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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars `A Truant Finds Home'
After the mega success of both "Ten" and "VS" Pearl Jam were in the position to do effectively whatever they wanted and in my opinion that's exactly what they did. Gone is the polished production and in comes the more live sound with a bit more of punkier vibe. Pearl Jam always sounded like a fusion of Led Zeppelin, Hendrix and Husker Du, remove one these and I just don't...
Published on 8 Oct. 2006 by Nobody

versus
10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not pretty.
Vitalogy is a stark and at times troubled represention of a band going through a particuarly dark patch and questioning the notion of success and fame, and becoming increasingly disillusioned with the situation they found themselves in. Pearl Jam tried their best to alienate their listeners, with results that were simply too successfull. It's always unpleasant to see a...
Published on 17 Feb. 2001 by Carey Davies


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 12 Sept. 2006
By 
Kelly L. Hunter "kell2804" (Coventry, U.K) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Vitalogy (Audio CD)
I won't add the same as others have written, most of the songs on here are great tunes, but I have to say the whole album is worth buying just for the song Nothingman. If you like PJ's slower songs this is their ultimate. Eddie's voice is so powerful in Nothingman it has brought me to tears on a few occasions.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An impressive album with lots of great songs but some dudz!, 18 Feb. 2002
This review is from: Vitalogy (Audio CD)
This is an example of an album with some stunningly fantastic rock songs to listen to again. Although I love Pearl Jam, I would have to be honest that I have never had the skill or the time to find out the meaning of Eddie's songs, all of course deep and meaningful. Therefore this review is an appretiation of the sound to the ear rather than the quality and the structure of the lyrics.
"Last Exit" (9/10) and "Spin the Black Circle" (9/10) are a fantastic start to the album. STBC is different, fast and furious and gets you singing and moshin to the song!! di di di di dir..SPIN SPIN!. Get your mates around, get drunk and this will get you high! "Not for you" (7/10) is not as imaginative as the other songs on the album and "Tremer Christ" (7/10) again is lacking a bit of energy.
"Nothingman" (9/10) and "Betterman" (8/10) are very similar songs, both been softer and relaxing. "Whipping" (8/10) is very catching, "Satan's bed", (9/10) written by Stone G is when u gotta get your air guitar out! Very cool lyrics too. "Aye Davanita" (5/10) simply isn't a rock song, which is not bad, but is simply not what you buy a Pearl Jam album for... if you like this song, go to the Assie outback and take a tape recorder!
"Immortality" (7/10) is a peaceful song, but its nice to have a bit of guitar as the final songs in the album do go to alternitive instruments.
My favourite has got to be "Corduroy" (10/10). Its is a stunner, with great instrumentles, vocals, its rockin and has a catchy tune!
There are unfortunatly some pointless tracks. "pry To" (2/10) is a short weard song which in my opinion breaks your rockin mood (which is bad! >:( ), "Bugs" (4/10) makes me chuckle but is still dumb and "Hay Foxymoph...." (0/10) is just sad.
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5.0 out of 5 stars a true gem, 7 Feb. 2008
By 
Ben "ben_ism" (Milford Haven, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Vitalogy (Audio CD)
this album seems to generate a lot of mixed feelings in people. being a child of the grunge generation i bought this on release having been a fan of the band since ten. It says a lot about the state of mind of the band at the time and presents a mish mash of quality ballady type songs along with the most punk orientated stuff they have produced. Its a tender, rocking, moody, spitefull ball of love for all to enjoy.

To my ears it works extremely. Still one of my favourite albums and an album that I still love listening to even after more years than i care to admit.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Their Second Great, 17 May 2011
This review is from: Vitalogy (Audio CD)
After the success of their debut masterpiece, Pearl Jam used more experimenting and less commercial tunes for "Vs." and it didn't always pay off. However, with the feel of punk in their minds, they created a blend of commercial numbers right alongside some extremely strange ones ("Hey, Foxymophandlemama, That's Me") as Pearl Jam try to get the right sound.

It doesn't work perfectly on "Vitalogy" but similar albums would try to reach the same sound in the future, such as Red Hot Chili Peppers' "Californication."
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not pretty., 17 Feb. 2001
By 
Carey Davies (Otley, West Yorkshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Vitalogy (Audio CD)
Vitalogy is a stark and at times troubled represention of a band going through a particuarly dark patch and questioning the notion of success and fame, and becoming increasingly disillusioned with the situation they found themselves in. Pearl Jam tried their best to alienate their listeners, with results that were simply too successfull. It's always unpleasant to see a band take their fans for granted in this manner, and Pearl Jam are no different. After listening through this album, all but the most tolerant of listeners can't help but feel ground down by often pretensious barrage of sonic indulgence. For example, dialogue from a 70's psychology video about schizophrenia is used in the over long final track 'Hey foxymophandlemama that's me', and Eddie Vedder can be heard releasing his supposedly troubled soul on an accordion via 'bugs', the insects of the title supposedly being a metaphor for the media and critics. Do you get the idea?
There aren't many songs on this album that don't attempt to deal with the 'pain and torment' involved with fame and fortune. 'Corduroy' is the material used in the famed jacket that Eddie bought from the salvation army before Pearl Jam were famous for a few dollars, and then, at the height of the 'Grunge' explosion, discovered it in a high street store at a four-figure price. 'Not for you' is Eddie lamenting his fans for interpreting his lyrics as their own, and viewing him as some kind of god. It contains the lyric- "small my table/sits just two/gets so crowded/I can't make room/where did they come from?/Stormed my room/and you dare say it belongs to you." This comes across as Eddie simply being ungrateful and hateful towards his bands loyal fanbase. 'Satans bed' is much the same, with Eddie simply putting too much of his own life and experiences into a song to the extent of alienating the rest of us.
However, this isn't entirely true. Pearl Jam direct their anger outwards in 'Whipping', an anthem for the pro choice movement, and take on the topic of death in the admittedly superb and mournful 'Immortality' and the not-so-superb 'Last Exit'. 'Aye Davanita' is Pearl Jam yet again being self indulgent, so it doesn't count. 'Nothingman' is another gem, but in the liner notes we are reminded of the mood of this album with a tasteful picture of a car crash. 'Betterman' almost seems ironic, sitting so awkwardly with the rest of the songs it seems unreal, sounding as it does like bad U2 crossed with lyrics from a teeny-bopping band.
Another problem with this album is the way in which the band have their musical talents wasted. Not one guitar solo appears on this album, which is a terrible waste. Mike Mcready is surely one of the best rock guitarists of the nineties, so why not take advantage of this fact? Perhaps this was designed to be a nod to the punk ethos, but I am the first to lament absence of musical proficiency.
'Vitalogy', however flawed, represents Pearl Jam's transition from cropped haired grungers to thoughtful and intelligent alternative 'rockers'. Despite what people claim, 'Ten' and 'Vs', however good, were still mainstream and commercial, whereas the three albums after 'Vitalogy' are truly brilliant and non-popular, veering well away from the mainstream, so in the respect 'Vs' is a vital turning point, and all the better for it. Some would say that they miss the early nineties euphoria for Pearl Jam, but others would say that the more mellow and intelligent Pearl Jam of today are the better.
Whatever your taste, one cannot say whether you will like 'Vitalogy' or not. Listen to the sound samples. If you like it, but it. If you don't, don't.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant overall, 11 Nov. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Vitalogy (Audio CD)
I have read many reviews of Vitalogy claiming that it is the worst Pearl Jam album. In my opinion Pearl Jam are yet to release a bad album. Vitalogy has quite a dark and experimental feel. There are some great songs.
The record opens with the excellent 'Last Exit'- why does everyboby criticise that one? 'Spin the black circle' is a punk song which doesn't quite work but is still pretty good. 'Not for you' is a mid tempo, quite angry song with a great instrumental bit in the middle. 'Tremour Christ' is one of the weaker songs on the album. The riff is slightly irritating. 'Nothingman' is a great ballad. 'Whipping' is one of the best rock tunes on the disc. 'Pry,to' is an experimental filler but its short and ok. 'Corduroy' is one of Pearl Jam's best songs, it has a great tune and is sung beautifully by Eddie. 'Bugs' isn't a particularly good filler. 'satan's bed' (by Gossard) is another great rock song. 'Betterman' is a fantastic mid-tempo song and 'aye davanita' represents the best of the expreimental songs. 'Immortality' is a fine ballad. 'stupid mop' is probabaly overlong but not as bad or pointless as some people have said, the intro is quite creepy and the music is ok in places.
In conclusion, theis is a great album, no one who buys this will be disappointed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars classic, 20 Jun. 2013
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This review is from: Vitalogy (Audio CD)
great cd one of the best in pearl jams collection of albums this one is great check out nothingman, betterman there all good
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5.0 out of 5 stars one of the best albums ever, 12 Jun. 2014
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the case was scuff free, it was all rewinded and ready to go, it sounds brilliant, cassettes are the master race of music
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The White Album of the 90s, 2 Nov. 2007
This review is from: Vitalogy (Audio CD)
Back in 1968, The Beatles released their double set called The Beatles, more commonly known as The White Album. Within those original album sleaves were four sides of brilliant and strange music. But there was also filler. Strange music. We're talking Revolution 9, Rocky Racoon, Why Don't We Do It In the Road, and several others.
In 1994, Pearl Jam released Vitalogy. Although different in sound, it was no different in content. On this album we had moments of sheer brilliance. Immortality, Corduary, Nothing Man, Spin the Black Circle, and Better Man really shone out. But we also have some strange cuts on this one. Privacy, Bugs, Aye Davinita, and Stupid Mop (listed as Hey Foxymophandlemama, That's Me on the back of the booklet). Then there were mediocra songs also.

This album has some brilliant moments. But it is, as Rolling Stone said, a wildely uneven and chaotic record. I grew up on Pearl Jam, my brother spinning Ten (and later vs.) into oblivion on his CD player as we went to private Christian school. Some of these songs on here are just unfit. pry, to is absoluetely stupid (if you play it backwards get Pete Townsend Saved My Life). Stupid Mop, clocking in at over seven minutes long, is a good 6 minutes and 15 seconds to long.

Sorry, the White Album is better. All the filler on that one had a purpose. And even the filler was listenable, and was cool. Plus, it was a double set. Not only that, it was The Beatles. And I can actually dig Revolution #9. Try as I might, I can't do that with Stupid Mop. Interesting lyrics though. Should have been released as an oddity track on some obscure single. Both are good, but The White Album is five stars. One thing about this is it didn't inspire any cult leaders/serial killers like its prentecessor did. But when its brilliant, its brilliant.

Originally issued January 13, 2000 on Amazon.com
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The White Album of the 1990s, 17 Oct. 2007
This review is from: Vitalogy [VINYL] (Vinyl)
Back in 1968, The Beatles released their double set called The Beatles, more commonly known as The White Album. Within those original album sleaves were four sides of brilliant and strange music. But there was also filler. Strange music. We're talking Revolution 9, Rocky Racoon, Why Don't We Do It In the Road, and several others.

In 1994, Pearl Jam released Vitalogy. Although different in sound, it was no different in content. On this album we had moments of sheer brilliance. Immortality, Corduary, Nothing Man, Spin the Black Circle, and Better Man really shone out. But we also have some strange cuts on this one. Privacy, Bugs, Aye Davinita, and Stupid Mop (listed as Hey Foxymophandlemama, That's Me on the back of the booklet). Then there were mediocra songs also.

This album has some brilliant moments. But it is, as Rolling Stone said, a wildely uneven and chaotic record. I grew up on Pearl Jam, my brother spinning Ten (and later vs.) into oblivion on his CD player as we went to private Christian school. Some of these songs on here are just unfit. pry, to is absoluetely stupid (if you play it backwards get Pete Townsend Saved My Life). Stupid Mop, clocking in at over seven minutes long, is a good 6 minutes and 15 seconds to long.

Sorry, the White Album is better. All the filler on that one had a purpose. And even the filler was listenable, and was cool. Plus, it was a double set. Not only that, it was The Beatles. And I can actually dig Revolution #9. Try as I might, I can't do that with Stupid Mop. Interesting lyrics though. Should have been released as an oddity track on some obscure single. Both are good, but The White Album is five stars. One thing about this is it didn't inspire any cult leaders/serial killers like its prentecessor did. But when its brilliant, its brilliant.

Originally issued on Amazon.com January 13, 2000
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Vitalogy
Vitalogy by Pearl Jam (Audio CD - 1994)
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