Customer Reviews


43 Reviews
5 star:
 (30)
4 star:
 (6)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


33 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Little Britain
This album is the point in Blur's rambling musical career where it all came together. The band may well disagree with this, but this is the most cohesive album they produced. Rather than remembering Blur for two and a half minutes of screaming (Song 2) or for their tussles with Oasis (Country house, Charmless man), I'd suggest you take a look at this album.
Its...
Published on 29 Nov 2003 by fallen_angel38

versus
11 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A touch of the nineties
There are some fine moments here but like another scribe pointed out, much of it is very much of its time. The title track is the best example of this - mildly infectious novelty pop back in 1994, it has been flogged to death so mercilessly that it is now really rather irratating. "Girls and Boys" fares a little better but the other upbeat tracks - "Tracy Jacks", "London...
Published on 9 Sep 2002 by bowieclone


Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 90's Britain on a Disc., 29 Nov 2010
By 
J. Arthur "Axl" (U.k) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Parklife (Audio CD)
When you say name me some 90's albums this record always pops up and does really stick in the mind of people who grow up in the 90's. But I was only born in 1995 so I only got the late years in and to be honest which three year old cares about music they want the new toy story buzz lighter figure. So this was a big album for my older brother and I thought I would give 90's Britain a chance to pop back for an hour or so and honestly i am very impressed in what I am hearing. This is an album to own even if you knew of Blur and you want to add something to add to your collection of music this is easily acceptable for anyone wanting to find a new music sound to listen to or find what Blur means to them. Each track gives you an image of what life was like at the time and the title track is nothing i have ever hard before and I honestly think I have not heard anything close since of getting this album. The tracks Beetle bum,Girls & Boys and of course Parklife(Song) are Blur classics so what does the rest of the album hold for the new listener Tracy Jacks and End of the Century are yet truly magical songs also with the To the End which is yet a quite serious track. Something that you can sling in your car and rive to over and over on a long road trip and really absorb Blur at there full. There vocals are powerful and so are the melody's perfect for any new musicians that want to learn the old fashion way of getting your influencing bands and this is one of them for me. Just get the album so at least you can say you own it or play it on a rainy say. But with me i liked to listen to it everywhere and when ever so really give it a try.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 20 April 2010
By 
R. Dyr°y "the Anglophile" (Norway) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Parklife (Audio CD)
This is one of Blur's best records. The title track is absolutely superb, but the whole record is definitely worth a try.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding, 5 July 2009
By 
Guy Peters - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Parklife (Audio CD)
... and then "Girls & Boys" was released and the whole thing EXPLODED! Sounding like cheap Giorgio Moroder, but then roughly taken by both Nile Rodgers and those Sparks dudes, it's a song that's almost too kitschy to be true. The word "plastic" is all over it - from the mechanised drum beats, to the jumpy bass line, to Albarn's mega-silly chorus ("Girls who are boys who like boys to be girls who do boys like they're girls who do girls like they're boys, etc") - but still, you're dealing with a indisputably classic single. Although the single and album weren't the bravest renewal the band ever went through (in many ways, the unanticipated Modern Life was a much more drastic change), this continuation of blatantly updating the British pop-tradition worked excellent. This time around, the mishmash of styles and sounds becomes even more eclectic and, despite the fact that it took them only a year to make this album (compared to the three of the previous album), the songs are by and large of a high quality and confidently performed. ...And that's an understatement, since you just can hear the band knew it had hit the right button and was at the top of its game. Parklife is an album that's multi-layered, especially musically, with melodic hooks, catchy (backing) vocals and a whole bunch of sounds continuously entering and leaving the picture.

"Girls & Boys" is merely the tip of the iceberg. There's also the new wave-tribute "Trouble in the Message Centre" (those phony synths! that laconic delivery!), the brash punk of "Bank Holiday" (their scruffiest song yet) and the arrogant swagger of "Jubilee" that sounds as if Johnny Thunders himself stood up from the grave to join them. Even more striking are the band's own attempts at "classic" song-writing. Take "End of the Century," for instance. If that song isn't a classic on a par with late-`60's Beatles or Kinks, I don't know a thing about music. Of course, this kind of pop may not be your thing in the first place, but the affecting lyrics, tasteful guitar playing, delicious backing vocals and use of trumpet and flute turn it into a track to be cherished and one of the band's greatest achievements. Almost as good is the title track, with deadpan verses by Phil Daniels (who starred in the movie version of The Who's Quadrophenia) about dirty pigeons and noisy dustmen. From this track, it's only a small step to the metronome-pop of "Tracy Jacks" and "London Loves," songs catchier than is legally tolerated. Perhaps more remarkable than all the other songs on the album are the ballads. While the elegant "Badhead" (again with nice vocal harmonies) and the dreamy, harpsichord-dominated "Clover over Dover" succeed in doing what the band could only hint at on the previous album, it's tracks like "To the End" and "This Is a Low" that are confirmation of the band's gained mastery. "To the End" is obviously inspired by string-laden `60's of the kind that turned Burt Bacharach, Dusty Springfield and Serge Gainsbourg into pop icons. Constantly balancing on the thin line between gracious finesse and syrupy soft-porn pop (blame it on the sexy backing vocals by Stereolab's femme fatale Laetitia Sadier), it comes off wonderfully and it was a great - almost bold - idea to release this as the second single off of the album.

A little less tongue in cheek, but not a lesser track, is the excellent "This Is a Low." Built upon acoustic guitars and less striking imagery, it's a subtle track with a first-class chorus that's bombastic without becoming annoying (in my book) and a great final chapter to an excellent album. Oh, there's still the instrumental "Lot 105" that, like the equally silly "The Debt Collector," is an update of the music hall-tradition, but they don't really add anything to the album (like the "Intermission" and "Commercial Break" on Modern Life), except for another link to the past. All in all, Parklife is an album that nearly lives up to its legendary status. It's not an album that hits you in the gut and it isn't a virtuoso pièce de résistance that leaves you behind baffled either. It has a few songs that go on for too long ("London Loves," "Tracy Jacks"), one that was completely unnecessary ("Far Out") and a few that are basically not that impressive, such as "Magic America" (we've heard that "Lalalala" before, too), "Jubilee" and the instrumentals, but the band proves it has progressed/matured with leaps and bounds. It's not surprising that nowadays this album is regarded as the pinnacle of Brit-pop, or as one of the era's classic touchstones, because it boasts a sprawling diversity that would inspire a legion of imitators and paved the way for other top acts such as Supergrass and Elastica. Even without these consequences, Parklife would stand as an outstanding document of the era.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When the planets aligned to create the greatest British Album, 1 May 2008
This review is from: Parklife (Audio CD)
The arse end of decades of conservative rule which seemed to last longer than the eastern block, economic stability, high employment and the false dawn of new labour conspired to create a time when Britain could celebrate itself. This album covers the lows and highs of this septic isle feeling like a lock in with Martin Amis, Martin Parr, Auden and Ray Davis. Musically brillant subversive singalongs with razor sharp lyrics this is a masterpiece that had the fortune to arrive such a pivitol moment.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant, 31 July 2012
By 
Victor Preston "gvb" (birmingham, west mids United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Parklife (Audio CD)
These blur reissues are brilliant for the price.
A smart box including a double cd in a gatefold mini album sleeve.
An Interesting booklet with full details.
4 Postcards and a free mp3 download with bonus material.
These are the best deluxe editions available.
I would have been happy to pay more for a dvd with the videos and tv shows.
Parklife has always been a favourite, i have got the japanese 'barking dogs' version.
I feel sorry for the fans who have ordered the 21 box set.
They will have to buy all of the albums again.
I would not be surprised to see the Showtime DVD released as a deluxe Blu-Ray in time for Christmas!

Parklife
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Super duper, 30 Sep 2001
By 
Kay Ollerenshaw (High Wycombe, Bucks United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Parklife (Audio CD)
One of blur's best; which means that it is more than your average album. As this is one of blur's earlier albums, so you can expect some funky 80's kinda music inside. This is definitely a landmark in blurs musical history so is of course worth a purchase.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 12 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Parklife (Audio CD)
Bought this as I only had it on cassette tape so don't get to play it as often as I would like, Just a brilliant album.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great album, 8 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Parklife (MP3 Download)
This is hands down the best album I have ever heard from Blur. Every single track is unique and provides a great musical experience. Highly recommended!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars parklife, 7 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Parklife (MP3 Download)
brilliant, takes me back to britpop days and love these songs, if you liked blur would recommend as good cd
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The ultimate album of the mid 90s, 16 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Parklife (Audio CD)
The classic Blur album with loads of classic material including several memorable singles i.e 'Parklife' and 'In the End'. One of the best albums of the 90s mainly because the tracks seem to flow effortlessly together in glorious harmony. A must buy for me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Parklife
Parklife by Blur (Audio CD - 1994)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews