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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Genius!!!!!
I really cant speak highly enough of this album. It's a masterpiece!!
When everyone thought Macca was washed up back in the 80's and early 90's he then came out with this beauty in 97' and blew all the critics away. If only Jeff Lynn(Producer) had worked on some of those earlier albums!!
McCartney at the top of his game!!!
Published on 13 Sept. 2011 by C. Tomlinson

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Bought as a christmas present. Informed by receiver that ...
Bought as a christmas present. Informed by receiver that it sound was jumpy when played (this was played on a "hi spec" Hi Fi. When he played it in the car cd player it did the same thing. Very disappointing as it was a present.
Published 4 days ago by Angie Rees


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Genius!!!!!, 13 Sept. 2011
By 
C. Tomlinson - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Flaming Pie (Audio CD)
I really cant speak highly enough of this album. It's a masterpiece!!
When everyone thought Macca was washed up back in the 80's and early 90's he then came out with this beauty in 97' and blew all the critics away. If only Jeff Lynn(Producer) had worked on some of those earlier albums!!
McCartney at the top of his game!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Back To Basics, 12 Nov. 2013
By 
John Heaton - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Flaming Pie (Audio CD)
Coming after the Beatles' Anthology project, Paul produces some sublime music. If not as always uniformally. Here goes:
The Songs We Were Singing Nice wistful opener, but lacking a little variety (eg a middle eight) to make it truly memorable. 7/10
The World Tonight the second single and it has it moments. But as a song it's not too special 7/10
If You Wanna Pleasant but nothing special 6.5/10
Somedays McCartney classic,sublime 10/10
Young Boy Good first single,I really like this. Nice guitar solo. But the ending goes on too long (a bit like Back Seat Of My Car) 8.5/10
Calico Skies Very nice ballad, especially the melody 8.5/10
Flaming Pie Amusing lyric and good sound,if not much as an actual song 7/10
Heaven On A Sunday Nice but too derivative to be a classic 7/10
Used To Be Bad Pretty bad 5/10
Souvenir Lost little gem right here, nice production from J Lynne 8/10
Little Willow Classic, especially the middle section when the piano comes in 9.5/10
Really Love You featured Ringo but should have NOT have been released 3/10
Beautiful Night I love it,and Ringo's singing on the last chorus is a delight 9/10 :-)
Great Day Reflective closer 6.5/10

The best moments here lift this album above most of Paul's output post Wings for me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Macca, can I play on your next album? I am better on mandolin than you!, 8 May 2014
By 
Sid Griffin (London, England) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Flaming Pie (Audio CD)
I have stayed away from latter day McCartney solo stuff as I figured he must be out of gas by now. But with Dylan recently singing Sir Paul's praises I took a chance on this one.

Recorded after The Beatles' Anthology series was completed McCartney for once set the bar as high as the old days and kept it there. Yes, a fair bit of it does sound like something from him before but I still loved Little Willow (allegedly written for the family of the late Maureen Cox) and all the songs about his late wife Linda inspiring him. Ah, call me a softy, okay? And if you like the Beatles check out the final ballad here, Beautiful Night.

One problem is there is so much Beatle-ness going on you find yourself half expecting the next song to have a George or John vocal. Yes, Ringo and Sir George Martin are here at times but the one chord improvised Ringo jam is filler and the Steve Miller blues piece seems a bit filler too. A case of three fewer songs on this album and you would have had a stronger artistic statement but we seem to feel albums lasting at least 45 minutes are the law now and so be it. But lose three songs and I feel this would be right behind Band On The Run or Tug Of War as a Macca Classic.

I still play better mandolin than him. I do, its true!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars McCartney's best solo album., 18 Jun. 2007
This review is from: Flaming Pie (Audio CD)
The release of "memory almost gone" made me revisit my other McCartney albums, one of which is this total gem. Flaming Pie was written during Linda's (then private) tragic battle with cancer, and it's an album about all the things that are good in life: love, hope, reconciliation, friends and, indeed, partying.

that McCartney made such an intimate album as this, is quite amazing. his songs have never been more honest, and never more pointnant. this is an album which gently moves from one mood to the next, dealing with his wife's struggle with cancer not in a pessimistic way, but by making the most of every possible moment. there are some obvious tracks which are classic latter-day McCartney - the 60's rocker "Young Boy" and the almost-Lennon homage "Flaming Pie" with the near-nonsense-yet-strangely-meaningful lyrics and the classic McCartney piano-bashing. but it's the songs that are indirectly (or directly) about his family which are the most memorable. "Little Willow", "Heaven on A Sunday" and "Calico Skies" are tender, calm intimate portraits which are quite moving.

It feels like a family effort, indeed Linda provides some backing-vocals on one of the tracks, and McCartney's son, James provides some rather good guitar on a couple of them. Other guests invited round are steve miller and jeff lynne, but most special of all, to complete the old-boys reunion, ringo and george martin pop round for a bit of back-beat drumming and some fantastic orchestral arrangements. McCartney himself plays a lot of the instruments too - couple of tracks feature him playing nearly everything - there's a great sense of fun and 'just try it' attitude as if he felt the songs would work whatever. and they really do. He clearly enjoyed himself making this, despite the obvious adversity at home. A testament to his optimism and character if ever there was one.

you get a lot of 'up-close-and-personal' moments with just McCartney and his acoustic guitar - which are really rather effective. "Great Day" is a short little footnote after the superb "Beautiful Night" - a wind down to the latter's bombast and mayhem, and ends the album on a thoroughly optimistic tone. Can't resist a word on "Beautiful Night": It's one of those great tracks that starts off well and just improves. A really strong piano part leads into a gorgeous ballad which soars away and then back down to earth, and then - slam! - into a classic McCartney rock-out with a superb George Martin horn and string arrangement and some great guitar and general mayhem for good measure.

when I first bought this album 10yrs ago, "Beautiful Night" rapidly became one of my favourite songs. 10yrs on, nothing's changed - only now this album has become one of my all time favourites. Truly, an album that grows, and has lasted the test of time.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just a man doing a job-to make music for the fans, 17 Nov. 2006
This review is from: Flaming Pie (Audio CD)
Right from Day 1 the critics in one form or another sit behind their desks and push their pens.The World awaits for the judgment from these one time-rock-wannabbes-who-failed and its as if this is the County Court.

McCartney is on trial for a possible failure to communicate and as evidence here's the sales figures from his last album.Members of the Jury make your deliberations.....

The jury returns and the verdict is announced.Rubbish

Yes we've heard it so many times.When it happenned with RAM the result was a chart topper.

So its sales figures which say whether an album is good,bad or indifferent? Nothing to do with a composer who plucks notes out of the air,turns them into songs not even like any of his others and is able to convince millions he did the right thing?

I don't think I'd like to be a rock critic as I'm biased for one thing.I don't think I could say anything about Radiohead-why are their albums selling more than McCartneys-they are boring.

You've got to realise that McCartney has fingers in many (flaming) pies.His ambient and classical output for instance-something which began as far back as the mid 60s and "The Family Way".

This is an album which brings together many names from Beatles days.Its there for anybody who wants it.Sometimes albums don't need to sell in millions to prove their greatness-McCartney's already done that both collectively and individually.

And its also worth bearing in mind McCartney's penchant for reconstructing the Beatles songs or even his own later ones.Here's where Mccartney makes some of the best Beatles Cover Versions-after all he's the custodian of the legacy-the Keeper of the Flame.

As the Stones struggle to recapture former glories McCartney does it effortlessly with every album

With every new album you know he'll keep on trying something new,influenced by everything around him-even his son growing up
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good thing he did that Anthology project, cause this album is the beginning of Paul's best string of solo albums., Nov 1 2007, 9 Oct. 2012
The beginning of McCartney's later day career renaissance

Bob Dylan in a recent interview has said there's really only one person in music today that to him is absolutely stunning. That person, naturally, is Paul McCartney. ""I'm in awe of McCartney. He's about the only one that I am in awe of. He can do it all. And he's never let up... He's just so damn effortless." (Taken from a Rolling Stone interview from summer 2007).

High praise from someone so iconic as Bob Dylan. The last ten years for both McCartney and Dylan have proven them to be the most interesting artists of their generation currently recording. Over the last decade, both Dylan and McCartney have had a massive resurgence in their careers. While each are following their own idiosyncractic paths, both have proven themselves to have remarkable fertile songwriting during this stage in their careers.

And here's the trick. Both are the best at what they do. Sure, you can't imagine Paul McCartney being able to pull of the effortless aural history lessons in songs Dylan has been doing, each steeped in the American tradition and that "Old, Weird, America" of the Anthology of American Folk Music. Come on, could Paul really write "Nettie Moore", "Ain't Talkin'", "Mississippi", "Things Have Changed," "Tell Ol' Bill", or the masterpiece "Cross the Green Mountain"? But then again, you can't see Dylan writing the effortless melodic pop masterpieces McCartney written in FLAMING PIE, DRIVING RAIN, CHAOS & CREATION IN THE BACKYARD (one of my favorite albums of the 2000s), or MEMORY ALMOST FULL.

When FLAMING PIE hit the stores in 1997, four years separate it from McCartney's previous studio offering, OFF THE GROUND. A lot happened during those four years, namely, The Beatles multi-media project THE ANTHOLOGY. The ANTHOLOGY was a massive undertaking, resulting in three double albums of outtakes, a massive coffee-table book that really is one of the definitive resources for us Beatles nuts, and then the hours long documentary as well. Anything like that may get you thinking McCartney would really be in a reflective mood about mortality and unusually somber. Well, not really (the somber, reflective McCartney would come out in his 2005 masterpiece CHAOS).

Instead, according to the liner notes, the Anthology project would be a refresher course on how to construct a well-made song. And FLAMING PIE is full of such songs. According to Wikipedia, "McCartney sporadically recorded the entire album in a space of two years, working not only with Lynne, but with Steve Miller, George Martin, Ringo Starr and his own son, James McCartney, who plays lead guitar on "Heaven on a Sunday". "Calico Skies" and "Great Day" both hailed from a 1992 session, recorded even before Off the Ground had come out." McCartney recorded the album in the space of two years.

The album is really a return to the basic sensibilities that produced records like MCCARTNEY. The music, while carefully considered, doesn't get bogged down in rather pretentious production styles. It's carefully produced, but the music has much more of a live feel to it. While there are a couple of sore spots (the collobaration with Steve Miller always strikes me as generic 1970s rock), this is an album I find myself returning to again and again. It's that good. "Flaming Pie", the song, is just a basic rock and roll song, and while it's drawn from the Lennon story about the man on the flaming pie telling him in a dream they shall be The Beatles with an A, the song's one of the poorer ones on the record. But the rest is great, whether it's the Beatles send up "Song We Were Singing" (one of Paul's best, and just makes you smile), his refletive ballads, or just gorgeous orchestration. McCartney has always been amazing with melodies, and this record has it in spades.

Buy it. The last ten years have made both Bob Dylan and Paul McCartney extraordinarily more relevant than you could hope for if you followed their careers in the 1980s (especially Dylan). And don't worry. McCartney only gets better from this starting point in his discography. Make sure you pick up his other studio albums post dating this - there just as good, and in some cases (CHAOS), better.

McCartney has proven himself to be truly remarkable, and he has released some of his strongest music of his solo career in 1997-2007. He has proven himself remarkably consistent in the following releases. This is the starting point for his new critical revival, but thank God and thank love this isn't the ending point.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Macca Masterpiece, 17 Jan. 2012
By 
Jl Adcock "John Adcock" (Ashtead UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Flaming Pie (Audio CD)
This album just improves with time and repeated listenings. It was produced at an interesting, challenging and personally difficult time for McCartney, with his wife's illness clearly at the front of his mind, and reflected in many of the songs recorded here. It also came at a time when the massive Beatles Anthology project had just concluded, and you can hear the freshness in the songwriting as a result - yes, it sounds Beatlesque, but with a modern, updated feel that reflects where McCartney was at this period in his life.

All the musical influences that shaped McCartney's writing and playing to date seem reflected here. Family values are mentioned in many of the lyrics, a sense of being grateful for what life brings shines through, and there is warmth, blues, reflection, fear, uncertainty and anxiousness all wrapped in the directness of well-crafted storytelling within the medium of popular song. With experienced musicians onboard such as Steve Miller, Jeff Lynne and Ringo Starr, the backing is first-rate, but no-one is allowed to forget whose solo album this is: make no mistake, this is Macca's record.

McCartney seems at ease with who he is on this beautifully realised album. Mature enough to be looking forwards as well as backwards (with less bitterness perhaps than was the case when the Beatles first broke up) - this is superior pop making from someone as vulnerable to the ups and downs of the life as the rest of us - but just able to channel it all into accessible songwriting. It's a masterpiece.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Macca`s melancholy masterpiece, 1 Mar. 2011
By 
GlynLuke (York UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Flaming Pie (Audio CD)
Flaming Pie (a phrase once thought up by a certain Mr Lennon) was written & recorded while Paul McC was living with the painful knowledge of wife Linda`s cancer, and its probable outcome. This may account for so many tender and nostalgic ballads but it doesn`t explain why this is so damn good, Paul`s very best album since well before the Beatles split, a near-perfect hour or so of immediately likeable, well-crafted songs, with none of either the tweeness or the bombast that blighted so many of his recordings in the past, from Ram through Band on the Run, which I never liked much, to many of the later efforts.
Well, Linda died the following year, the tragedy of which gives this post-Beatles career-best album a poignancy at times beyond words.
Many of the songs seem in retrospect to be both loving acts of mutual remembering and bittersweet songs of remembrance. Some of Paul`s loveliest songs are here: Somedays, Calico Skies, Heaven on a Sunday, Souvenir, Little Willow, Beautiful Night. That makes almost half the album, all melodic ballads the equal of anything he`s written. The more uptempo tracks are, with perhaps one slightly throwaway exception (Really Love You) as good as the others. Linda - her swansong - sings on a few tracks, and there are contributions from Jeff Lynne (discreet for once), Ringo on drums, and the great Steve Miller, an old mate of Paul`s, who duets with him on a raggedy blues knees-up, Used To Be Bad, their voices complementing each other and Miller playing some mean lead guitar.
John, Paul, George & Ringo all inflicted some appalling trash on an innocent public
after a certain group (we didn`t really have `bands` then) split up, as well as the odd good album or memorable song. But Flaming Pie sounds to me like the best thing any of them have put out since Sgt Pepper. (George`s Cloud Nine is pretty fine, too.)
I play these songs only a few times a year, to keep them fresh. They always sound as wonderful as they did on first or second hearing. Paul`s now-grainier voice helps too, having lost some of its perennial boyishness, gaining in gravitas.
A beautiful record.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Not to be missed, 4 May 2012
This review is from: Flaming Pie (Audio CD)
I have had this record since it first came out and as i get older my thoughts on it have changed.
I was a young teenager mad for The Beatles when i first got it in 97 and thought it was a great album full of rocking tunes.
I am now at the ripe old age of 33 and i put this album on again recently and listened from start to finish.
What struck me most was how the recurring theme of being there for a loved one and wanting to hold them comes up in the songs,it was something that i had not noticed before and i am amazed that i missed it...
Of course Linda was dying of cancer at the time of the albums making and wherever it was deliberate or note you can't help feel that alot of these lyrics that McCartney puts down are in reference to this..
Yes there are still rocking tunes on here ("The World Tonight" being a highlight)but even with them there is that sence of not wanting to let go and thinking over your past and time spent together.
It is simply one of Paul's most personal albums i feel and given that it was also done after The Anthology still feels fresh and new and while his albums since have been interesting and excellent he hasn't topped this gem...

Standout tracks have to be "World Tonight" "Somedays" & "Beautiful Night"
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars They don't call him 'Sir' for nothing!, 2 Sept. 2001
This review is from: Flaming Pie (Audio CD)
'Flaming Pie' is a classic album. The Beatles were excellent, Wings were good, but it just goes to show with this album that Sir Paul McCartney can still cut it!
The best songs are: "The World Tonight," "Somedays", "Souvenir" and "Beautiful Night" - they are classic Macca! He really is on top form.
Obviously, there are a few duds, though. "Used To Be Bad" sounds like the spontaneous jam that it is meant to be and "If You Wanna" features some atrocious lyrics. But generally, 'Flaming Pie' is an absolute joy of an album - musically accomplished and excellent, and lyrically extremely refreshing!
Even Ringo crops up on a few tracks, and the producer Jeff Lynne, makes sure that McCartney is largely left in control of the way it sounds - and boy, does it sound good!
Sit back, relax, dim the lights, grab your acoustic guitar and spend an evening with the greatest living legend of all time!
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