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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nefertiti - Worth the wait., 17 Dec 2007
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Mr. D. STURT "sturtjazz" (West Sussex, U.K.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Nefertiti, the Beautiful One Has Come (Audio CD)
This is not easy music to listen to, even if you're familiar with Mr. Taylor's very individual music. The recording quality is not stunning (especially Sunny Murray's work) and the piano has seen better days, but don't let this put you off. After a few playings it all seems to drop into place and the beauty and intensity of the work really come through.
The Revenant Double CD issue has 6 tracks shown on each, however on both cd's track 5 is 1minute and 2seconds of silence : perhaps someone out there can advise what the purpose of this is - would like to know.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars About those mysterious bonus tracks ..., 26 Dec 2010
This review is from: Nefertiti, the Beautiful One Has Come (Audio CD)
There is no accompanying booklet with this 2-CD set, and the information on the box makes no reference to the existence of bonus items. Presumably, this is for legal reasons!

The printed track list gives the impression that CD1 contains just the four titles that originally made up the LP "Live at the Cafe Montmartre", and CD2 the four tracks from a second LP that was issued from the same 1962 Copenhagen gig, "Nefertiti, the beautiful one has come."

However, as mentioned in the previous review, each CD has a fifth track consisting of a minute's silence, followed by a bonus track - from the same run, to judge by the similarly less than ideal recording quality and rather out-of-tune piano.

The sixth track on CD1, lasting 6:36, is easily recognised as an alternative version of "Call" - saxophonist Jimmy Lyons plays the same opening phrase. The 20:08 item on CD2 shares just enough basic material to be identified as an alternative version of "D Trad That's What" - but nearly all of the specific musical content is substantially different from the LP version on CD1. These bonus items seem to be in mono, by the way, unlike the previously issued tracks.

Despite the inferior instrument Taylor was obliged to play, and the sub-standard (though acceptable) recorded sound, this set is an essential acquisition. The pianist is as exhilaratingly, exhaustingly inventive as ever, and both Lyons and drummer Sunny Murray are sympathetic interpreters of his particular concept of Jazz.

Superficially, Taylor's idiom may seem fragmented and anarchic, and especially in the late 60s intimidatingly ferocious much of the time; but paradoxically, miraculously he fashions out of this idiom some of the most brilliantly logical, organic and ecstatic improvised music in the whole of Jazz.

Although the greatest Taylor releases tend to be those where he's playing a top quality grand piano, unaccompanied, with optimum recorded sound, an aficionado of his music must not only catch every live appearance possible, but also hear - if necessary, own copies of - all of his CDs and DVDs: from the mid-50s to the present day, there is no such thing as a negligible Cecil Taylor performance.
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