars essential, 23 Sept. 2001
By A Customer
i'd heard a lot about this album and friends recommended that i listen to it as i was into slayer and liked bands like death. it only took one listen to the opening track, inpropagation, and i was instantly hooked. i'd never heard a more disciplined approach to playing this kind of music. then after i had got over the amazing music, i paid more attention to the lyrics. jeff walker is very intelligent but it was the dark sense of humour that attracted me to his writing. absolutely essential for any metal fan. buy it today.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A great album., 12 Jan. 2015
By 
D. Thompson (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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I have just discovered Carcass, despite being in to metal etc for 28 years. Well what a gem of a band I have missed out on, on all these years. This is their masterpiece as far as I am concerned. Songs are ore structured than any previous offerings, and by slowing down slightly and not sacrificing heaviness they have found the right formula.
A great album.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Genre defining stuff, 13 April 2013
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The last article I read about Jeff Walker he was expressing some disquiet about Carcass leading and others following and getting the credit/money and you can see what he meant.
Good stuff from one of the original sources.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Carcass at their finest, 5 Sept. 2013
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Hard to beieve this album is over 20 years old. Was one of my favourite albums of the time and remains one of my favourites to this date.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why Carcass outranked the masses....., 19 Jan. 2001
By A Customer
The stepping stone between the absolute extremities of the two previous albums and the polished perfection that is Heartwork. Necrotism, nonetheless, is a fine as example of the grindcore bag that you could wish for. Interspersed with vocal tidbits of pathology notes and autopsy anecdotes the songs come fast and furious. Walkers rasping vocals are admirably accompanied by Steers gut churning bellow, meanwhile guitars and drums run amok producing a heaviness and a ferocity that hard to find elsewhere. This brutal beast of an album is not everyone's cup o' tea thats for sure but for anyone with the slightest interest in this genre it would be classed as an all time classic.
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Necroticism / Descanting the Inasalubrious
Necroticism / Descanting the Inasalubrious by Carcass (Audio CD - 1995)
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