Customer Reviews

26
4.7 out of 5 stars
New York
Format: Audio CDChange
Price:£5.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 1 July 2014
But don't you think Paphides is a terrible writer? Glibly unfunny, with little discernible taste. A Peter Robinson-style scenester with a fnotepad full of zeitgeisty neologisms, but nowt in the way of corpuscles. (Taught 'Ology)
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 1 November 2010
After the great BERLIN, Lou Reed returned to a guitar and bass-based format for NEW YORK, his most accomplished achievement since the days of the Velvet Underground. Moving, intelligent, and often very funny.
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 21 April 2007
How this album receives less than 5 stars from some reviewers is beyond me. But then again, when reading through the 'less-than-5-star'-reviews it becomes obvious that some disagree with the political issues and some even with rock music dealing with current political issues. Well, then... go check out some Offspring then and leave Lou to a more discerning audience ;-)

This album heralded Lou's return to form in 1989 which has so far lasted to this day some 18 years down the line. It's Lou finally hitting the formula again after The Blue Mask in 1982 with a stripped down 4 piece band playing nothing but rock and with lyrics so on the mark that they may leave the victims on the receiving end with a scratch or two... and the rest of us equally belly-laughing and fist-banging in righteous approval.

How this album can receive anything less than 5 stars is indeed a Dime Store Mystery.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 12 March 2015
For me, his best album, though I think only the 1st 4 tracks are great. A candidate for the most boring man on Earth in real life, this sometimes slips over into his music.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 5 October 2014
Good
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15 of 47 people found the following review helpful
on 3 January 2003
If it were not possible to turn a record off after you'd started listening to it, this record would be worth two stars. Had only the first eight songs been included, it would be worth five.
New York starts out so effervescently, it's impossible to credit how badly it loses its way. Lou Reed's overall approach is fantastic - get a bunch of guys in a room, flip the "record" switch, and play - don't even turn the tape off between songs (yes, it's true: New York carries on the honourable tradition of intra-track amplifier buzz).
And for half an hour, this works just fine, because the material is up to it: Romeo Had Juliette - well, the title says it all -is raw, brutal and vital. Dirty Blvd is the same. The socio-political undertone, while undeniably there, is still an undertone: understated enough not to get in the way of the rock 'n' roll. This suits Reed's socio-political ends, too, because while you Get The Point, the music Still Sounds Tough.
For a while. The first sign that everything might be about to go off the rails is There Is No Time. Suddenly Reed's patented, nonchalant chic delivery - you know, the half-spoken drawl - is gone and he literally bellows out the lyrics, which comprise some of the most knuckle-headed sloganeering you're ever likely to hear (Hey, Lou: bonus points for getting the word "circumlocution" into a rock song. Not.) Is Lou being ironic, you wonder? Sure hope so.
But no. After a brief reprieve, the original musical focus is jettisoned completely in favour of dud invective of the sort only "serious" rock musicians of the eighties could issue with a straight face. And there the album remains, dignity gone, to the point where you wish someone would take it out and shoot it, for its own good.
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