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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 18 September 2002
This is Blondie singer Debbie Harry's second solo album, and, in my opinion, her best. Although there are only nine tracks, all of them are good - and most of them are great! Four of the nine were released as singles, which shows how high the overall quality of the album is. The highlights are probably French Kissin and Free To Fall, but there is simply not a bad song to be found on the album. Debbie's solo work is usually quite different from her work with Blondie; most of her songs have very strong beats. The rest are usually a little more slushy than Blondie songs. In this album, Debbie alternates between the two - the odd-numbered tracks have strong beats, even-numbered ones are on the slushy side. But, as I already said, all of them are good! This album easily makes my top ten, despite only having nine tracks - think about what that means. Then buy it! :^)
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 13 August 2003
I can't understand why Debbie Harry's solo work is so overlooked. This album has a distinctive style with some extremely well crafted songs and excellent production. The hit track Fench Kissin' is good but is in fact my least favourite. Free to Fall and In Love with Love the follow up singles were far superior. Other tracks to look out for are Beyond the Limit and Secret Life. So what if Blondie had one of the best drummers in pop. This solo venture is worth a visit.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I think that this has to rate as my favourite Debbie Harry solo album.
I just listened to it again for the first time in ages and had to share with you how fantstic this collection is.
The album marked Debbie's return to pop stardum after a few wilderness years following the first Blonide break up and Debbie's break looking after Chris's illness. The comeback single 'French Kissing' was remarkable enough, but the follow up singles 'Free To Fall' and 'In Love With Love' were equally good and deserved to be big hits.
There are a number of excellent album tracks here too including my favourite 'You Got Me In Trouble' which has really good feel to it and 'Buckle Up'. In all this is a tremendous effort from Debbie, in probably her most 'poppy' album. Her other solo albums were often more experimental in parts.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 4 September 2007
In 1986 French Kissin' appeared as if from nowhere. Four years had passed since Debbie Harry had last been visible - aside from an occasional shot papped of her in NY. Suddenly she was back and the sadness which hung over the end of Blondie, and the commercial failure of her Koo Koo album evaported. Suddenly she was back. Briefly.

French Kissin' reached no.8 in the UK - her only solo Top Ten here. The video captured her sense of fun, style and for once - humour. An odd choice of a second single - another ballad - was Free to Fall which flopped, and a questionable remix of the lovely In Love With Love by Stock Aitken and Waterman saw the end of the promotion of the album. Like the previous single, In Love With Love stalled around the mid40s. There were some other good songs on the record such as You Got Me In Trouble and Secret Life, but in 1986 the other blonde - whose name we shall not mention! - released True Blue. In the US, both artists shared the same label and one was prioritised over the other. In the UK, Rockbird reached no.32.

Fast-forward 21 years to 2007, and much of this album has dated badly due to the production, not the writing. Main exmples being I Want You and Buckle Up. In 2007 Koo Koo or Def Dumb and Blonde sound fresher than Rockbird. That said, if you haven't discovered this album with its iconic Andy Warhol painted background art, this is a vital and enjoyable link in the Debbie Harry story.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 30 May 2010
Four years after the demise of Blondie, Deborah Harry finally returned with her second solo album. `Rock Bird' is a slick pop piece that largely abandons the facets of Harry's long-established, enigmatic personal style in favour of commercial gloss. Producer, Seth Justman, who played keyboards for the J. Geils Band (`Centrefold', `Freeze Frame'), opts for frothy (at the time) contemporary style over substance, which ends up leaving Harry sounding like one of the pack instead of the leader she had always been.

Everything here is catchy and infectious, with probably the most interesting track being the single, `French Kissin'. Harry and long-time partner and Blondie guitarist, Chris Stein, contribute three songs (`In Love With Love', `Rockbird' and `Secret Life'), with their rocky and amusing title track being the best (and biggest departure) on the album. Harry penned the others mostly with Justman. And the closing partnership with Nile Rodgers, `Beyond the Limit', sounds like a leftover from her dire first solo album, `Koo Koo', though with better production.

It is hard to shake the feeling that Justman's slick, bubble-gummy, of-the-moment production robs Harry of the authority she needs to really shine, though to a far lesser extent than Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards did on `Koo Koo'. Generally, the songs tend to run too long, which also detracts from a sense of quality. It also tends to indicate that Harry needs a producer who really understands her, as Mike Chapman did when she was in Blondie. But in a post-Blondie world, at least she was recording again, even if it was as a shadow of her former self. Definitely one for the bargain bin.
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