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43 of 45 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fab 4s Final one still sounds good 30 years later!
Reviewing the Beatles may seem like a waste of time as everything that could have been written about them has been - but the continuing interest with the anthologies, the tribute bands and the consistent sales still make them probably the most listened to band that will ever be. LET IT BE was first released in 1970, a patchwork album of material originally scheduled to...
Published on 28 April 2000 by JIM DOYLE

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Buy "Let It Be - Naked" instead
The first time I heard "Let It Be", I sat afterwards and couldn't believe what I've just heard. Great classics like "Get Back", "Let It Be" (the song), "Across The Universe", "The Long And Winding Road" and "Dig A Pony" were haphazardly blended with throwaway songs like "Dig It" and "Maggie Mae", and the...
Published 2 months ago by Tina Sejersbøll


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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Their weakest is better than many artists' best, 6 Nov 2006
By 
D. J. H. Thorn "davethorn13" (Hull, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Let It Be (Audio CD)
For most of their recording career, The Beatles did very little that could be described as just 'okay'. The overwhelming majority of their recordings are fantastic and a small percentage are either atrocious or, at best, mediocre. So when they made an album containing songs that didn't stand out from the crowd, perhaps breaking up wasn't such a bad move.

'Let It Be' does, nevertheless, contain two of the most famous songs of all time, the title track and 'Get Back'. Both the peace-vibe of 'Across The Universe' and the touching 'The Long And Winding Road' are of a high standard too, though Phil Spector's embellishments do them no favours. Beyond this, greatness is in short supply. The chirpy, acoustic 'Two Of Us' sounds more like a Wings moment, good but no classic. Similarly, 'One After 909', a ten-year-old rock and roll song dusted down is decent, a fun track. George Harrison's 'I Me Mine' sounds like a cross between a French chanson and a boogie workout. It's an imaginative effort but the production makes it sound timid. His 'For You Blue' has a wonderful, chopping rhythm, but his reference to Elmore James gives away its derivation. The other three tracks are worthless.

The sleeve boasts of live performances, but it's doubtful whether the album benefits from such a feature. For me, it results in a fairly ordinary production, made worse by Spector's grand ideas. 'Get Back' is suited to the live approach, so had The Beatles gone back to rock and roll for the rest of the album, it might have worked better. As it is, it's only poor relative to their other releases, but it's one of those albums best heard before you decide whether to buy.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A MUCH UNDERATED SWANSONG FROM A FAB FOURSOME, 19 Sep 2003
By 
PETER XUEREB (SYDNEY, NEW SOUTH WALES Australia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Let It Be (Audio CD)
The basic the reason this album has had such mixed opinions and reactions ("cheap skate epitaph" as one reviewer put it in 1970), is because of the HUGE benchmark they lads set in the 8 years prior to it's release. I really don't think people grasp how high that standard really is when one continually hears about the "next big thing that will be bigger the the Beatles" (Oasis, Spice Girls etc. etc.). It's impossible for acts to achieve that standard today because the Beatles were BOTH talented and prolific notwithstanding the HUGE influence they've had on their peers and those that followed in their rather large footsteps. Their music continues to be played nearly 40 years after original release. Next to nothing released these days will have that kind of longetiivity (except for maybe U2 and bands of that class).
So onto the album itself which, considering the circumstances surrounding it's recording and eventual, if somewhat delayed release, is still quite good. Phil Spector did do the job asked of him...his brief was make something out of the 90+ hour morass of tapes which were (to paraphrase Mr. Lennon) recorded with a bad feel about them making an album that could be acceptably presented to the public and tieing in with the film release of "Let It Be". The whole "no overdubs" thing went out the window long before Phil got his hands on these recordings and he made an album that is still quite listenable and enjoyable. We know about McCartney's trio of classics..."Get Back", "Let It Be" & "Long & Winding Road". It's interesting to listen to the "clean" version of this last track on "Anthology 3" to grasp what Paul meant with his critisicm of Spector's overdubs, which here are definitely overdone. The orchestra & heavenly choir have definitely not been recorded "dry" here. Complementing these tracks are the beautifully gentle "Two Of Us" with wonderful harmony vocals from John & Paul (with a nod to Phil & Don Everly), "One After 909", an old rocker originally recorded in 1963 (see "Anthology 1") but never released at the time and "Ive Got A Feeling" which I quite like, especially the vocal interplay between John & Paul. George's contributions are solid with "For You Blue" featuring some rather funny slide guitar from John and the simple watlz timed "I Me Mine" which was extended from a short 1.42 and fleshed out with Spector's strings and choirs again. Check out "Anthology 3" again for a comparison with George's original version.
Yes "Let It Be" might be considered a lesser effort compared with "A Hard Day's Night" "Pepper", "Revolver", "Abbey Road" "The Beatles" (White Album) and "Rubber Soul", but those albums were amazing feats of magic. The Beatles, even while bickering and growing apart, still managed to put some really great music on this album. They were, as Paul often says, "a great little rock band". Let's face it, some artists would love to claim The Beatles' "lesser efforts" as their own..especially some of their classic single "B" Sides and other non-LP tracks. It's history that the superior "Abbey Road" (my favorite Beatles album) followed these recordings. Not bad for a band that was falling apart for the last 2-3 years of it's lifetime. "Let It Be" rightly it deserves it's place in the Beatles' Catalogue if only as a historical marker in the lifetime of a truly incredible group.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is my favourite one, yeah, it really is, 29 Jan 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Let It Be (Audio CD)
I know, it is not normal to prefer "Let it be" over all the other Beatles stuff. But I fell in love with it when I first heard it (must have been in 1981). I bought it and listened to no other thing for months. It kind of summarizes their career, ranging from the raw rock songs "One after 909", "I Dig a Pony" and "I've got a feeling" of the early phase to the sophistication of songs such as "Let it be", "The Long and Winding Road" (sure, the arrangements sound like Andrew Lloyd Webber, but then I like ALW ;-) and "Across the Universe" (by the way, I prefer the album version of "Let it be" to the singles version, particularly for George's solo - on the single (Blue Album) it sounds like an organ solo). Then there is also the acoustic McCartney ballad "Two of us", the steel-guitar and high-piano-based "For you blue" by George, and the short "Dig it" and "Maggie Mae" (probably taken out from longer jam sessions). And there is "I Me Mine" - this has always been my favourite song, hymn-like in the main passages with very hard rocking middle parts. I don't know whether this is the best Beatles CD but it is the one I love most because it came at exactly the right moment, when I was really open for it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent remaster, 25 May 2012
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This review is from: Let It Be (Audio CD)
Let It Be is the 12th and final studio album released by Beatles, being together. It was released 1970 by the band's Apple Records label shortly after the group announced their break-up. At that time always remember a discussion which is the last Beatles album Abey Road or Let it Be..., becaue it was known that most tracks of let it be was recorded in 1969. From my point of view, one of the best albums in terms of content and composition. This remastered version has a very high quality and high/low frequency ratio sound. The album comes with previously not seen photos in form of small photo album. Strongly recommend this album.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Definitive 'Let it Be', 11 Feb 2012
By 
Brianig (London, UK.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Let It Be (Audio CD)
This definitive version of 'Let it Be', now remastered, has been unfairly criticised over the years for the Phil Spector production. However, when you see the film or listen to the numerous other versions of this material, it's a small miracle that such an enduring and enjoyable album could have been conjured from these sessions.

Spector's orchestrations may be a bit syrupy but they're not so far removed from 'Good Night' on the White Album. Ironically, some themes from the orchestral arrangement of 'The Long and Winding Road' seem to have been retained by Paul in his superb 'Broad Street' and subsequent live arrangements of the song. The un-orchestrated version of this song on 'Let it Be - Naked' does sound slightly unfinished, especially given John's tentative bass-playing. Spector shows the scale and majesty of this powerful song although I'm sure Paul and George Martin could have done it even better at another time.

The album also gives us a superior remixed recording of 'Across the Universe' which is a timeless song that could so easily have got lost in the chaos. Had its reputation depended only on the 'World Wildlife Fund' version it would not be so highly regarded as it is now.

The humour of the original 'Let it Be' album has always been part of its warmth. It also gives us that blistering guitar solo on 'Let it Be' itself which is perversely mixed out on all the other commercial releases of the track. Finally, unlike the two earlier Glyn Johns track-lists which were prepared for release, this, the album we've all grown up with or grown older with, gives us the best of the rooftop concert and the genuine feel of that occasion (even if 'Get Back' is an edit and 'Don't Let Me Down' should have been on the album).

It would be great to have the film released on DVD/Blu-Ray perhaps in a replica of the original LP box with a deluxe package of extras, but that seems unlikely. It's a real shame. The cleaned-up clips included on 'Anthology' look and sound great.

At least the album we've had since 1970, together with the 'Get Back'/'Don't Let Me Down' single, are already the best of the recordings of these wonderful songs.

Perhaps at lunchtime on 30th January 2019 the full rooftop session can be played loud from the roof of 3 Savile Row, with a suitable police presence, to celebrate the 50th Anniversary.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Let It Be - Better 'Naked', 2 Nov 2011
By 
This review is from: Let It Be (Audio CD)
This is the Beatles project that documents the group falling apart better than any other. There had been tension the year before during 'The White Album' sessions, and there would be strange, weary resignation during 'Abbey Road', yet somehow it didn't show itself on those records. With 'Let It Be', we had the movie as well, so we could see how tired and sometimes bored the group looked, and the long, unwilling sessions that eventually yielded this album.

John only wanted to be with Yoko ; George got pissed off with Paul again, and Ringo patiently tried to do his job. When they heard what they had recorded, they shelved it. So what we finally got was Phil Spector's weird mish-mash of 'live and raw but with strings and choirs dubbed on'.

Many years later, with the benefit of today's technology, the album was scrubbed down, finally resequenced to sound like an album, shorn of a few bits of chat and throwaway jams and released as 'Let It Be Naked'. And for me, that's the one to go for.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much better than some would have you believe, 5 May 2005
By 
Peter Durward Harris "Pete the music fan" (Leicester England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Let It Be (Audio CD)
By normal standards, this is a brilliant album. By Beatles standards, this is a weak album, simply because they had recorded so many outstanding albums before they did this one. Nevertheless, there are some outstanding songs here.
My favorite song here is Long and winding road, a song apparently inspired by a road in the Mull of Kintyre. Paul McCartney originally offered the song to Tom Jones, who had previously covered some other Beatles songs, but Tom politely declined thinking the song was not likely to be a big hit. Tom regretted his decision after seeing the Beatles take it to number one in America. In Britain, the Beatles did not release their version as a single so it became a minor hit (and the only hit) for Ray Morgan, about whom I know nothing else.
Get back and the title track were both huge Beatles hit on both sides of the Atlantic and, like Long and winding road, are well up to the standard expected of the Beatles. Of the other songs, I particularly like Across the universe (the only other track here to make it on to the Blue album 1967 to 1970), One after 909 (which I didn't really appreciate until I heard Willie Nelson's cover - and I still prefer that to the original), Two of us (the opening track) and the traditional Maggie Mae. The other songs are fine but not as brilliant as we'd come to expect from the Beatles.
If, by some fluke, this is the first Beatles album you hear, you'll be wondering how anybody could criticize it. If, on the other hand, you've heard some of their other albums, this one may come as a huge disappointment. The reality is that it's definitely worth a listen (indeed, several listens), but if you haven't got the other Beatles albums buy them first.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars not quite as bad as its reputation, 10 May 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Let It Be (Audio CD)
By anyone else's standards, this would be a great LP, if not a classic, but by the enormously high standards the Beatles set themselves, it can only disappoint.
Having said that, songs featured here include the affecting, though not over-sentimental, "Across The Universe", the gospel-tinged title track, "The Long and Winding Road" (the Spector wall of sound actually doesn't sound so bad, even though it was the straw that broke the camel's back for MacCartney and led to his resignation) and the brilliant "Get Back".
Most of it sounds as if it was recorded in a broom cupboard, not Abbey Road or the roof of the Apple boutique, but in a way that lends a certain charm to otherwise nondescript ditties such as "Dig It", "Dig A Pony" and "The One After 909". This is Year Zero music (a full 6 years before punk), with evidence, some say, of the Beatles sabotaging each others' works. It's raw, it's not always beautiful, but it's honest and - for some of the time at least - passionate. A kind of "Please Please Me" with beards, if you will.
As an example of great creative symmetry, and a return to your earliest roots in terms of style - and quality! - "Let It Be" succeeds, but its roughness cannot hide the brilliance of a band which changed the course of music forever.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Let It Be reissue, 31 Aug 2014
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This review is from: Let It Be [VINYL] (Vinyl)
Vinyl format.
Nice polished modern reissue which comes on 180g vinyl and sturdier sleeve than previous repressings. The disc is housed in a plain inner sleeve with protective lining and the labels are the traditional Apple labels albeit with modern copyright notices. The set is shrink wrapped and has a sticker advising its part of the stereo remaster sets of 2009. Overall good reissue of standard release.
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Never intended for release..., 12 Nov 2002
This review is from: Let It Be (Audio CD)
This isn't really a Beatles album, as it was never really intended for release as such - it is songs recorded for the film of the same title that was shelved during the band's lifetime.

Produced by Phil Spector as George Martin refused to produce it on the grounds that the recordings were not of good enough quality, and Paul MacCartney publicly distancing themselves from the project, it didn't seem like it would be a success.

However, on some tracks Spector has done a good job, and it's hard for the genius of the band's songwriters not to shine through this half-finished material. Tracks like 'Across the Universe', 'Let it Be', 'Get Back' and 'For you Blue' are obviously classic Beatles, but then...

...there is some terrible stuff on here that the band would probably have thrown out normally. Paul McCartney was allegedly furious that 'Long and Winding Road' was released as a single in the US when he heard it, and it's not surprising considering how bad his vocal is on it. If the material here that was good had been put together with the B-sides that had never made it on to albums, then it would have been a great album to put out in the wake of the band's demise.

It's a shame that both good and bad are put together on a Beatles album, and there probably isn't another album that they made in which this is the case.
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