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4.5 out of 5 stars
Modern Life Is Rubbish
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 16 September 2013
Blur's second album 'Modern Life Is Rubbish' is my hands down favourite, bringing Britpop to the focus at the time, and spawning three singles: 'For Tomorrow' (not only my favourite Blur song, but in a short list of my all time favourites by any artist), 'Chemical World' and 'Sunday Sunday', none of which hit the heights of their later hits, but made a lot of people take notice of them.

I think that the cover conveys the message that this is a great album (If I was to judge a book by it's cover then that's what I would think anyway) - and indeed it is. The title is appropriate as a lot of the songs give off the message that life in the modern world is well, 'rubbish', and at the same time manages to perfectly capture the sense of living in the city, creating an almost romantic and somewhat nostalgic picture of London at the same time.

For the most part, the tracks on the album are slow-paced and relaxing ('Blue Jeans' is particularly sublime) whilst the others, including the outstanding 'For Tomorrow' and fan favourite 'Sunday Sunday' are quirky and upbeat, the perfect tunes to sing-a-long and lift your mood. The funny thing is, the whole record sounds just as fresh and modern today, which is quite an achievement for an album released in 1993.

Please do yourself a favour, this is an outstanding album, but you should seriously consider buying the 2012 two disc Modern Life Is Rubbish edition to hear these songs in such crystal clear remastered quality, and also to own the bonus disc which has 19 tracks, including all the B sides to the singles 'Popscene', 'For Tomorrow' and 'Chemical World', including a sweet cover of Rod Stewart's 'Maggie May' and 'Young and Lovely', a gem and still occasionally played live today. The packaging is also neat, housed in a lift-off lid box with four artwork postcards and a booklet with never-seen-before photos and liner notes based on an interview with all the members of the band. It really is a superb, worthy re-issue of one of my all time favourite albums.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 10 July 2015
This album is by far my favorite of all time I would say (if I had to pick something for an answer to win a flash car perhaps)

But in all truth, I think it is. For a start of the double disc version has all the b sides (that covers the whole cd) which is excellent.
The other good thing about it is, its the most varied Blur album. After this they became a bit all the same, and after 1995 all their records became experimental.

I suppose its a view on England life, but with observation and good humor and a will to change things too. Every song has something different to each one though, humor, sarcasm and eccentric-ness.

I wish Blur would try and do another album more like this in the future, their first two records may not of been their most creative but they were the most original.

This is the sort of album Oasis could do with making with a bit more variety to the music.
No other band has done an album like this, and the B Sides are just as good as the album.

It also transports you back to a time when you might want to be outside more, not use a cellphone or those dreaded I pods or pads and just breath a bit of fresh air and look forward to the future.

If Modern Life is Rubbish in 1993, its 2015 now.......well...surely things haven't got any better, I say Blur write another album like this to make it more interesting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Whilst 'Leisure', their debut, provides easy early nineties indie listening and a couple of gems in "sing" and "birthday" - here is the beginning of Blur finding their eclectic and ever-shifting unique sound. Have owned for many years, my opinion is the same now as it was then - an enjoyable album but not consistently great as their albums hereafter will prove to be, but worthy of having if you are ever looking to complete your Blur collection. "For tomorrow', 'Chemical World' and "Sunday, Sunday" are the obvious blueprint numbers for their Magnus opus released the following year, but the touching acceptance of passive blandness in a relationship is bliss of "Blue Jeans"; the jangly, low fi, subtle two fingers up to America of 'Miss America' that musically would fit nicely on their 1997 eponymous album (knowingly ironic, the response on that album is that actually America is "alright" - well it was the Clinton years), the pure pop of 'Turn it up' and the down tones and screeching background guitars of the plodding ennui of "resigned" - more reflected where Blur's true genius lay.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 24 July 2013
different to the the first shoe-gazey, art rock whirl of their debut, this album is the start of their trademark sound that we all know and love. Albarn rambles on about life in the city throughout the album and adopts a more observational style of lyrics, with characters being the themes of songs. Featuring very kinks-esque influences and catchy, sing-along choruses, even if the lyrics are just "la la la". Coxon's stabby, punchy and sometimes warm guitar riffs shine so bright on this album album that it could very well burn a hole straight through your CD player. Its Parklife's more timid sibling but is just as punchy. This album is Alex James's favourite Blur album and it could very well be yours.

9/10

Favourite songs: Advert, for tomorrow, coping, Sunday Sunday, Colin zeal
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 8 January 2010
Modern Life is Rubbish. A whole album about.... how modern life is a bit naff. Great lyrics which you just have to agree with, very good music work and a great message to be putting out to the world. Food processors are great!
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 13 December 1999
Have to agree. This is Blur's best effort, a real sing-along delight packed with tunes and melodies. I used to hate the sleeve art, but then I changed my mind.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Modern Life Is Rubbish, but that word rubbish cannot be used when describing this excellent album from the Blur boys!Every track on this album is nothing but pure quality.The songs showcase many of Blur's influences and styles we have all come to know and love, ranging from feel good quirky pop,hard edged indie and a sprinkling of sounds of the mod persuasion.Modern Life Is Rubbish,acts almost as a prelude to what Blur were to become in the proceeding years of the Park Life and Great Escape era, nevertheless this album never loses its alternative cutting edge feel.Even after an incredible eight years on fom when the album was released back in 1993, none of the songs sound dated or inferior when compared to what other guitar based bands are churning out today.One could say Damon and co have created a timeless indie classic, and I concur wholeheartedly with my fellow reviewers, Modern Life Is Rubbish goes a long way in exhibiting Blur at their brilliant best.Often overlooked by critics in favour of Parklife and some of Blur's later studio recordings, Modern Life Is Rubbish is essential listening if Blur is your poison, or if you just have the urge to listen to wonderfully crafted guitar driven indie music that has melody, passion and a bit of attitude thrown in for good measure, give this gem a spin and discover Blur's sentiments on modern life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 23 March 2009
I originally had this album on tape, but decided to also buy it on CD.

It is my favourite blur album, definitely worth buying.
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on 13 September 2013
'Modern Life Is Rubbish' suffered from '2nd album' syndrome; for some reason the public just didn't buy it and the singles released failed to hit the Top 10. However, many of the excellent tracks on this LP are firm favourites with the fans (and the band for that matter); I suggest this collection is well worth checking out.
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on 15 August 2014
Bought as gift, recipient very pleased !
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