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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On a par with Yoshimi
For anyone who has only gotten into The Flaming Lips since Yoshimi or The Soft Bulletin (like me), you will not be even slightly disappointed by this album - it's every bit as good as either of their two most recent releases. While maybe not quite as polished as the two most recent albums, it's a little more zany and upbeat than the Soft Bulletin, and tracks like Bad Days...
Published on 15 May 2003 by Mr. A. Milne

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3 of 33 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Buy "Hit To Death....."/"Transmissions......" instead
I shall be brief: their other albums are all essential, but this one is a complete waste of time. It is essentially a diluted version of "Transmissions from the Satellite Heart" but without the shiny hooks or spacey fuzziness of that album. I am a huge Lips fan, and it hurts me to say this, but you would be stupid to buy this album, it is the sound of a band who...
Published on 17 May 2001


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On a par with Yoshimi, 15 May 2003
This review is from: Clouds Taste Metallic (Audio CD)
For anyone who has only gotten into The Flaming Lips since Yoshimi or The Soft Bulletin (like me), you will not be even slightly disappointed by this album - it's every bit as good as either of their two most recent releases. While maybe not quite as polished as the two most recent albums, it's a little more zany and upbeat than the Soft Bulletin, and tracks like Bad Days and Evil will Prevail are amongst their very best. Now available for a fiver there is no excuse not to buy it. Do it now. I mean it...
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is the best album in the world., 17 Oct 2003
This review is from: Clouds Taste Metallic (Audio CD)
This was the first Flaming Lips album I bought, and having bought the rest since I must say its still my favourite. To me the beauty of the Flaming Lips music is their inherent hopefullness in the face of a seemingly meaningless state of life we all have found ourselves shaing. While The Soft Bulletin deals with this in a splendor of melancholic lushness, Clouds Taste Mettalic perfectly encapsulates this continuous theme using a knowingly calculated yet almost "accidental musicalness". It takes the energy of the earlier more lo-fi albums, such as Hit To Death... and Transmissions from the Satelite Heart, while being well on the way, in terms of production and song writing to The Soft Bulletin.
Some of this energy seems to come from the guitarist Ronald, who uses his guitar in a truely unique and original way; as an intrument of many sounds rather than a chord producing stringy-box. This album is consistently brilliant. There aren't any bad songs on it, just better ones. Eeeeee.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A band that sounds like no other ...?, 27 Dec 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Clouds Taste Metallic (Audio CD)
For all the hype (albeit deserved) that surrounded the Lips' last release, "The Soft Bulletin", this was their first great record, and remains their highest point so far. Having bought all their albums as they came out, one can clearly feel the evolution running through their records with the two previous works to "Clouds..." being lovable dress-rehearsals for this record.
It's often said, usually falsely, but "Clouds..." really is a record that sounds like no other. Dripping with heart-ache, paranoia, playful self-mocking humour and a large dose of plain weirdness, from start to finish "Clouds..." is one of the few classic albums of the 90's.
While "The Soft Bulletin" had a host of great moments it also lacks the complete soul of this record. "The Soft Bulletin" is a little more refined than "Clouds...", lacking as it does the skuzzy guitar and spine-tingling wild harmonies, but somehow it has less energy. From the gentle accoustic openings of "Braiville" to the amusing cataclysmic thrash of "Guy Who Got A Headache And Accidentally Saves The World", through the album's highpoint, "They Punctured My Yolk" (which comes across as the Beach Boys playing Spiritualized playing Suicide) up to the oddly comforting "Bad Days", the Lips' have created a record that comfortably sits alongside Suede's "Dog Man Star", REM's "Automatic For The People", the Manic's "Holy Bible", any Tindersticks or Low record and Kristin Hersh's "Hips And Makers" as a truly great record of the Second Movement of 20th Century Rock.
If you enjoy "The Soft Bulletin" then you're safe adding this to your CD collection. Ignore the one-star review above. This is as good as it gets.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Twisted pop masterwork from the always brilliant Flaming Lips., 10 Jan 2008
This review is from: Clouds Taste Metallic (Audio CD)
By this stage in their career, The Lips had progressed from the lo-fi psychedelic slacker rock of early albums like Oh My Gawd! and In a Priest Driven Ambulance, into something of a loose pop band. 1991's major label debut, Hit to Death in the Future Head, and it's follow up, 1993's almost successful Transmissions from the Satellite Heart had seen the arrival of producer Dave Fridmann, as well as the on-going bombardment of revolving-door band members - incorporating early input from both Nathan Roberts and Jonathan Donahue - through to the more stable pairing of founding members Wayne Coyne and Michael Ivins, alongside their soon-to-become long-term collaborator Steven Drozd, and the introverted guitar wiz Ronald Jones. This line up would go on to create Transmissions from the Satellite Heart, and this, the twisted pop masterwork that is, Clouds Taste Metallic.

The most astounding thing about the album, for me at least, is the way in which everything just seems to work towards creating a unified whole; from the song titles and the subject matter (obsessions with space travel, science, superheroes, robots, love and death; which would all continue on the more successful albums to follow) to the overall use of instrumentation. Here, Coyne uses the acoustic guitar to flesh out the melody on a number of songs - which gives the album an individuality within the context of their discography - whilst Drozd and Fridmann add keyboards, distortion and all manner of bizarre little instrumental flourishes (including the sculpting of Jones's angular and distorted guitar riffs into a wave of atonal orchestration) to add atmosphere and counter melodies to really compliment the songs in a structural sense. Placebo Headwound, Kim's Watermelon Gun and Lightening Strikes the Postman do the whole surreal pop thing better than The Pixies ever did - with The Lips firing on all creative cylinders - with a great sense of rhythm and percussion, some wonderful production effects and Coyne's little-boy-lost vocals all adding to the overall pop quality of the songs as a whole.

Tracks like When You Smile, Kim's Watermelon Gun and Christmas at the Zoo seem more like children's songs run through the art pop blender, with Coyne singing of innocence and love in a world of uncertainty, as the band keep the whole insane pop vibe spinning to infinity, with Jones making some extraordinary noises with his guitar, Ivins keeping the bass work subtle (and even adding the odd stab of piano) and Drozd offering up some astounding drum fills (the ace rhythm section of Ivins and Drozd really gelling on songs like the aforementioned This Here Giraffe, Psychiatric Explorations of the Fetus with Needles and one of my favourites of favourites, They Punctured My Yolk). Here, Coyne sings about rejection and redemption against the context of an ill-fated space mission, the bizarre descriptions coming close to poetry ("good bye, good bye / look as the clouds burst / they're growing taller / as your ship leaves in the distance / my world gets smaller"). Only Coyne could write a track about spacemen and make it sound like a love song... though given the fact that he's spent the last ten years making a film in his garage called 'Christmas on Mars', he probably means it!! Either way, there's no denying the creative scope of the band at this stage in their career... managing to turn in a record that uses strong melodies alongside forward-thinking instrumentation to tell an outrageous story that really, when distilled to its most simplistic formula, is all about finding love and acceptance within a world of apathy and confusion.

From this point on, the whole album is just a veritable pop Mecca, taking on the notion of a Pet Sounds for amateurs and elaborating on it - as the band set about crafting a collection of teenage symphonies to a junkyard dog (preferably one still floating in space) - whilst all around them the notes and bending and distorting, the vocals are fracturing on the high notes and the whole thing seems in danger of falling apart at any given moment. The fact that it doesn't, the fact that the band end up creating a piece of work that somehow seems more pure and heartfelt than anything Brian Wilson could produce, is a testament to The Lips as a creative unit.

For me, Clouds Taste Metallic is the defining moment for The Flaming Lips thus far. The record in which the mad exploration of the limits of a recording studio merged with something approaching proper song craft, giving way to a purity of vision and an intuitive understanding of what makes great pop. It's a lot less clean and professional sounding than their later pop masterwork The Soft Bulletin, but somehow remains the more enduring of the two. The beguiling beauty of the closing songs, Evil Will Prevail and Bad Days, which somehow finds a middle ground between The Beach Boys and country music - as Coyne strums an acoustic guitar while insisting "all your bad days will end" - is really quite beautiful and rather moving; particularly following the over complicated parade of wild imagery that spiralled out of Coyne's mad, kaleidoscopic songbook, during the preceding twelve tracks. For me, this is one of the few recorded masterworks of the 1990's... the one that no one bothered to buy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Flaming Lips yet again prove why they are one of the great bands of our time!, 4 Aug 2006
This review is from: Clouds Taste Metallic (Audio CD)
The Flaming Lips are band that are always embracing the weird and wonderful side of life and have a great time doing so as well as constantly evolving their off kilter space age rock sound. This album is no expectation to that. The title of this album "Clouds Taste Metallic" should make that apparent.

After a punishing tour schedule to help promote "Transmissions From The Satellite Heart" the band regrouped, and on the September 19, 1995, they released this album " Clouds Taste Metallic".

Clouds Taste Metallic, is a even more accessible album than "Transmissions From The Satellite Heart " yes it may be more a accessible sound however the band have done so without discarding the spacey, trippy and more often than not bonkers lyrics that typify The Flaming Lips.

The album has songs written by the band that no other band in a month of Sundays would ever have even thought about writing. Which is what sets this band apart form other bands. Just one example of a song that has some rather, unusual lyrics

Their wasn't any snow on Christmas eve and I knew what I

Should do, I thought I'd free the animals all locked up at the zoo

That is up their with some of weirdest pieces of inspired crazed genius ideas for a song, a entire song about freeing the animals form the zoo, not because of any cruel deeds that may be going on in their but due to that fact it that their was not going to be any snow on Christmas Eve. No doubt there is a deeper meaning to this song that merely freeing animals in the zoo, but isn't the face value of the song a lot more fun?

This album also continues the tradition of long and mad as brush song titles that the band give their songs, some of these titles are as good, if not as good as the songs themselves.

Psychiatric Exploration Of The Fetus With Needles...

Guy Who Got A Headache And Accidentally Saves The World

Lightning Strikes The Postman

But amid all the cartoonist that band surrounds them selves with on the majority of the songs. There are songs that show that band aren't all about singing about postman who get unfortunately struck down by lighting, or saving the world by getting a headache, there are songs on the album like "Placebo Head wound" which questions the existence of god but done so in the usual Wayne Conye way, simple but profound.

And if god hears all my questions

Well how come there's never an answer?

Is it nothin, nothin?

"Clouds Taste Metallic" takes the sprit of fun that ran through a lot of "Transmission From The Satellite Heart" retains it and builds on it without making a carbon copy of it A great album by one of the most constantly brilliant bands of out time. The Flaming Lips you cant help but love, especially when they make music as enjoyable as this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My dead budgie sent me here, 18 July 2003
By 
Wee Jimmy (Tring, Hertfordshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Clouds Taste Metallic (Audio CD)
Wayne Coyne is a modern legend. The man with the grizzled beard who dances around like a madman, throwing confetti, bursting balloons, singing with glove puppets of nuns, pouring fake blood over himself whilst singing 'happy birthday' to random people, sometimes even on their actual birthdays. He is a mastermind of showmanship, but with music like that from this, The Soft Bulletin, Transmissions From The Satellite Heart and Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots to back him, he becomes transported into a god, backed by thousands of worshippers (some of them wearing fluffy animal costumes).
Clouds Taste Metallic is the finest Flaming Lips work to date, the critics latched onto The Soft Bulletin but those in the know have this at the head of their Lips collection. Here they set about exploring the foetus with a full-on guitar and woozy synth assaul, coupled with lyrics that took the small details and exploded them into huge, glorious vapour trails, whilst retaining the intimacy that makes the Lips sound like they're talking directly to you.
Unfortunately, lightning struck the postman - the sales were nothing like they deserved to be. The full on assault of riffing tracks such as the aforementioned vicious assault on public service providers by natural phenomena beckoned a huge audience of global devotees like that which is beginning to develop now, in the wake of Yoshimi and The Soft Bulletin. Equally, the ballads like They Punctured My Yolk, When You Smile and Evil Will Prevail scratch beneath the psychedelic surface and invite legions of tears to swarm across your eyes.
Catchiest Song Award goes to Brainville, a wonderfully retro evocation of Brian Wilson, but hyperactively happy and uppered up where Wilson could be introspective and paranoid. But everything's good. You can't go wrong with this one.
Viva la revolucion baby!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a kaleidoscope, 20 Oct 2002
By 
Nicholas - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Clouds Taste Metallic (Audio CD)
Ditching much of the rawness of previous works (telepathic surgery, hit to death...) the lips come up witha truely focused album that seems to be a natural predecseeor to the soft bulletin. Though far more guitar based than that excellent album it still shows a marked move towards a more organic sound. Excellent lyrics, excellent effects and indeed an excellent purchase for any lips fan.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Skewed and wonderful, 2 Dec 2000
This review is from: Clouds Taste Metallic (Audio CD)
Working my way back to this from the soft bulletin, I was very pleasantly surprised by this album. The soft bulletin is a fabtastic album, and so is this but the two are very different. Here, the lips are more lo-fi, there are more guitars, there is more crackly noises, but still fantastic song and bizzare yet strangely affecting lyrics.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars They improve yet again, 11 Feb 2003
This review is from: Clouds Taste Metallic (Audio CD)
Most people won't find this review very helpful anyway, but here goes. The Flaming Lips just seem to get better and better with every album, although many argue that 'The Soft Bulletin', released in 1999, is better than 'Yoshimi battles the pink robots', released in 2002. Also, it has often been said (and deservedly so) that the Flaming Lips really don't sound like anyone else. I can't compare this album to any album by any other people. The only other album that bears even a slight resemblance to this one that I can think of is their own 'Transmissions from the satellitte heart'. With this album they developed their sound even further than had previously been done, and as a result, the album doesn't have one bad track on it. True, some songs are better than others, but none of them are truely bad. One good thing about the album is the strangely affective lyrics. 'They punctured my yolk' genuinely makes me feel sad, even though I don't know what the song's about. 'Bad days' is a brilliantly uplifting song, and 'When you smile' is a truely wonderful song, that really does make you smile wide. Better than any of their earlier albums (except perhaps 'Hit to death in the future head'), this is a good place to start with the Flaming Lips.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars i WAS ASTONISHED, 17 Sep 2012
I remember when this came out and was stunned. I do go to gigs and listen to music, and this is so much better that the recent softer stuff, but I guess it takes going commercial to reel all the cowards in, the ones who never got it in the first place.
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