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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SUBLIME!!!
What a *terrific* piece of art by SW. The surround mix has been treated with the utmost respect for CTTE and has been put together beautifully. I couldn't have asked for more. Finally, I love the overall presentation of this set right down to the BD menus and visuals which complement the music so well.

I'd love to see 'The Yes Album' and/or 'Relayer' given the...
Published 17 months ago by Keith J. Lambert

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars i agree with Ian The Hare
It hurts to say it as I love Yes and this album is one of their best. I also very much like Steven Wilson although his remixes are a little erratic, sometimes even when working with the same artist. For example I loved LTIA by King Crimson but found Red a little disappointing. Aqualung was superb but TAAB left me cold.I think it all depends on what Steven decides to do...
Published 17 months ago by c p chamberlain


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Close to the edge of perfection, this 40-year old classic is still fresh as a summer morning, 12 Dec. 2012
By 
The Guardian (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Close to the Edge (Audio CD)
Yes' astounding 1972 album is the peak of the band's most creative period, the defining creation of the quintessential Anderson-Squire-Bruford-Howe-Wakeman line-up. The original album contained only the 20-minute title track plus two other pieces of around 10-minutes each: the beautiful `And You and I' and the fast-paced, foot-tapping `Siberian Khatru.'

The title track is a fine example of jazz-rock fusion, symphonic in structure (i.e. 4 `movements' finally returning to the main theme) with a collection of fine melodies, tight and often funky playing through time-switches & key-changes, compositionally outstanding & perfect in execution. It's a masterpiece, the apotheosis of the `prog' genre.

The best way to characterize Jon Anderson's enigmatic lyrics, such an essential part of that distinctive `Yes sound', is as a kind of expressionist art painting bright colours on a big canvas, describing shapes you can never quite define. The lyrics of most pop/rock/jazz music are buy contrast more literal-realist, less imaginative.

A real `feel-good' factor pervades the music of CTTE. It's upbeat, and passages often contain that tinge of humour (musical, not lyrical) sometimes found in the work of accomplished artists entering a more mature period of greater confidence in what they can do. There is no weak link in this chain: all five musicians weave a kind of magic together, each essential to the whole.

The 2003 re-master is exquisite, the original 16-track analogue recordings sharp with an unexpectedly `warm' sound. You get plenty of extra material, all of it good: the single version of `America' (much shorter than the full-on 10-minute version); a single of the `Total Mass Retain' movement from CTTE; a nice alternate `And You and I' & a studio-runthru' of `Siberia', less polished than the album version. Roger Dean's tasteful, simple green-dominant cover-art is nicely reproduced too; the perfect artwork for the music.

If you have heard any of Yes' music - particularly from the band's very productive first 10 years - and never heard CTTE, then give it a listen. With `Dark Side of the Moon' it's probably the finest example of the best of the `prog' genre and like the best of Pink Floyd, it hasn't aged a day in 40 years.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Close, closer.... not closest, 6 Nov. 2008
By 
S. G. Gilman "Simon Gilman" (Stockport) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Close to the Edge (Audio CD)
The reason for the success of 'Close To The Edge', certainly amongst Yes fans, is that conceptually, atmospherically, contemporarily and compositionally the album outstripped everything they (and nearly everyone else) had done hitherto. Smashing the three-minute-pop-song despotism of the music and entertainment industry was a given goal of prog rock, and so instead of fifteen or twenty songs we have only three, the title track first and longest, racking up nearly nineteen minutes of play. Yet, when broken down, it becomes clear that these extended pieces are very clever arrangements-into-movements of, you got it, three-minute pop songs, at least in the sense of verse and chorus structure. Several musical themes are presented in a number of variations, which are often very simple rock and blues ideas like moving one chord shape up and down the fretboard of a guitar, or descending bass lines, or chromatic keyboard chord modulations. Somewhere between recording hours of material and taping together the best bits from the cutting-room floor, the band and engineer Eddie Offord managed to create something almost revolutionary: classical music structure meeting rock music ideas and actually working.

The title track exemplifies this approach perfectly, linking its disparately composed movements with smart explorations of the interchangeability of 3/2, 12/8, 3/4 rhythms, and with reiterations and variations of melodic and harmonic themes. To this is added a range of different guitars, of keyboards (including, almost inevitably, a church organ), of bass sounds, and the whole is carried forward with enough rhythmic momentum for the nineteen minutes to pass without flagging. `And You And I' is more acoustic, with a strongly catchy climbing-the-stairs melody, though the sound palette does occasionally broaden out into the epic. `Siberian Khatru' (whatever THAT means) closes the album, and is the most successful track, with a powerful clarity of arrangement between hypnotic guitar riff and highly melodic bass and keyboard lines, at last letting the band rock out a bit on 4/4s amongst all the clever-clever 7/8s.

For my money, though, this seminal best-attempt-at-prog-rock-ever misses by a fraction. The versions of these three songs on the album `Yessongs', played live while they were still fresh to the band, showcase a far greater potential than this poised, meticulous offering. It's squeaky-clean, as precise and as pared as a voice that is too-in-tune, and its sheer artistry almost alienates. The `Yessongs' versions (with rockier drummer Alan White replacing top-kit wiz Bill Bruford, and a far more wired, electric-guitar-hero approach from Steve Howe) are altogether dirtier and more satisfying.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Close to the Edge" and right on the mark: Yes' best, 25 July 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Close To The Edge (Audio CD)
"Close to the Edge" is the last and best of the three albums Yes produced in 1971-1972, when the Progressive Rock group founded by vocalist Jon Anderson was at its creative peak. Back in the good old days of vinyl, the title track was the entire first side of the album and represented the group's formulaic pattern at its best: a nice long instrumental introduction that leads to the song's main figure which everyone in the band takes turns playing. With Anderson the thing is to always enjoy his soaring tenor voice and forget about the inane lyrics; trying explaining "A seasoned witch could call you from the depths of yoru disgrace/And rearrange your liver to the solid mental grace/And achieve it all with music that came quickly from afar/Then taste the fruit of man recorded losing all against the hour." Compare that with how the "I get up, I get down" from the end of "The Solid Time of Change" works a lot better because what matters are not the words but the sound. Anderson's voice and the falsetto harmonies he creates with Steve Howe and Chris Squire are as much an instrument as Howe's guitar or Rick Wakeman's keyboard. Howe's acoustic guitar work is featured on "And You and I," while "Siberian Khatru" features a nice musical duel between Howe on sitar and Wakeman on harpsichord. The promise evidenced by "The Yes Album," and developed further on "Fragile," reaches full maturity on "Close to the Edge." Listen to those three albums again in order and you will reach the conclusion that this was Yes' best album.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blu-Ray WARNING, 21 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Close To The Edge (Blu-ray Audio)
Love this

However, I've just discovered, despite ordering the Blu-Ray and cover sticker / disc are labelled 'Blu-Ray', that the disc is only a DVD.

Discovered this by accident when I put the 'Blu-Ray' in a DVD player and it read it.
The Yes Album remaster Blu-Ray won't read so...

Full marks to Amazon as they have agreed to replace despite me having had this over 6 months.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect remaster (Blu-Ray), 26 Dec. 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Close To The Edge (Blu-ray Audio)
This was always a wonderful album whatever it's previous guise - Vinyl, CD, or CD (Rhino remaster), but with this latest effort from Steve Wilson, it's even better and the 5.1 mix is awesome.

Many reviewers will articulate the merits of both the album and re-mix far better than I. For me I just wanted to say that this is not just for completists, but is a must buy for any fan of the album - this is without doubt (surely) the definitive version.

The re-mix is sympathetic and improves the original rather than detracting from it and I'm already looking forward to the next of Yes' back catalogue given the treatment by the 5.1 remix guru.

5 stars for the music
5 stars for the re-mix and 5.1 Blu-Ray version
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars After Fragile, 15 Feb. 2007
By 
K. C. Simm "kenart" (Lancashire UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Close to the Edge (Audio CD)
With the possible exception of Fragile this is definitive Yes. Classic line up and there have been many. Excellent production by, are you ready Eddie Offord and exceptional song writing. If you are into multi layered music, (not just Prog, I hate that title). If you enjoy great muscianship, Howe being Howe and Wakeman being Wakeman (extrordinary as usual) and if you have never heard this before, (and if you can ignore a certain pretentiousness in Andersons lyrics, see them as sounds rather than gather any meaning from them, the crystal quality of his voice makes up for that anyway)then buy this spend some time with this and you will wonder what actually you did before this. If you have already heard this, what are you waiting for at this price? See them as sounds, is this man on acid?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Close to spot on, 3 Nov. 2006
By 
A. Miller "allanm" (Cumbria) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Close To The Edge (Audio CD)
The definitive Prog-rock epic. Who could imagine its like today, especially one with such huge mainstream appeal?

Completely nuts at the beginning, the plinky guitar and keyboard motifs skipping over grumbling bass and clattering percussion, interspersed with dead-stop "aaah"s, before a more lyrical theme enters, and things start to make sense. What many miss about Yes is their ability to rock; the sheer solidity of the bass and drum interplay giving an excellent platform for the powerful vocal and musical meanderings - fey they were not (generally). And Siberian Khatru - one of the best intros and riffs in rock, pounding along like a steam train.

Something in the melodies makes the daftest words make sense - "not right away; not right away...." "I get up... I get down" "hold down the window... hold out the morning that comes into view... ". With familiarity, it is hard to imagine anything more appropriate lyrically, rearranged livers, solid mental grace and all - melody, harmony, rhythm and meter matter more than overt meaning in this context.

This was the album that made me fall in love with the possibilities of popular music - head, heart and feet. Then along came punk, and we were supposed to be embarrassed about musicality. Never mind the Bo11ocks, here's Yes.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Isn't Close To The Edge Of Greatness: It's Greatness Defined!, 4 Mar. 2007
By 
Chris G. (London, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Close to the Edge (Audio CD)
It's now 2007, and there's not really anything novel that can be said about 'Close To The Edge', the seminal 1972 album from Yes. Similarly, it's difficult to avoid a gushing, superlative-laden eulogy when reviewing the album.

So, whilst musings on the album may understandably lack originality nowadays, the actual music is still as enchanting, euphoric and fresh as ever. Personally, I'd say that the exhilarating nature of this album is its most startling and enduring aspect. Yes have mastered the art of rousing auspicious emotions, and on CTTE they flaunt their abilities with unrivalled élan. From start to finish, this whole experience is just astonishing!

Okay, so maybe this is another gushing review, but if any album deserves lauding, it's this! Sure, there may `only' be three tracks, but each track, to me, is like a mini-album, exploring a myriad of esoteric musical concepts, drifting the listener in and out of contrasting soundscapes; never stalling, always captivating!

The lyrical concepts here are somewhat impenetrable, and, for some, this may be off-putting, however Yes rightly concentrate all their energy into structuring the perfect aural experience, and the words correlate with the sounds flawlessly, generating a cohesive palette of unparalleled sonic beauty.

Each track presents a stimulating musical voyage, and it's impossible to single one out for special mention, as the essence of each song complements a different mood perfectly. Essentially, therefore, the album is unexpectedly versatile, and warrants a listen anytime, regardless of your contemporary psychological disposition. The music invariably engenders joy, anyway - accordingly, it's a tremendous way to elevate your spirits.

So, to abridge: An album that is as good today as it was in 1972 (if not better). Buy!!
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The definitive Yes album, 24 Mar. 2002
This review is from: Close To The Edge (Audio CD)
I have followed Yes and progressive music for some years now (well 20 to be precise!!!). I still believe that 'Close to the Edge' remains the definitive Yes album, and more importantly, the most significant progressive rock album ever!
The title track is a collection of ideas that have been melded together to create a seamless fusion of jazz and rock that is near perfect and always timeless. The 'classic' line up of band members (Anderson, Squire, Howe, Wakeman and Bruford) were at the time, at the peak of their powers and 'Close to the Edge' was never bettered. Most notably, Squire's bass, Brufords percussion and Howe's guitars work together as one single unit, and cut as sharp (and as deep) as a razor.
'And you and I' remains the most gorgeous of all Yes songs. The quirky Steve Howe, Jon Anderson intro paves the way to some of the most beautiful and haunting (Rick Wakeman's melotron) passages in the history of rock music. Its always been a live favourite an is definately one to make the hairs stand up on the back of your neck.
The last track 'Syberian Khatru' (I still dont know what a 'Khatru' is. Answers on a postcard please..or just e-mail me) is Steve Howe's moment of glory. His guitar passages sweep, swoon and soar (almost) as high as Anderson's voice.
The album may not have the enthusiasm of 'The Yes Album' but it is not as self indugent as 'Fragile'. If your new to Yes, but are familure with prog rock, i urge you to give this a try. If your new to Yes and to Prog i would suggest you start with 90125.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hope for a jaded Idealist, 7 Mar. 2009
By 
John Ferngrove (Hants UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Close to the Edge (Audio CD)
I listen to mostly classical music these days but there are certain intense emotions that I find I can get from no classical sources, and one of those emotions is that which I get from any of the mature Yes albums, and in particular, the very first of the mature Yes albums, Close to the Edge.

I remember the wet and miserable Sunday that I picked up my first vinyl copy of this when I was 15, from London's Petticoat Lane market. For me, this was the day when music went from sepia monotones to full technicolour.

I only have to put this on and I am transported back to a time and a state of mind when I truly believed that mankind was not just redeemable, but actually perfectable, and that the power of Love, with a capital L, would make the world an ever improving place. Does that sound crazy now? Yes it does to me too when I look around me. But, when I put this on, I am guaranteed that, for a little while, the grime will fall from my eyes, my heart will fill with a young man's joy, and I will see the world and humanity with hope and vision again. I know of no other music that has this extraordinary power for me. So, who would begrudge a jaded idealist these precious moments of folly :-?
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