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43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just keep coming back to this one...
This is one of those CD's that seems to find its way into my CD player at least once a month - and I've owned it for many many years.
This is a concept album in that all of the songs within contribute to a single unified vision: that of a late-80's anti-Thatcher, ludditic, and apocolyptic tale stemming from an actual 1984 news story in which a Welsh taxi driver was...
Published on 16 Feb. 2004 by r_m_w

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Barmy......bonkers.....but.........
This record is so flawed (awful 80s' production, patronizing tone, bonkers plotline and RW's silly pseudo-Atlantic drawl) , and has been so much maligned, that it's easy to overlook the fact that it was actually addressing some quite serious issues about the nature of community and 'home' (its original title interestingly enough). Very pertinent then in the midst of 1980s...
Published on 11 April 2011 by Nicholas B. Gibbs


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43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just keep coming back to this one..., 16 Feb. 2004
This review is from: Radio K.A.O.S. (Audio CD)
This is one of those CD's that seems to find its way into my CD player at least once a month - and I've owned it for many many years.
This is a concept album in that all of the songs within contribute to a single unified vision: that of a late-80's anti-Thatcher, ludditic, and apocolyptic tale stemming from an actual 1984 news story in which a Welsh taxi driver was killed by a concrete block dropped from an overpass by striking coal miners.
In Radio Kaos, this story is told from the perspective of Billy, a wheelchair bound young adult whose twin brother, Benny, is mistakenly arrested and sent to jail for the concrete block incident. Billy, however, has an astounding ability - he can hear radio waves in his head. He is subsequently sent to live with his uncle and learns to communicate using his radio-wave enabled mind and a cellphone. Using his new-found "voice" he befriends an LA based DJ and they converse. It's these converstations that lead to Billies final oeuvre: a faked nuclear apocolypse (a la "War Games"). When the hour of destruction passes and the world realises that there was no nuclear war, a new "tide" of understanding turns in which - we are left to presume - the great nations lay down arms, learn to harness the power of technology, stop hunting whales, and so on and so on...
Listening to this CD in 2004, the story seems far less relevant. We have seemingly escaped The Bomb, the miners strike is over, Thatcher-Reagan are now distant memories, and Britain is a wealthier place. However, for a thirtysomething like myself, this album survives as a snapshot of the world that was mid-late 1980s Britain. Indeed, listening to the first half of the album, I am transported back to my teenage years; flashbacks of the miners strike, Margaret Thatcher, and concrete blocks come easily.
The album sounds late-80's without being Pop-ish. You can hear the immense experience that is brought to bear in the production; vocals are haunting, the rhythm section is tight, and - as we would expect - all of the Floydish voiceovers and special effects are there.
I suspect that the modern young listener may not connect with this album as the themes and style may seem outdated and irrelevant. However, to those of us who lived through the late 80's this is a piece of work that, thanks to some good writing and great production, remains eminently listenable.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Underrated., 30 Mar. 2006
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This review is from: Radio K.A.O.S. (Audio CD)
Roger Waters' solo work has never had the ubiquity that his Pink Floyd albums have. You can often see why; his political ranting and pretention reaching an often intolerable on a regular basis, it was unlikely to win many new fans looking for another Dark Side Of The Moon. However, his solo albums - particularly Radio KAOS, even forsaken by its creator in recent years - remain underrated.
It is - as usual - a concept album, and an odd one at that. A crippled, disabled Welsh youth moves to LA and discovers he can hear computers in his head. Figuring out how to control them, he creates an imitation apocalypse, before revealing his little joke to the world. Confusing and bemusing, it's not exactly pop music.
However, a lot of the songs on this album are brilliant. 'The Powers That Be,' featuring the glorious voice of Paul Carrack, is one of the best moments as he duels with the backing singers. 'Who Needs Information?' has a divine bridge melody, and the euphoric rush of opener 'Radio Waves,' eighties-sounding though it is, is only equalled by closer (and possibly defining moment of his solo career) 'The Tide Is Turning (After Live Aid).' Ironically enough he was apparently forced into writing this song to give the album a happy ending.
All in all, while the production doesn't really suit the album and the concept's pretty bizarre, this underrated LP is one which Floydians should certainly give a look after exhausting the Pink Floyd back catalogue.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Barmy......bonkers.....but........., 11 April 2011
By 
Nicholas B. Gibbs "Nick Gibbs" (Brussels, Belgium) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Radio K.A.O.S. (Audio CD)
This record is so flawed (awful 80s' production, patronizing tone, bonkers plotline and RW's silly pseudo-Atlantic drawl) , and has been so much maligned, that it's easy to overlook the fact that it was actually addressing some quite serious issues about the nature of community and 'home' (its original title interestingly enough). Very pertinent then in the midst of 1980s Thatcher's Britain, and as much so now (still) in the wake of it. At times silly - yes, overblown - undoubtedly, but actually quite articulate, thoughtful and intelligent. Not three adjectives you usually reach for when describing rock music, which is why RW is held in such esteem by so many people. And The Tide is Turning is still very moving.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars [11/22]... I almost agree with Roger !, 24 Mar. 2015
This review is from: Radio K.A.O.S. (Audio CD)
[11]...Radio KAOS is Roger Waters second solo album, yet his first solo project since he left Pink Floyd in December 1985.

The concept follows a character called 'Billy'...a mentally & physically disabled man from Wales, who is forced to live with his uncle David in Los Angeles after his brother 'Benny' was sent to prison after protesting against the government due to losing his job as a miner due to market forces. 'Radio KAOS' is a fictitious Radio station created in Billy's mind....It is all based around the late 1980's politics, monetarism & society....

The Radio KAOS tour started in mid August 1987, & although it was proposed to go worldwide, the tour went heavily into debt with Roger using his own money at one point.....It ended 3 months later in November.

..His usual imagination & lyrical mastery is not apparent here on most of radio KAOS, unlike all of his previous protest albums, this one is unconvincing, it's just too blatant. with it's poppy tunes & lack of the usual strong lead guitar...Three worthy stand out tracks for me are 'Home', 'Four Minutes' & 'The Tide is turning'...

Even Roger himself has gone down on record as saying he felt a moral disappointment with this album, even going as far as saying he regrets recording Radio KAOS................I almost agree with Roger!, except it's not all bad....
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Completely barking mad, but strangely addictive, 28 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Radio K.A.O.S. (Audio CD)
RW had obviously gone somewhat creatively loopy at this stage - just where do you get the idea for basing an album on a Taffy Hawkings character who controls radio waves using some Bacofoil? Having said that, there are some corkers on this album. Am listening to Home as I write this and it is a beautiful piece; Who Needs Information kicks as well. There are some cringe-inducing moments too, I admit, e.g. mixing Live Aid, Stallone, and a Welsh male voice choir, but overall this is, as I say, strangely addictive. The Wembley gig was bizarre, too, but a lot more enjoyable than the libraryesque atmosphere of the Pros and Cons gig at Earl's Court (half-full, if memory serves me).

Don't buy this album if you're a casual Waters fan (if that's not an oxymoron) as this one's for those of us too far in to get out now. By the way, £85 for the O2 - you need a mortgage advisor to afford gigs these days. That's worth one star, not this box of frogs.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Dated but still a worthwhile listen, 8 Jan. 2014
This review is from: Radio K.A.O.S. (Audio CD)
Though the world it addresses now seems even longer ago than 1987, when Radio KAOS was released, and the concept behind the album was always frankly bonkers, this album remains, in large part, a worthwhile and rewarding listen. The sixth track in particular, Home, has remained a personal favourite through the years.

The reason the album still stands up 27 years on is the wonderful playing, singing and production. There are some top-notch people featured here; Andy Fairweather-Low, Mel Collins and Clare Torrey, to pick just three. If the concept behind the album, where short-wave radio is used by Billy, a disabled Welsh chap, to communicate with radio stations around the world and ultimately avert nuclear Armageddon (I know, I know ... even as I write this it sounds so far left-field that it's in danger of falling off the edge) has been made outdated by the end of the cold war, the rise of the internet and world-wide web and much else, most of the songs can still stand up individually. The production of the album is top-notch, with backing singers (including a male voice choir), horns, guitar and synths (which have a very period, late 1980's sound) blended together perfectly with the lead vocal and various other voices, including a radio announcer and other people who seems to have a strange problem with fish. All of this helps make most of the album stand up still. The bits of it that despite all this don't work for me now are the last two tracks, which I generally skip but you should listen to them and make your own mind up. And you should listen; it's a slow burner that may call you back many times through the years. And even if you don't like it, it'll make you think.

If you're interested in the themes explored in the album, there's a good entry in Wikipedia ([...] ) which gives more details.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Luv it!, 5 Jun. 2012
By 
D. Chandler "Darts Fanatic" (Merseyside, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Radio K.A.O.S. (Audio CD)
One of my favourite albums. Absolutely love it. Not to everyone's taste though probably. Better than The Pros and Cons Of Hitchhiking which I don't really like.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars THE NAME OF THE TAXI DRIVER..., 21 Aug. 2005
This review is from: Radio K.A.O.S. (Audio CD)
The name of the taxi driver killed by a 46lb concrete block and a 65lb concrete post that Roger Waters sings about was DAVID WILKIE.
At the time he was a father of three with a fourth baby born soon after his death. Killed by two 21yr old men trying to stop him from taking a local miner to work during the bitter Miners Strike of 1984-5. The 2 men were sentenced to Life imprisonment but on appeal only served 5 years.
However fascile our endearing you find Radio KAOS, I defy anyone to condemn Waters' knack for confronting hard and uncomfortable storylines leaving the listener with a more enlightened view on the subject.
I remember owning this on vinyl and playing it regularly. Although I feel in some areas it doesn't have a patch against some of Floyd's work, I believe it's sublime and unequalled in others.
6/10
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Radio Kaos- Roger Waters, 17 April 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Radio Kaos (Audio CD)
RADIO KAOS, not one of my favourite albums but still worth listening to, if you've not heard it already. Concentrated around a story about a cripple who can communicate through radio-waves Waters filters his disdain at a host of political issues through the passages of the music. Complimentary to this, there are various references to the narrative, to the albums character Billy, and Billy's communications with a subversive radio station, called KAOS. Billy, lacks the same depth as Pink did in The Wall Video, and the album seems somewhat 80's influenced. Yet, this is still a good album, with The Tide is Turning a gem in comparison to some of the other material. I believe Roger even used his own two children on this album, for texture in one of the songs. (background sounds) Dedicated 'to all those who find themselves at the violent end of monetarism', I would say this is a reasonable album with the occasional hint that it could have been far better, and would still recommend it despite its lack of flair that his other albums contain. For other RW albums, check out Amazon. (see also the When the Wind Blows soundtrack which contains music by Waters with the Bleeding Heart band and other artists)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good cd, 2 Mar. 2013
By 
C. Manning "mud man" (devon,uk) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Radio K.A.O.S. (Audio CD)
I admire all R W,s work and this one is no exception ,but i had to listen to it several times before i understood the whole cd .
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