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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Laugh with the gentle humour and cry with the poignant songs
Another of Max Boyce's irreverent albums. Contains his gentle Welsh rugby humour, observations on life in Wales, some funny and some touching,and also reminders of the hard life of the miners and how the industry has left such a deep impression on the Welsh.
Published on 9 April 2000

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing!
I thought this would bring back happy memories of when I went to see Max Boyce live but it wasn't half as funny and also the songs were not the same. Wish he had done one live of the show called "Me and Billy Williams".
Published on 23 Nov. 2012 by Mrs Elizabeth A Pote


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Laugh with the gentle humour and cry with the poignant songs, 9 April 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Live At Treorchy (Audio CD)
Another of Max Boyce's irreverent albums. Contains his gentle Welsh rugby humour, observations on life in Wales, some funny and some touching,and also reminders of the hard life of the miners and how the industry has left such a deep impression on the Welsh.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is Hiraeth, 10 Sept. 2006
By 
Mr. Ford John Brazel "fordyboy" (Barry, Wales) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Live At Treorchy (Audio CD)
This CD made for spectacular listening, i was in Treorchy on the night this was recorded and listening to it again all these years later bought back some memories. This is welsh humour at it's best and would probably be lost on anyone else, but for the pure parody of the songs it's really worth a listen.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A real sence of nationality, 24 Nov. 2000
This review is from: Live At Treorchy (Audio CD)
This album really sums up the Welsh personality and gives a sence of belonging to the listner. It is a mixture of rugby based humour and heart stirring welsh songs with a traditional emphasis projected. It is a cracking album and is a reflection of a friendly, welcoming rugby mad nation that love their music and a humerous craic. A very valued neccesity for any true Welsh rugby fan. Dai Iaun
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best album's by this Great Welsh Ambassodor, 10 Nov. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Live At Treorchy (Audio CD)
You heared him in the world cup,
hear the original "hymns and arias"
and my personal the "ballad of morgan the moon"
An excelent piece of Welsh Culture, u know u want to buy it, chwarae teg. Keep up the good work MAX!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Time it was reissued with the original sleeve design, but still excellent, 9 Feb. 2014
By 
Stephen E. Andrews "Writer" (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Live At Treorchy (Audio CD)
I purchased this CD for my Dad some years ago as he'd owned the vinyl album back in the early 70s when it was first issued. Listening to it one day when at home, I found I enjoyed the album enormously - I knew it would be good to hear it again (I'm one of those people who is unafraid of nostalgia, I think it's a healthy emotion rather than a self-denying one), but I was surprised by how much impact the recording had upon me.

Let me be direct: I am NOT a typical Welshman...or perhaps I should say, I don't fit the clichéd idea of what a Welshman is. I can't stand rugby, hate bad beer, am not very interested in choral singing and so on. I am, however, the grandson of two miners, I was born left wing and I used to be able to sing pretty well. When I was growing up, I found the traditional idea of Welsh identity and culture ever more stultifying the older I got - I despised the way that rugby was more important in my school than academic achievement or artistic ability and being of a creative bent, I rebelled against the clichés of Welshness. Rugby in particular is like a religion in Wales and to be disinterested in it is almost a sin - and I still find this attitude amongst my countrymen irritating in the extreme. I also hated the small-mindedness of many people in Wales regarding culture - you could be the greatest artists in the world, but unless you tackled subjects that fit the bill of 'Welshness', you'd get little or no attention. For example, the greatest living Welshman to me is John Cale (founder member of the Velvet Underground) but instead of being a household name in Wales, most Cymric people have never heard of him.

With this in mind, you'd think Max Boyce would not appeal to me. Dismissed by a friend of mine as a 'professional Welshman' (and I understand what he means), I didn't think I'd enjoy hearing 'Live in Treorchy' again that much.
However, I soon found an excuse to 'borrow' it from my father's CD collection and add it to my own...

Despite my feelings of anathema toward rugby, I enjoyed what was originally side one of the vinyl album. Boyce is a true 'folk artist', reflecting as he did then the pleasures, aspirations and attitudes of the people of his milieu. he creates a feeling of involvement, closeness and warmth, which is too easily interpreted as tribalism or hegemony. It's worth remembering that this album was recorded live at a rugby club near the top of the Rhondda valley, definitive mining country, during a period of great ups and downs for miners. Not suffering the privation of their forefathers, but still seeing their fathers and grandfathers dying slowly of respiratory diseases caused by their labours, Boyce's key audience respond to him with affection. A former miner himself, Boyce understands the love of the common Welshman for his Saturday recreation and deftly translates it into witty song. Boyce is a consummate craftsman here and to understand the pride many Welsh people felt during the glory days of Cymric rugby (which were starting to draw to a close when this album was recorded), you can do no better than listen to these songs.

What affected me even more were the more poetic, tragic folksongs that make up much of side two: numbers about the decline of the mines and the effects of pit closures on communities, the tragedy of the hardness of life as a miner, the gentle black melancholy of the Welsh soul - all rendered sensitively, Romantically (note the large R) and eloquently. It is this darker material that I recalled less, being not so interested in it as a boy as I was in the jokes and the rugby songs. Now, it is clear to me that these more serious songs are Boyce's finest work - and a very neglected part of his oeuvre. It is by these works we should judge him. he may not be as well-versed in shades of irony and bible blackness as either Dylan Thomas or Gwynn Thomas, but his common touch makes his accessibility vitally important as a Welsh icon.

I know this all seems very dour and serious, but the authentic, close atmosphere of this recording -easily one of my favourite live albums (and that's saying something) - will make you smile. But the more reflective material should not be underrated, as it is not just historically important, but does say something about the Cymric soul.

Obviously, this review is subjective. Being Welsh, I cannot judge or imagine how Boyce could be viewed by a thoughtful and perceptive non-Cymric audience and I could understand it if they just felt his work was silly and sentimental Taffy nonsense. Having lived in England for a long time, still finding my homeland small-minded and lacking in aspiration and imagination at times, but loving the warmth and unpretentiousness of many of the people and always in admiration of the harsh, doomy countryside of the nation, I'll admit some objectivity - but not much. My father was born in Cwmparc and I visited Treorchy numerous times as a child and still have relatives there, so naturally I'm biased, even against my will.

As an authentic document of South wales culture, this album is essential, every bit as important as the works of writers like Alun Richards and Gwyn Thomas, though not as profound. I urge all Welsh people to also look beyond the obvious at Welsh rock artists like Cale and the psychedelic band Man, both of whom were almost ignored by traditional audiences in their times (unlike Manic Street Preachers, who broke through to popular Welsh acclaim). But I wish this album would be reissued with the original cover design, which is far better and more iconic than this shoddily packaged and presented CD. The recording itself, however, remains seminal and the best thing Boyce ever did.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant for any rugby fan, 15 May 2010
By 
S. WATKINS (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Live At Treorchy (Audio CD)
Still fantastic
a real laugh for any fan of rugby
but a brilliant laugh for any Welsh Fan

beats any modern humour
ie not funny pc stuff

enjoy again and again
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Timeless classic, 12 Mar. 2010
By 
This review is from: Live At Treorchy (Audio CD)
...and I'm not Welsh. It does help though if you are familiar with the Wales of the 1970/80's
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4.0 out of 5 stars A great beginning., 14 Aug. 2011
This review is from: Live At Treorchy (Audio CD)
After eclipsing Ken Dodd in a Swansea theatre Max had to engineer this album himself. The songs range from the hilarious "Scottish Trip", "Morgan the Moon" and others to the sobering mining ballards "Duw it's Hard" and "Do they understand." To make sure that he had an audience to sing to Max gave away many tickets just to fill the Treorchy RFC Clubhouse and was wise enought to make sure that the Treorchy Male Voice Choir got a good share which accounts for the quality and volume of the sing-along numbers. If you ever wondered about Max Boyce this will give you your answer.
Max went on to record his second album "We all had doctor's papers" which is the only comedy album to reach No.1 in the album charts; another good belly laugh with the sad, though provoking "Rhondda Grey.WE ALL HAD DOCTOR'S PAPERS LP UK EMI 1975"
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Funny!, 27 Jan. 2014
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This review is from: Live At Treorchy (Audio CD)
Max Boyce is an exceptional comedian/singer and, quite probably, my favourite. He is not seen much on TV these days so his CD and other recordings are much soughtb after.

Buy and enjoy!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Max Boyce - Live at Treorchy, 2 April 2011
This review is from: Live At Treorchy (Audio CD)
A great trip down memory lane for anyone who grew up listening to Max Boyce. All the favourites are jam packed into this nostaligic album including 9-3, The Scottish Trip and The Outside Half Factory. A delight for any Welsh rugby fan. I bought 3 copies; one for my Dad (Father's Day) my brother (birthday) and myself (why not!) Excellent value for money. Buy it now!
PS And don't worry about the cover not being the same as the original Live at Treorchy vinyl album (with Max on the front in a dodgy mac clutching a giant leek) It's a genuine recording.Enjoy.Live at Treorchy
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