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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars one of the best from the best.
by this time in their careers, the beatles were striving for a different approach to their music; this album shows just that.

heavier guitar riffs, different kind of lyrics but also spending more time in the recording studio. the right decision in my view, as they had ceased to function as a live group due to the increasing noise of the fans.

as...
Published on 13 July 2006 by Mr. A. E. Ward Davies

versus
22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 73 stars for the music...Re-mastering is strange in places...
I've lived with the new digitally re-mastered Revolver for nearly a month and changing my review a little... (Date - October 7th 2009).

In comparison to the 1987 CD the sound is definitely fuller. On each track there is a better balance between vocals and instruments and more detail can be heard in the instruments too. (The 1987 CD higlighted the vocals a...
Published on 14 Sep 2009 by M. Norman


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars one of the best from the best., 13 July 2006
By 
Mr. A. E. Ward Davies (Canterbury , England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Revolver (Audio CD)
by this time in their careers, the beatles were striving for a different approach to their music; this album shows just that.

heavier guitar riffs, different kind of lyrics but also spending more time in the recording studio. the right decision in my view, as they had ceased to function as a live group due to the increasing noise of the fans.

as for the tracks on this album, my personal favourites are: "here, there and everywhere," "for no one," "and your bird can sing," "she said she said," " i want to tell you" and "i'm only sleeping."

an example of how music should be produced; skill, perfection and a touch or two of genius.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best Beatles - & an all-time essential classic!!!, 13 Dec 2004
By 
Danny Neill (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Revolver (Audio CD)
Can it possibly be the case that there are still people around unaware of the pop perfection that is to be found on the Beatles greatest album 'Revolver'?. I would like to think that surely not, for it seems that some time ago the general consensus of opinion shifted away from 'Pepper' and towards this previous years long player as being the collection that truly attains the kind of musical achievements that has remained the standard barer for all pop music that's followed. If there is such a thing as the uninitiated, the reasons are simple; as Paul McCartney understated in a recent interview "the Beatles were an interesting mixture of characters" and just as all the players in a football team performing to the peak of their capabilities can produce a beautiful spectacle so it was in 1966 that all four Beatles were on the top of their respective games, blending together to produce a work that perfectly combines their fascinating mixture of personalities and talents.
Not only did George Harrison throw into the 'Revolver' melting pot a couple of mid-sixties guitar-pop gems with 'Taxman' and 'I Want To Tell You', but he was also starting to properly spread his musical wings to India as best evidenced on the sitar drenched 'Love You To'. This was really the first Beatles album on which George Harrison really made his presence felt. Meanwhile John Lennon, who in the early years had been a solid rock & roll leader of the band, was drifting further into his acid-head psychedelic phase that gave the Beatles their experimental cutting edge during this 66-'67 period, and it's on 'Revolver' that the loop-frenzy quantum-leap of 'Tomorrow Never Knows' can be found - a track that still sounds futuristic today and has inspired whole careers; just look at the sampling DJ duo the Chemical Brothers for an example. So while John Lennon was pushing down the musical barriers, Paul McCartney had effectively responded by composing the best songs of his career, 'Revolver' contains five McCartney originals that touch a level of song-writing, both lyrically and melodically, that he has never really bettered - but that's not to knock McCartney for neither has anyone else and songs like 'Here There And Everywhere', 'Eleanor Rigby' and 'Good Day Sunshine' remain the greatest in his long career. And that leaves Ringo, proving all over this record that he is in fact one of the most under-rated drummers in music while his vocal on the children's classic 'Yellow Submarine' highlights a wonderful group effort showing four musicians on peak creative form still pulling 100% in the same direction. That's why this is the greatest album by the worlds greatest ever pop band....simple!
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69 of 73 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Beatles best album... and here's why, 22 Oct 2005
This review is from: Revolver (Audio CD)
Overshadowed by the massive adulation afforded to "Sgt. Pepper" - which for at least two decades after was considered the Beatles, and even rock music's finest hour - time has shown "Revolver" not only to be a better but much more pivotal work.
Why? Well caught, in early 1966, between a global audience who simply wanted more of their peerlessly tuneful "pop" songs, and a musical mind-set that was a million miles away from where they'd been only a year or so before, the Beatles pulled off the extraordinary feat of pushing rock music's boundaries out to the edge while showing that musical innovation could still be integrated into a satisfying melodic framework. The result? Well at its most extreme "Revolver" has "Tomorrow Never Knows" & "Love to You" (two of the mid-60's best avant-garde tracks) colliding head-on with "Here There and Everywhere" "Eleanor Rigby" & "For No One" (three of the most beautiful MOR ballads ever made) with each sitting, quite comfortably, within what has to be the broadest musical canvas ever committed to disc.
But it's what goes on between these extremes that makes "Revolver" such a brilliant album. In "Taxman", "I'm Only Sleeping", "She Said She Said", "And Your Bird Can Sing", "Doctor Robert" & "I Want to Tell You" the Beatles took the explorations that others (most notably the Yardbirds and the Byrds) had started and then applied their outstanding song-writing skills to them to show just how good this new music could be. And, because it was so good, they catapulted it straight into "the mainstream", laying down a reference point which others were bound to follow. What happened over the following year of huge musical change, culminating in "Sgt. Pepper's" anthemic but far less challenging celebration of it, owed a huge debt to "Revolver" - not only the Beatles best album but the catalyst for a scale shift in rock music.
If you haven't done so recently, play it and be amazed... and if you still don't own it, get it straight away.
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37 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the most important album ever made, 21 Feb 2003
This review is from: Revolver (Audio CD)
In 1966, the Beach Boys released their masterpiece, 'Pet Sounds', after being inspired by the Beatles' 'Rubber Soul' which had been released the previous year. It presented a creative challenge to the Beatles, and the world waited to see whether they could respond with an album worthy of restoring their primacy in the compelling artistic competition between the two bands. With 'Revolver', they did that and more.
Here we have the most important exponents of popular music captured at the peak of their powers. Containing the finest moments of Lennon ('Tomorrow Never Knows'), McCartney ('Eleanor Rigby') and Harrison ('Taxman'), 'Revolver' is not merely the best album by the Beatles, but quite possibly the best album by anyone.
More seamlessly than any of the Beatles' albums, 'Revolver' combines entertainment with innovation. Even its poppiest tracks, such as 'And Your Bird Can Sing' and 'Doctor Robert', feature pioneering qualities - the most notable of which are the aggressively guitar-driven melodies. Indeed, for the prominence of the lead guitar, this is the most Harrisonian of all their albums. Even more original is McCartney's 'Eleanor Rigby' - in my opinion the greatest of all the Beatles' songs. That a normal human being like you or I could produce something so special with a violin, a voice and 120 seconds of recording tape is extraordinary.
The motherlode of imagination, however, is Lennon's 'Tomorrow Never Knows' which, despite being the first track to be recorded in the 'Revolver' sessions, provides the album's finale. Built on a recurring drum loop and backed by psychedelic sound effects, Lennon's vocal soars (reaching a glorious zenith with "love is all and love is everyone") despite being engineered to sound remote and detached. 'Tomorrow Never Knows' achieves the impossible in being both psychedelic and perfectly coherent and convincing. And this, remember, was pretty much their first attempt at psychedlia.
'Revolver' represents the genesis of modern rock. It is integral to the history and development of popular music, and should be passed down from generation to generation as solemnly as a family heirloom. Maybe if the Beatles hadn't recorded it, someone else would have eventually come along and made something of similar quality and importance. We, however, cannot know and must therefore revere this plastic disc as Christians revere the Bible.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars masterpiece, 20 July 2006
By 
sean paul mccann "mccanns23" (ireland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Revolver (Audio CD)
the beatles seventh album,revolver, was released in 1966 and it must be said that they were only recording for 3 years and were already on album seven so you can see how hard they worked,but what you must also believe is that the quality of the albums was never compromised and revolver is yet another bonafide masterpiece.

Some critics have said that this album was the first time that all four individual members clicked at exactly the same time,true or not,this is still an album that proved that perfection was within the beatles standards.It is also the first time that george harrison contributed as fully ,with three of his songs making it onto the album,and ringo even contributed the line 'father mckenzie,writing the words to a sermon that no one will hear' on eleanor rigby but he didnt actually get songwriting credit for it.

The album featured string arrangements as in eleanor rigby,backward guitar distortion as in im only sleeping,experimentation certainly played a part in this album in terms of technology and maybe even illegal substances.

There isnt a bad song on here,the highlights include,actually i cant highlight any as they are all excellent,seldom has an album felt as perfect,the beatles were now ready for their greatest series of albums in a row and it started from here!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What they should have done, 12 Feb 2011
This review is from: Revolver (Audio CD)
I totally agree with most of the reviews concerning the quality of the music on this fantastic album. The Beatles were the greatest band ever and nobody is going to tell me anything different! This is the album where they first started really pushing the boundaries in the studio and experimenting with different sounds to try and enhance the songs. If you have listened to the anthology albums of this period you may have got an insight into how the songs developed from humble beginnings to the final master, this is where they owe a lot to George Martin. However on songs like `I'm Only Sleeping' they didn't always get it right. I actually prefer the acoustic anthology version without all the reverse tape trickery! Incidentally another Lennon song they messed about with in the studio on the Sgt. Pepper album (`Good Morning, Good Morning') on which they added a load of dumb animal noises and other sound affects' also sounds 100% better on the anthology album! So sometimes the studio trickery doesn't always improve a song. I guess sometimes you can't see the wood for the trees, or what's the other way of putting it - less is more?

However the one thing that disappoints me with this album, is I would have liked to see -as with all these re-mastered releases - the inclusion of the singles that were recorded during and around the album sessions. This may not please the purists, but I feel that songs like `Paperback Writer' and the b-side of that single `Rain' (what was a song of that magnitude doing on a b-side? - Incredible!) deserve to be included on a bona-fide album and as in this case it wouldn't make Revolver over long. I know that back in the sixties singles often weren't included on albums because as I recall McCartney once saying in an interview `we didn't want to rip off the fans'. In truth in those days there was a separate market for singles, more so than in later years. But this is now the 21st century and as I still believe in the album as an art form, I think great songs like that should be given a proper home on a classic album (as opposed to a compilation album). The same goes for `Strawberry Fields/Penny Lane' (Pepper), `Hey Jude/Revolution' (White) etc.

As for the `Red & Blue' compilation albums - while I'm on my soapbox - put some more tracks on them - like `Taxman' & `I'm Only Sleeping'.

To sum up: Revolver stands the test of time, it was great in the sixties and it still is today, get it in whatever version you can but get it!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The clearest portrait of what made The Beatles great, August 5, 2000, 2 Nov 2007
This review is from: Revolver (Audio CD)
The Beatles' overall achievement is rivaled by no one. In a course of only seven years, they produced 12 and ½ albums (I don't count YELLOW SUBMARINE as a full album), one of which was a double album, and enough independent singles to make up two other albums. Very prolific, and the single most important band ever to grace the rock'n'roll scene. There is countless debates on what is their most important, but to me every one of those albums from Rubber Soul on (excepting YELLOW SUBMARINE) is a self-contained masterpiece.
That being said, REVOLVER gives us the most balanced view of The Beatles that we ever get. Everything that made The Beatles great is here in the right proportions. We have the three tracks of Harrison, including an Indian song of his, we have the ultimate Ringo song (everyone should know what song I'm talking about here), we have Paul's melodious love songs that would overwhelm his solo career, and we have the standard Lennon experimentation. On no other record do we get such a clear picture of what each Beatle brought into the equation. Everyone of them shine for their individual talents. The direct opposite of this is THE WHITE ALBUM, when The Beatles were in the process of breaking up.

In terms of artistic growth (remember, this was released almost a year after Help!, which was released August 6, 1965 and this August 5, 1965) we knew The Beatles were onto something. It foreshadows everything that will happen on SGT PEPPER, and is as important as its successor. And in terms of what made The Beatles great, this is the record to go too, because it gives you the most balanced view of the most important band in rock'n'roll history

Originally issued on Amazon.com on August 5, 2000
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best of the best, 16 Aug 2006
By 
This review is from: Revolver (Audio CD)
From the count in at the start of "taxman" to the piano fade-out on "tomorrow never knows" the album doesn't produce a dull track. Each song showing painstaking attention to detail - the backwards guitars on "i'm only sleeping" and "tomorrow never knows", actually McCartneys solo in Taxman played backwards, to the sound effects on "yellow submarine". The album bursts with inspiration.

All three of the songwriters shine, Harrison produces an unprecedented 3 songs, including the kickstart to the album with "Taxman" and "Love You To" builds on Norwegian Woods sitar work this time the Indian influence isn't just an add-on but used to base an entire song.

McCartney's "good day sunshine" shows the beauty in simplicity, Eleanor Rigby hints at the groups future use of outside instrumentalists and the love songs "here there and everywhere", "for no one" and provides Ringo with his cameo in "yellow submarine"

But the best moments come from Lennon's LSD inspired "she said, she said" the only song on the album McCartney isn't involved in after a studio argument, inspired after a meeting with Peter Fonda in Los Angeles who claimed to "know what it's like to be dead". Plus "tomorrow never knows" which sounds like nothing ever made before - or after, a true combined effort, McCartney, Harrison and Starr supply the woozy tape loops,and Lennon steals the lyrics from Timothy Learys guide to having a perfect trip.

Even the cover kicks ass.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Revolver evolver, 26 Oct 2006
By 
D. J. H. Thorn "davethorn13" (Hull, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Revolver (Audio CD)
Fantastic songs, fantastic arrangements, fantastic performances, just...fantastic. This, for me, is the second best album of all time, in context anyway. The best is the one that followed it, although I can understand why so many people prefer 'Revolver' to 'Sgt Pepper'. It doesn't contain as much clutter. Pop and rock musicians everywhere would sell their souls to make an album this good.

'Taxman' is a rock song with a great groove. No wonder Paul Weller nicked it for his no. 1 song, 'Start'. Bill Clinton said that 'Eleanor Rigby' gave him a chill down his spine: ghost story rock, anyone? John Lennon's 'I'm Only Sleeping' is one of those almost lazily effortless nuggets that endears him to you. The Indian sounds of George Harrison's 'Love You To' are secondary to its marvellous melody. 'Here, There and Everywhere' is one of the most gorgeous love songs ever written, a sort of soulmate for Brian Wilson's beautiful 'God Only Knows'. 'Yellow Submarine' is great fun the first time around and the jokey effects in the middle are a laugh. This song only annoys you if you listen to it too often, though many people profess to unreservedly hate it. 'She Said She Said' is another compelling rock song inspired by actor Peter Fonda's comment, 'I know what it's like to be dead' while he was under the influence.

Side two of the LP begins with Paul McCartney's infectious, upbeat 'Good Day Sunshine' with its vaguely music hall piano touch. 'And Your Bird Can Sing' is cut from a similar cloth as 'I'm Only Sleeping', though it's a tad more lively. 'For No One' is a delicate, memorable and brief gem featuring harpsichord and French horn. I had to study this song for an Open University course a couple of years ago. 'Doctor Robert' is similar to 'Taxman' in feel and just as satirical. 'I Want To Tell You' has one of those great folky guitar openings that draws you in and an odd but ingenious piano motif. 'Got To Get You Into My Life' is McCartney going gloriously funky, though I'd never have guessed that it was about drugs if I hadn't read it. Finally, 'Tomorrow Never Knows' is a fine, meditative song in its own right, but the eerie effects lend it another dimension and point toward future recordings.

Not everyone likes The Beatles of course and many are sick of hearing about them. But this album is a reminder that they are probably the only major recording artists who are not over-rated, merely over-exposed. It's clear from some of the reviews on here that there are quite a few people out there who are intent on putting them down. Yet I can't imagine anyone listening to 'Revolver' without prejudice and being so scathing. It's been said so many times that it's almost boring, but The Beatles are the best by a mile and 'Revolver' is evidence of that. Just enjoy.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best beatles, 11 July 2006
By 
This review is from: Revolver (Audio CD)
Revolver...This is, quite simply, the best Beatles album there is! Of course that is a very hard choice, I think they have all been my favorite at some point, but none more so then Revolver. Discribed by many as 'Rubber Soul's other side' I would disagree and change it to 'Rubber soul's BETTER side.' Revolver, to window Beatles fans, hasn't a lot of the huge hits on. For someone who doesnt know the songs for example, they are proibly likly to only know two or three off Reveolver, Yellow submarine, Eleanor Rigby and Tomorrow never knows to name them. But the album shines from start to finish. This is how all albums should be; played from start to finish without skipping a single track. From Harrisons 'Taxman' you are immdeatly interested, to Mccartneys 'Here there and everywhere' and finishing with Lennon's Tomorrow never knows. However my favorites have to be 'And your bird can sing' and 'For no one' in which Mccartney plays every instument on the track while the rest of the Beatles were *famously said by lennon* 'sitting outside drinking tea.' This album simply is a must have for everyone. BUY IT NOW!
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Revolver
Revolver by The Beatles (Audio CD - 1998)
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