Customer Reviews

16
4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
5
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
The Deram Anthology: 1966-1968
Format: Audio CDChange
Price:£5.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on 27 July 2002
...This ain't rock'n'roll! This is...well, what exactly? This is a definitive collection of Bowie's releases for Deram in 1966 and 1967. DB was listening to the Velvet Underground, Scott Walker, and The Mothers of Invention at this time but these songs seem more influenced by music hall and big bands of the '20s and '30s, with waltz tempos aplenty and lots of oompah-ing brass arrangements! There's some twee psychedelia on "Sell Me A Coat" and "Ching A Ling", ultra-fey teen pop on "Love You Till Tuesday" and some semi-autobiographical cynical vignettes of Swinging London "Join The Gang", "Maid Of Bond Street" and "London Boys".
For the most part, however, it's like Listen With Mother hosted by Edgar Allen Poe. Beneath the rinky-dink arrangements are songs about a lonely bombardier who befriends two children and is run out of town as a suspected paedophile; a woman who drags up as a man to join the army; and a future in which the government has enforced mass abortion, suicide and sterilisation to stop the population explosion!
There's also some poignant songs that yearn for an idyllic childhood that never was - "Come And Buy My Toys" and the brilliant "There Is A Happy Land" (a forerunner of "After All" on MAN WHO SOLD THE WORLD).
Bowie's continual interest in Buddhism ("Quicksand", "Seven Years In Tibet") makes its first appearance here with "Silly Boy Blue".
The stand out song is "Please Mr Gravedigger",a spoken word monologue about a gravedigger who is digging a grave for the child-murderer he is contemplating killing! The only backing is a FX tape of a storm, DB stomping on a tray full of gravel, and a very convincing 'fake sneeze' ("Scuse me"). Outstanding, wierd and his first 'acting' role.
You can have fun spotting ideas and themes that Bowie has recycled on later occasions. Never one to waste an idea, the bass riff in the middle of "Join The Gang" (itself ripped off from "Gimme Some Lovin'") reappeared on "Strangers When We Meet", thirty years later; and "Ching A Ling"s melody was reworked as the synthesiser part on "Saviour Machine" from THE MAN WHO SOLD THE WORLD.
Oh, and "The Laughing Gnome" is on there too. The Bowie song no one will admit to liking, but we all secretly know all the words!
This album will make you wonder where David would be know if he had never discovered The Velvet Underground, Neitzsche and the influences that shaped his 1970s work. One thing's for sure, I'd rather listen to this CD than "Tonight" any day!
44 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
As a youngster first getting in to Bowie, I was so knocked out by Ziggy Stardust that I had to add to my collection...and ended up with the Laughing Gnome...! So, if you're new to David's work, this is all Sixties pre-fame recordings. They are however exceptionally charming, a little whimsical and as the press said at the time, more Tony Newley than Tony Newley! Rather lovely but not representative of later works!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 23 June 2015
I am not a David Bowie Fan but I liked his earlier music the laughing Gnome and Uncle Arthur, in the later years David Bowies music became more serious. But he had to move with the times, I liked some of his later music like Boys keep swinging and Dancing in the Streets which are not on this album, David was one of the first singers to paint his face and make himself up, I am 51 and when he was doing this it was weird in my day as men only wore a ear wing in the left ear and women where not ladies if they drunk out of a pint glass in a pub, but today all this is classed as normal but David may remember himself what it was like and it would of been hard for him a coming star, but there is no doubt as the years have gone on I have learnt to respect his music and enjoy listening to some of his songs, on this album is Space oddity which started the change in his music, but this Album is his earlier stuff which I remember listening to when I was young.
.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 19 February 2010
I always knew that this stuff existed, but I hadn't expected it to contain such variety and be so interesting. The album seems to present the artist's struggle to establish style and identity (Anthony Newley, Scott Walker, The Monkees, Lou Reed..?) and make the breakthrough to sucess that eventually arrived with Space Oddity; interesting for the who artist who invented "re-inventing himself"! There are some beutifull tracks and some downright weird and creepy ones. Certain distressing themes recur in the work and it would be most interesting if Mr. Bowie would produce a frank autobiography of this period. Too much good stuff to list in detail, but "Little Bombedier" and "Let Me Sleep Beside You" are currently my personal favourites.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Well yeah, it's Bowie, and if you wanna know what he was up to before Space Oddity than this is a good way to find out. Definitely, considering it includes every track on his first album "David Bowie" and more. In it's own right the material here is very good, but it's still kind of hard to believe that this is David Bowie! Kind of like hearing The Beatles' She Loves You (yeah, yeah, yeah) after having listened to Across The Universe and other later masterpieces. But hey, it's still worth it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Recorded in 1966, this strange album displays Bowie's seeds of genius. The dark subject matter is presented in a type of music hall feel that is unconventional even now, three decades later. The wide variety of themes are often set to noteworthy tunes, whilst the inclusion of an early version of Space Oddity and the charming song The Laughing Gnome make the album a must for Bowie completists.
Tracks like Maid Of Bond Street, London Boys and Join The Gang deal with Bowie's youth in swinging London, whilst She's Got My Medals examines gender roles. The ominous We Are Hungry Men depicts a totalitarian nightmare where population control is carried out by cannibalism, amongst other things. Then there's Please Mr Gravedigger, about infanticide, and Little Bombardier, about child abuse. Bowie also explores the innocence of childhood in songs like This Is A Happy Land, Uncle Arthur and Come And Buy My Toys. Let Me Sleep Beside You and When Live My Dream are songs of yearning, quiet moving and memorable.
In a way, Bowie returned to this style of song on 1973's futuristic cabaret Aladdin Sane, albeit with more contemporary instruments and arrangements. That was also the year in which the re-released Laughing Gnome made the top ten in the UK. The music is remarkable and unusual but could find no audience in the psychedelic late sixties when rock legends were made. Those Bowie fans that have assimilated all his transformations down the years might find this an interesting collection, but it often still sounds weird. How great that Bowie persevered to make some of the most compelling music of the 1970s and 1980s. The roots of his genius are certainly evident here.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Recorded in 1966, this strange album displays Bowie's seeds of genius. The dark subject matter is presented in a type of music hall feel that is unconventional even now, three decades later. The wide variety of themes are often set to noteworthy tunes, whilst the inclusion of an early version of Space Oddity and the charming song The Laughing Gnome make the album a must for Bowie completists.
Tracks like Maid Of Bond Street, London Boys and Join The Gang deal with Bowie's youth in swinging London, whilst She's Got My Medals examines gender roles. The ominous We Are Hungry Men depicts a totalitarian nightmare where population control is carried out by cannibalism, amongst other things. Then there's Please Mr Gravedigger, about infanticide, and Little Bombardier, about child abuse. Bowie also explores the innocence of childhood in songs like This Is A Happy Land, Uncle Arthur and Come And Buy My Toys. Let Me Sleep Beside You and When Live My Dream are songs of yearning, quiet moving and memorable.
In a way, Bowie returned to this style of song on 1973's futuristic cabaret Aladdinsane, albeit with more contemporary instruments and arrangements. That was also the year in which the re-released Laughing Gnome made the top ten in the UK. The music is remarkable and unusual but could find no audience in the psychedelic late sixties when rock legends were made. Those Bowie fans who have assimilated all his transformations down the years might find this an interesting collection, but it often still sounds weird. How great that Bowie persevered to make some of the most compelling music of the 1970s and 1980s. The roots of his genius are certainly evident here.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 20 March 2014
We all know the artistic brilliant Bowie from the 70's and the ego infested Bowie of today but what about him pre-fame days? This is a collection of his material in the 60's and it is remarkably superb..some classic songs and some arty type numbers but generally this is a collection you will put on again and again...
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
This was recommended to me and a fine album of early bowie it is too.All the early mod hits are here,it is well produced and sounds great although i can remember some of the tracks on vinyl,this is simply a brilliant example of the genius of himself.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 1 November 2013
I had this on L P when I was young and thought that I,d relive my youth surprisingly enough it has stood the test of time on the whole.Not for every day listening but still love his voice.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Space Oddity
Space Oddity by David Bowie (Audio CD - 1999)

 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.