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Live At Ludlow Garage 1970
Format: Audio CDChange
Price:£15.33+Free shipping with Amazon Prime

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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on 5 November 2001
OK, suppose you own a copy of "Live at the Fillmore East" already, and you want to hear some of the best blues & soul inspired rock with just a pinch of psychedelics. Then this is one album you must own. The album start off with Greg's first contribution to the band the psychedelic ballad Dreams. Only to be followed by Duane's trademark slide licks in the traditional Statesboro Blues, this is a unique version of the song in which Duane pushes both the bands and the songs to their limits. On to a smoking version of Muddy Waters Trouble No More and John Lee Hookers Dimples. Every Hungry Woman is a disturbing ferocious Allman Brother original. The blues ballad I'm Gonna Move To The Outskirts Of Town, an old Ray Charles song, can only be found on this album; the band would on their "Bothers and Sisters" album redo this song, but by that time it would have changed so much they renamed it Come and Go Blues. Hootchie Coochie Man is another Muddy Waters classic rearranged to emphasise Allman Bother trademark twin guitars. The second CD is something of a treat it contains a 44 minute version of the Mountain Jam, an band favourite build around the theme from Dovovan's First There Is A Mountain. Forget the "Eat a Peach" version this is the real deal, raw, uncut and unrestrained. Sure these aren't the best versions of the individual songs but when combined in this set, and with the sleeve notes in the booklet this album is a prime example of what the Allman Brothers sounded like before Duane and Berry died, and the band really hit the big times with the acclaimed "Brothers and Sisters" Album.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
I often think that live concert recordings serve two purposes. Firstly as a memento of the show we experienced if we were fortunate enough to be there. Second as a means of communicating to those who were not able to be in attendance a real feeling of the sensation that would have been your privilege to witness had you been one of the lucky few. As I was still in nappies at the time, I would probably have bawled my head off, but today I would give a kings ransom (maybe a ticket to the World Cup final with England already a known finalist) to be there.
Other than a band like the Grateful Dead who cared so much about the quality of their live shows, most performers strive to achieve a comparable sound to that of their studio recordings. Indeed I am sure that the fans of people like B. Spears expect nothing less than to hear their idol perform the songs in exactly the same way as they were meant to be heard on the record. Then there is real music by real musicians ... bands like the Allmans for whom the live performance is the crucial part of their musicianship, jamming, improvising trying to play out their very souls ... heart on sleeve always ... and in doing so bringing the audience on board and carrying them to ecstasy.
Having said that there are recording glitches aplenty with live recordings and the sound may be less than perfect but what shines through, loud and clear, is the sheer quality playing throughout this performance. This is captured here in the equivalent of a home movie of an awesome band. The tracks may have been heard in different versions before but what is important is what happened on that night and how it came across to the audience.
The quality of the recording is not as good as the Fillmore but you know what, this is exquisite testimony to a band that shows that they could go out, night after night and continually deliver such high quality playing and colossal soulfullness in their live music.
WOW
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 4 September 2013
I only got into the ABB (Duane Allman version) about a year ago and with only 2 and a bit studio albums to go at you gotta turn to the live stuff. i'm not always a big fan of live albums (dodgy versions of much-loved songs, overlong drum solos, stuff thats great when you're there aint so great at home stuff etc y'know, audience participation)... anyhow, I bought this cos I wanted to hear more Duane Allman stuff that wasnt on all the other live albums: Dimples, Dreams, I'm gonna move to the outskirts... They just don't let you down. This band is awesome. I have the Fillmore East, and A&R Studios 26/08/1970 (for me, the latter the better of the two) live albums and this needs to be alongside them. I worried from previous reviews that the sound might be duff (drums not right etc) but there isn't any funny stuff here... it just has that primitive, blues/rock sound of 1970 and it just generates that atmosphere.
I really do recommend this album. now to check out the Atlanta one!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Double CD and double case with good booklet the omens are good from the start - and the music is quite excellent! Dating from 11th April 1970 this is the earliest live performance on CD that I know off from the Ludlow Garage Cincinatti Ohio. This was a favourite venue of the bands and they even gave a free concert to keep it in operation, however the lack of a drinks license scuppered it.
The music on CD 1 is excellent as usual, 8 tracks, 47 minutes. This is the only place where you can hear "Dimples" (old Animals favourite) with Duane singing (apart from Anthology 2). The sound is goodish with the performance storming through. CD 2 is 44 minutes of only one track: Mountain Jam, aka There is a Mountain. This is not only the longest version but possibly the best, they go to places that other bands only dream off.
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Dickey's amp hums a bit. And Duane sings on Dimples. Shame they cut "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" off it.
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