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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A lot of good stuff
After just three years without a new Stones release, "Steel Wheels" was hailed as a comeback. But after that, it took the Stones five years to come up with "Voodoo Lounge".
So is it a better record than its predecessor?
Well, perhaps not..."Steel Wheels" was actually pretty good.
But "Voodoo Lounge" could have been better, it is just too long. In the "old...
Published on 1 Oct. 2003 by Docendo Discimus

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Stones Craft A Competent Sounding Yet Insubstantial Offering
Unfortunately by the mid-nineties a Stones album release was designed as more of a way of advertising their current tour than a creative venture in its own right. The tour logo cover of 'Voodoo Lounge' speaks volumes.

'Voodoo Lounge' isn't as slickly produced as their previous album 'Steel Wheels' although it's still highly professional sounding.

The...
Published on 5 Oct. 2006 by Jervis


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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A lot of good stuff, 1 Oct. 2003
By 
Docendo Discimus (Vita scholae) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Voodoo Lounge (Audio CD)
After just three years without a new Stones release, "Steel Wheels" was hailed as a comeback. But after that, it took the Stones five years to come up with "Voodoo Lounge".
So is it a better record than its predecessor?
Well, perhaps not..."Steel Wheels" was actually pretty good.
But "Voodoo Lounge" could have been better, it is just too long. In the "old days" it would have been a double LP, and it seems that many artists feel that with the longer playing time of the compact disc, they have to come up with more material.
If the Stones had cut five songs and put out a lean, mean ten-track CD instead, "Voodoo Lounge" would have felt like a much stronger album, but forgettable mediocrities like "Baby Break It Down" and "Suck On The Jugular" drag it down a little.
That's not to say that it doesn't have its share of excellent songs, however. "You Got Me Rocking" is one of the best, toughest rockers the Stones have done for many long years, all raw electric guitars and thundering drums, and a great lead vocal from Mick Jagger.
The opening song, the grinding "Love Is Strong", is great as well; Jagger plays some excellent, bluesy harmonica, and new bassist Darryl Jones contributes a deep, rumbling bass line.
Other highlights include the lean, up-tempo hard rock of the sleazy "Sparks Will Fly", the slow, acoustic "The Worst" (sung in a hoarse whisper by Keith Richards), the lovely ballads "Out Of Tears" and "Sweethearts Together", and the funky, swaggering blues-rocker "Brand New Car".
And fans of the "Sopranos" TV series will probably recognize Keith Richards' quietly menacing "Thru And Thru" as well.
The band recorded Charlie Watt's drum parts in a stairwell, resulting in the biggest, most powerful drum sound since Kiss' monstrous "I Love It Loud", and the neo-classicist production by Don Was is simply excellent, clear and uncluttered.
One of the Stones' best albums of the 80s and 90s for sure, perhaps even the best.
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41 of 50 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Stones at their absolute peak, 28 May 2010
By 
D. Lowbrow (Bohemian Riviera) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Voodoo Lounge (Audio CD)
Dismissed by critics on its release as a shabby excuse for another greatest hits tour, 'Voodoo Lounge' now stands acclaimed by many as the Rolling Stones' defining masterpiece. Ending the dazzling run of classics initiated with 'Undercover' in 1983, 'Voodoo Lounge' is the crowning glory of the Stones' oeuvre, a magisterial summation of their roots and conclusive proof - if proof were needed - that the last two decades of the twentieth century belonged to the Rolling Stones.

What's truly amazing, however, is that the band managed to make a record at all. The mid-nineties were a difficult time for the Rolling Stones. While property values had held steady, the band's stock portfolios had suffered from the uncertainty surrounding the First Gulf War. Meanwhile, Mick Jagger was becoming increasingly detached from the band, agonizing over whether to send his granddaughters to Cheltenham Ladies' College and whether to renew his Conservative Party membership. As for Keith Richards, he was barely coherent, having been badly incapacitated by a fall from his library ladder in a hotheaded attempt to retrieve a first edition of 'Middlemarch'. And as if that weren't enough, Ronnie Wood was still struggling with his guitar lessons, while Charlie Watts had just been diagnosed with clinical boredom.

The legendary 'Voodoo' sessions are enveloped in such a haze of myth, romance and prurient innuendo that it's hard to separate fact from fiction. What seems clear is that in September 1993 the Stones and their entourage of back-up musicians, hangers-on, personal trainers and financial advisors began to gather at Woods's house in rural Ireland to begin cutting tracks for a new album. There seems to have been little structure to the sessions, which took place in the gritty basement of Woods's palatial dwelling. By all accounts, chaos prevailed. Woods and Richards would regularly sleep through their alarms and show up a good fifteen minutes after the nine o'clock start time. The producer Don Was recalls a notorious incident in which Richards and his driver stopped for a soy latte on the way to the house, throwing the whole morning into chaos. I was far too young to have been on the scene that magical autumn - I was barely 24 - but I often daydream about hanging with the Stones in late 1993. Chances are that if you care about rock 'n' roll and its ability to change the world, you do too.

As autumn turned to winter, the band's accountants and valets began to drift away from the house. What is more, the band found itself in trouble with the local constabulary after Watts failed to indicate during a right-hand turn. With the prospect of a police raid ever more likely, the band shifted their gear to Windmill Lane Studios in Dublin. Now, faced with an enormous mass of unfinished material, Jagger took control of the sessions, overlaying the gritty Richards-inspired basement material with a glorious sheen of studio wizardry. The result is there for all posterity. Not only does 'Voodoo Lounge' boast some of the richest melodic invention in the Western canon, but it also features some of the finest verse since Petrarch. "I go wild," Jagger sings in 'I Go Wild', "when you're in my face; I go wild when I taste your taste". 'Brand New Car' is ostensibly about a brand new car. But there's more than a suspicion that the song is meant to be understood allegorically. Let's assume, for argument's sake, that Mick's not really singing about his latest Jag; let's assume that his new 'car' is of the ... female persuasion: "Jack her up, baby, go on, open the hood: I want to check if her oil smells good. Mmm, smells like caviar". Get it? It's not PC, people, but it's dreadfully rock 'n' roll!

When 'Voodoo Lounge' was released in July 1994, the critics didn't get it. "Not particularly good", said some. "OK, but a bit boring", said others. But 'Voodoo Lounge' stands today as the greatest work of the band's 80s and 90s zenith, eclipsing even the giddy heights achieved on 'Undercover', 'Dirty Work' and 'Steel Wheels'. Sadly, however, the immortal 'Voodoo' sessions took their toll on the band. As Jagger became increasingly active in his local Tory party branch and Richards sank deeper into his obsession with the novels of George Eliot, the Stones began to lose their edge. Their albums, like the brilliant but complacent 'Bridges to Babylon', began increasingly to sound like excuses to embark on money-spinning world tours, in which the band plays umpteenth renditions of 'Too Much Blood', 'Winning Ugly', 'Continental Drift', 'Sweethearts Together' and other standards to stadiums full of adoring fans who were barely out of law school when 'Harlem Shuffle' was in the charts. But as 'Voodoo Lounge' proves once and for all, the Stones have paid their dues. Let's forget about the mythology and the nostalgia, and let's focus on the music, which will stand for all time. Bung it in your cart today.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of their best since their heyday!, 20 Mar. 2008
By 
King of pain (Hereford, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Voodoo Lounge (Audio CD)
I was 17 back in 1995, and the voodoo lounge tour at 'the old' Wembley was the first BIG GIG I had ever attented. My brother 5 yrs my seniour had got 2 tickets to see a band, I thought were ok but had certainly had their time in the sun and were much more yesterday than today (mid-nineties at that moment!) Then, on the barrier, just to the right of the mic(Keith side)I was completley blown away!it changed my life. I liked music but this made me love it! LIVE music captured my soul, my imagination, my life! I suddenly understood the Stones,the sixties/seventies the whole rock & roll thing! Sorry went on abit there?!?
To get back to this album, I became a stones fan in reverse really buying this before the others. And although some of their past works are great, in recent times I feel this album has been over looked (don't forget it won Grammys) It definately there best modern album evereything 10 yrs before or after it, is not as good. Out of tears is as beutiful as Wild horses or Angie. At the prices on Amazon, you won't be dissapointed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good,could have been great, 15 Jan. 2015
This review is from: Voodoo Lounge (Audio CD)
A hotchpotch

Had it been limited to say the best 10 tracks, a winner,but too many obvious fillers

Far superior to anything from them since

Far far superior to the 80's Dirty Work or Undercover

Standout track for me is the superb Out of Tears
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Stones' best album for years, 20 Sept. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Voodoo Lounge (Audio CD)
This album contains everything that had been missing from Stones albums for years. Steel Wheels gave us all cause for optimism but Voodoo Lounge confirmed their return. Forget "dad rock"... This is good, solid, in yer face rock'n'roll. Buy it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars This record I bought for two reasons 1/it was by ..., 6 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Voodoo Lounge (Audio CD)
This record I bought for two reasons 1/it was by the stones 2/the price £1.00 or less .I did not know the album or any tracks all I can say is that its ok there really is not anything that stands out but at this sort of price whocares
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Stones Craft A Competent Sounding Yet Insubstantial Offering, 5 Oct. 2006
By 
Jervis - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Voodoo Lounge (Audio CD)
Unfortunately by the mid-nineties a Stones album release was designed as more of a way of advertising their current tour than a creative venture in its own right. The tour logo cover of 'Voodoo Lounge' speaks volumes.

'Voodoo Lounge' isn't as slickly produced as their previous album 'Steel Wheels' although it's still highly professional sounding.

The songs are sequenced very well and there's a nice variety of styles which is quite pleasing to the ear, however many of these songs lack depth which eventually leads to a very insubstantial album. Too many of the rockers ('Sparks Will Fly', 'I Go Wild' etc') seem forced, cliched and occasionally unnecessarily crude while the ballads although generally more effective are still not particuarly memorable. It's only on 'Out Of Tears' that the Stones sound promising enough to evoke memories of their former greatness yet even this track doesn't quite carry it through.

'Voodoo Lounge' is ultimately a very competently played/produced piece of work yet there isn't one song that ever goes beyond that to attain anything approaching greatness or even inspiring. It may be well crafted - yes - but there's nothing here to suggest a return to form.

It probably deserves 2.5 stars, however.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Could have been excellent - with better editing, 27 Nov. 2008
This review is from: Voodoo Lounge (Audio CD)
The best Stones album in terms of number of good songs since Some Girls. However, the latter Stones albums have suffred increasingly from lack of editing of weak material. Perhaps it is because the only way all the egos can work together is by tolerating each others foibles, but it is a real shame. Cutting out "You Got Me Rocking" - heavy footed and not inspired, "Brand New Car" - awful, "Thru and Thru" - way too long and noodly, "Moon Is Up" - vapid, and "Sparks Will Fly" - damp squib, would have left a really strong product. I suspect we will never see a classic Stones album again, but this could have been close as there was enough good material to fill an album without the dross.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 24 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Voodoo Lounge (Audio CD)
Excellent service fast delivery thankyou highly recommended
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Best in years, 16 Nov. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Voodoo Lounge (Audio CD)
I wouldn't go as far to say this album was really good but compared to what they've made in the 20 years previous of this it' a masterpiece. As dad rock goes Love is strong was a pretty good listen with its gritty guitar. There are even some classic stones ballads on here in the form of Blinded by rainbows.. a sweet ditty reminiscent of the Goats head period.
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