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57 of 60 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BANDS JUST DON'T MAKE ALBUMS LIKE THIS ANY MORE...
Nowadays we all know that "Derek is Eric", but back in late 1970 this wasn't as obvious to many, and so the double-album into which Eric Clapton and his new band had invested so much emotion and effort, which he released pseudonymously under the name Derek and The Dominos, failed to achieve the level of commercial success it deserved; Clapton's wish to refrain from the...
Published on 21 Mar 2011 by Mr. L. F. G. Ballinger

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36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Buyers Beware
This item was bought as gift for my partner and received on release day (Monday 21st), it was sealed and looked to be an ideal gift for a long time Eric Clapton fan who already owns the Layla 20th Anniversary Edition. How disappointing then to open it and find that the box contained no badges, no cover art work print, only two facsimile tickets and torn cardboard slots...
Published on 26 Mar 2011 by KTBabe


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57 of 60 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BANDS JUST DON'T MAKE ALBUMS LIKE THIS ANY MORE..., 21 Mar 2011
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Nowadays we all know that "Derek is Eric", but back in late 1970 this wasn't as obvious to many, and so the double-album into which Eric Clapton and his new band had invested so much emotion and effort, which he released pseudonymously under the name Derek and The Dominos, failed to achieve the level of commercial success it deserved; Clapton's wish to refrain from the spotlight had proved detrimental. Accompanied by keyboardist Bobby Whitlock, bass player Carl Radle, drummer Jim Gordon and guest star Duane Allman on slide guitar, Clapton and the Dominos nonetheless recorded a spectacular set ranging from ferocious blues ('Have You Ever Loved A Woman'), joyous Southern boogie ('Keep On Growing', 'Anyday'), lovelorn romanticism ('I Looked Away', I Am Yours' and, of course, 'Layla'), and some sublime reinterpretations (a sky-scraping cover of Jimi Hendrix's 'Little Wing').

This Deluxe Edition of LAYLA AND OTHER ASSORTED LOVE SONGS is a stunning repackaging of one of the finest moments in Eric Clapton's career. The new remaster, cut from the original British Polydor Records master tapes, sounds great, and serves to bring out the album's atmospheric live-in-the-studio vibe to even stronger effect; it's some improvement upon the previous 1997 issue. Meanwhile the extras on disc two conclusively wrap up the brief history of Derek and The Dominos. We get the band's withdrawn, Phil Spector-produced debut single, backing an up-tempo version of 'Tell The Truth' (re-recorded and extended for the album) with the otherwise unavailable 'Roll It Over', a strident rocker the equal to what would subsequently be recorded for the LAYLA album; a great set played on Johnny Cash's television show, the highlight of which is Cash, Clapton and Carl Perkins performing an exuberant cover of Perkins' 'Matchbox'; and finally the several tracks taped for what was planned as the Dominos' second LP, which was destined never to be finished. Of these numbers, which have been newly mixed for this reissue by their original engineer Andy Johns, the stop-gap riffery of Willie Dixon's 'Evil' and the anthemic 'Got To Get Better In A Little While' are the highlights from these aborted sessions (Bobby Whitlock has laid down new vocal and keyboard tracks for the latter incidentally, though his voice seems unchanged over the last 40 years and it blends in well).

With regards to the packaging, well, all the LAYLA album's original artwork is present and correct (they've got the colour tones of the front cover painting more faithful to the vinyl edition this time around in my opinion; the '97 edition looked much too pale), but aside from containing some worthy recording session information, there is no essay about the band's history and dissolution included, perhaps because the story of the Dominos - involving a repertoire fuelled by Eric Clapton's longing for Patti Harrison, and the the drug-soaked tour which planted the seeds of the band's destruction - has already been etched into rock legend. Arguably, though, the story of this band is right there in the music.

Passionate, powerful and at times incredibly moving, LAYLA AND OTHER ASSORTED LOVE SONGS may still touch a raw nerve with Eric Clapton - the album's lack of success deeply disappointed him, and his involvement in this reissue has apparently been minimal - but it just goes to show that screaming guitars, soul-baring vocals and a little heartache are just the ticket when it comes to producing some incredible rock music.

Bands just don't make records like this any more, and if you're one of those purchasing this album for the first time, then you're in for a treat. While for those of you who have got to know and love this album well over the years, then this stands as its definitve edition and is highly recommended.
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36 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Consummate blues, born out of the pain of unfulfilled love., 4 Mar 2004
By 
Themis-Athena (from somewhere between California and Germany) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs (Audio CD)
"Have you ever loved a woman, so much you're tremblin' in pain, and all the time you know she bears another man's name - but you just love that woman so much, it's a shame and a sin ... and all the time you know she belongs to your very best friend!" If you'd never heard this album's title track, you would swear that "Have You Ever Loved A Woman" was the song that Eric Clapton wrote for Pattie Boyd Harrison; not only do the lyrics of Billy Myles' blues classic fit so perfectly, Clapton positively pours his heart out as he sings them, and his guitar screams with the pain of unrequited love. And even before get to this song, Clapton's own "Bell Bottom Blues" lays bare similar feelings and recalls his infamous heroin ultimatum to Pattie ("Either you come with me or I'll take that"): "Do you wanna see me crawl across the floor to you? Do you wanna hear me beg you to take me back?" And as the man pleads with her, so does his guitar, and you wonder what woman could possibly have resisted such an impassioned plea.
Until of course, almost at the end of the album, you hear "Layla," this record's motto more than a simple title track and, in many respects, its reason for being. Torn by personal insecurity, Clapton used the cover and seeming anonymity of yet another band, and the parable of a medieval Persian love story ("Layla and Majnun" - reportedly, "majnun," in Persian, means madman) to put into music what he couldn’t put into words alone. From its opening riff to its last note the song is pure blues, Clapton audibly on the brink of the madness he sings about, and his guitar wailing, moaning and crying out all that was in his heart: "Layla ... you got me on my knees - Layla ... I'm begging darling, please - Layla ... won't you ease my worry now?"
Sparks must have been flying in the studio while Eric Clapton and Duane Allman, recruited by manager Tom Dowd to add inspiration and take some of the lead guitar weight off Clapton's shoulders, drove each other to ever greater heights, simultaneously feeding off and to each other. Like most of the album, "Layla" was recorded live in the studio, and only a live recording could transmit this feverish outbreak of passion. Merely listening to the song is emotionally exhausting, and you can only imagine what must have gone on in the studio and inside Clapton during its recording. To hear the Allman Brothers' drummer Butch Trucks tell the story (in an interview for "Off the Record"), Duane Allman gave "Layla" its finishing touch when he added the five notes immediately following its signature riff. Yet, Allman is not credited as a writer (if that story is true, though, how much more than those five notes would it have taken I wonder?); only drummer Jim Gordon is, for having written the song's piano closing - which he had to be persuaded to allow to be used.
And while Eric Clapton continued to perform the song unaltered for years after its initial recording, he spontaneously decided to include it in the setlist of his MTV "Unplugged" appearance where, deprived of all its riffs, even its signature beginning toned down to a few simple notes, and Clapton's voice unexpectedly reflective, Layla assumed a different personality although not a word of the lyrics was altered. Yet, just as Eric Clapton's and Pattie Boyd's marriage was over by then, Layla was now less an object of burning desire than somebody the singer thought about - thought back to maybe, or sought a conversation with, possibly cautioning her about the consequences of her actions, or recalling his experiences with her: "What will you do when you get lonely, no one waiting by your side? You've been running, hiding much too long - you know it's just your foolish pride ..." And although Clapton has gone back to performing the song in its "plugged in" version during his 2001 "Reptile" tour, he has confined himself to talking only about its musical values, commenting on the technical difficulties of playing riffs and chords that are virtually opposite to what you are singing in an interview for the tour's official program.
Besides Eric Clapton and late addition Duane Allman, Derek And The Dominos consisted of the musicians "left over" by the breakup of Delaney and Bonnie, with whom Clapton had briefly found shelter after yet another supergroup of his (Blind Faith) had disintegrated way too quickly: Bobby Whitlock, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon. Like virtually all of Eric Clapton's albums, solo as well as with his various bands, this record combines material written by Clapton himself and covers of songs he liked; and of course, there is much more to it than "Layla," "Have You Ever Loved A Woman" and "Bell Bottom Blues." As always, Clapton makes his mark with every song alike, and as always, he needs and has found (or Tom Dowd found for him) a cast of outstanding musicians to work with. Segar/Bronzy's "Key to the Highway" becomes an extended blues jam session as there ever was one, and Jimmie Cox's "Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out" forecasts the feelings which, among other things, later compelled Clapton to establish the Crossroads foundation.
Eric Clapton has said about Derek And The Dominos in the interview for the "Reptile" tour program: "[That] was a band I really liked - and it's almost like I wasn't in that band. It's just a band that I'm a fan of. Sometimes, my own music can be like that. When it's served its purpose to being good music, I don't associate myself with it any more. It's like someone else. It's easy to do those songs then.” Hearing the raging pain of "Layla"'s original recording, you wonder whether this is maybe also the only way for him to perform it now ... at least "plugged in."
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars preferable to the super deluxe edition, 1 April 2011
disappointed with the super deluxe edition that I've returned to Amazon two times(you can read my review), I decided to buy this simple deluxe edition, I must say that in this case, my opinion changed completely, because the packaging is perfect and cd have no scratches or traces of glue;
about the music I must say that the first CD was remastered perfectly, the CD sounds much better than the other released in the mid-90s (and not comparable to the twentieth anniversary edition, as in that case the record was remixed);
the second CD, contains an acoustic version of "Mean Old World" played only by eric duane, the single "roll it over/tell the thruth", 4 songs played at the Johnny Cash show (I particularly liked matchbox) and the 5 songs that should have been finish on the second album never completed (actually had already appeared on the Crossroads box set but in this edition they really sound better)

the only thing I regret is having to give up the DVD that contained the 5.1 mix since it was included only in the super deluxe edition, but I'm sure that UNIVERSAL sooner or later will find a way to sell it individually

highly recommended (this issue!);-)
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36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Buyers Beware, 26 Mar 2011
This item was bought as gift for my partner and received on release day (Monday 21st), it was sealed and looked to be an ideal gift for a long time Eric Clapton fan who already owns the Layla 20th Anniversary Edition. How disappointing then to open it and find that the box contained no badges, no cover art work print, only two facsimile tickets and torn cardboard slots holding badly scratched CDs / DVD and also the DVD stuck with some form of glue to the inner liner, the vinyl albums also appeared to have been extensively handled and not at all what you would expect from a box set of this price.

Looking at the Amazon return policy I established that I couldn't just exchange it for a new one but would be eligible to get a refund. So as not to disappoint my partner I decided to order another one as I felt sure this must have been a rogue box set.

Amazon promptly delivered (Friday 25th) and unfortunately this box seemed to suffer from many of the same faults. DVD stuck firmly in the cardboard slot and when eventually extracted had a glue like substance marking it. Yet again some of the CDs were scratched; it did however contain three facsimile tickets and one "Derek Is Eric" badge" (although the box does state badges). I am pleased to see that Amazon have suspended sales of this item as it appears to be the luck of the draw what is contained inside of it. The only consistent seems to be that the 40th Anniversary hardback book in both boxes was in good condition. Potential buyers might need to bide their time whilst Universal sort out these fundamental problems and decide what actually is included in this box set and more importantly apply quality control of the CDs /DVD/Vinyl contained in it, as at present you could be forgiven for thinking that you had purchased a second hand item.

For the time being I have bought my partner the Layla 40th Anniversary Deluxe set and the quality is fine and the bonus disc superb.

Sadly the two Super Deluxe box sets are heading back to Amazon for a refund.
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30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Quality Control lacking in such an expensive package., 29 Mar 2011
I've long been a Derek & The Dominoes fan and I was really looking forward to receiving the Super Deluxe Edition. I figured I would regret it if I didn't buy it even though it was a very expensive product to purchase.

Like other reviewers here my set had a number of issues with it which I put down to the quality assurance of the package provider, Universal I believe.

The 2 Vinyl albums were scuffed and had finger prints on them.

3 of the 4 CD's had scratch marks. The 5.1 surround sound DVD had glue on it and was unplayable. The sticker on the front of the box had not been placed very well in that it had air bubbles and creases on it. The housing for the five discs was 5 tight narrow slots cut into 2 pieces of card where clearly the glue holding them had not fully dried and as a reviewer stated, taking the discs out and reinserting them will scratch them and they were scratched as I said.

I thought about returning it and asking for a replacement, but then noticed that one of the Amazon reviewers had done that already and the replacement received was just as bad.

So I am seeking a full refund and will not repurchase it unless I can obtain some kind of assurance in due course that the quality control issues have been addressed. I will also be writing to Universal to express my displeasure about the quality control with this package.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars terrible package, 25 Mar 2011
10 stars for the music 0 for the package

I received it this morning, it was sealed, i opened it and i discovered:
- 2 cd (in concert) were missing
- the remaining 3 had dropped and were loose in the box, and they were full of scratches of course
- the badge "derek is eric" was broken, completely crushed
- the book had a big crease on the cover

I don't understand why "UNIVERSALS" box are packaged in a such rough way, given the high price!!! (actually the who live at leeds 40th anniversary was similar)

I'm going to return it to amazon of course and wait for a new one to replace it, even if amazon doesn't have any fault!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars BUYER DEFINATELY BEWARE, 29 Mar 2011
By 
D. C. Langley (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
On the back of all the negative feedback I opened my copy of the Super Deluxe today from it's shrink wrap and found that while the Book, Badge, Tickets and Artwork were ok the music side was not.

Of the 5 CDs. I have two with glue traces on the playing side and a third with a deep scratch on playing surface.

Vinyl - a very bad scuff mark which would clearly give playing issues and I would not even try to play it.

Which means the whole lot is being returned to Amazon for a refund.

I have managed to source a replacement copy from another store in the UK and they kindly checked out the contents in some detail and advised all okay, pity Amazon do not have quality control.Layla And Other Assorted Love Songs (Super Deluxe Edition)
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Head and shoulders above the rest, 15 Dec 2003
This review is from: Layla (Audio CD)
Speaking as one of the world's biggest Eric Clapton fans, saying that this is head and shoulders above the rest of his history is probably a bold statement, but I can't say it any subtler than that. As another reviewer remarked, this is great art borne out of great pain - there's really no better way to say it.
Sure, some of the tracks are a bit dated (Thorn Tree in The Garden, I Am Yours) but the rest are just fantastic. The blues jams (Key to the Highway, Have you ever loved a woman) are just that, showing off incredible musicianship and - more importantly - great musicians playing together and enjoying it thoroughly, complete with appreciative whoops and hollers whenever either EC or Duane Allman has played something particularly tasty.
The original tunes, such as Bell Bottom Blues, and, of course, the immortal Layla, still sound great more than 30 years later, the emotion that has created them clearly apparent.
All in all, as rock album milestones go, it doesn't get much bigger than this. If you're new to Eric Clapton and want to dig a little deeper, this is the place to start.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE great underrated., 23 Aug 2013
By 
Mr. G. Morgan "wes" (Haywards Heath, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs (Audio CD)
Now it is clear that Clapton's great work stretched from the Yardbirds (on 'I Ain't got You', 'Got to Hurry' and a couple of other songs) to 'Derek and The Dominos', little more than eight years. A short GREAT career but at a high pitch of intensity and brilliance. In retrospect I find this the very greatest of his albums: his playing is lyrical and fierce, the twin lead with Duane Allman peerless and the singing a revelation to those remembering his tentative 'Rambling on My Mind' on the groundbreaking 'Bluesbreakers' album. The only time I got really annoyed with the 'Rough Guide to Rock' was when their otherwise estimable critic judged this a curate's egg of a disc. It is not. Two long blues workouts, 'Key to the Highway' and 'Have you Ever Loved a Woman' are exhilarating, 'Bell-Bottom Blues' moving and a terrific song expertly played, 'Anyway' shows Slowhand at his most dextrous, 'Nobody knows you when you're down and out' as good a cover of anything as I have heard. In fact, only 'Thorn Tree' and 'Layla' - yeah, I know- leave me unmoved: I have heard the latter just too many times so I am afflicted by 'Stairway to Heaven Syndrome'; the former is curiously insubstantial in this exalted company. Everything else, everything, is wonderful.
All in all though, I aver this is 'God's finest hour'; in his 'Autobiography', itself a worthwhile purchase, incidentally, E.C. rates the rhythm boys on this as the finest he ever played with and Jim Gordon rock's best ever drummer. One does not have to agree to realise that Eric has a better idea of the worth of this gem of a recording than the public did. It is a piece fully the equal of 'Exile on Main Street', 'Pepper', 'Ladyland' 'Piper at the Gates'...etc., anything you care to name; an essential album in any decent blues-rock collection. (I won't even mention 'Oasis' as the comparison is risible).
To put it another way, BUDDY GUY would've been proud to have made this. Say no more.
BUY IT!!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Layla and other assorted lovesongs: Derek and the Dominoes - Why does love got to be so sad?, 14 May 2012
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Eric Clapton has always recorded his best music in the face of adversity. In his John Mayall and especially n his Cream days it was the adversity of trying to make a mark amongst other talented musicians. In his early solo career it was the adversity of fighting his heroin addiction. Here, in the gap between the break up of Blind Faith and his first solo projects, it is the adversity of a painful love for another man's wife that drives him, mixed in, one feels, with the need to subsume himself into the relative anonymity of a band.

It is a record in which Clapton is really pushed. He has a wealth of emotion to pour out and commit to vinyl, he seems totally inspired. But he is also accompanied by another guitar god Duane Allman, and the resulting duel between the two is exhilarating. The record reaches it's apotheosis with the cathartic Layla at the end, where all of the elements combine to produce a perfect, draining and exhausting finale that has rightly gone down in music history.

This 180 g vinyl reissue is also included in the super deluxe 40th anniversary set. The tracks have been remastered and remixed, and sound quite clear and fresh. Listening to the album on vinyl does increase the dynamic and colour of the music, and I kind of prefer it this way. 4 stars.
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