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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An interesting alternative to the original recording.
Much of the controversy surrounding this new, remastered release of Epsilon in Malaysian Pale seems to centre around the fact that a number of changes have been made to the original 1975 recording. I can totally understand those who are used to the earlier version being disappointed when they hear this. Music can often evoke strong memories of particular times and places...
Published on 6 Mar 2006 by C. Wheeldon

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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars "nice"
This album is a pale imitation of a brilliant original, the soul has been removed leaving it merely "nice"! Hey Edgar when are you going torelease the original for comparison?
Published on 28 July 2005 by jeremy marshall


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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An interesting alternative to the original recording., 6 Mar 2006
By 
C. Wheeldon "christian_wheeldon" (Newcastle, England) - See all my reviews
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Much of the controversy surrounding this new, remastered release of Epsilon in Malaysian Pale seems to centre around the fact that a number of changes have been made to the original 1975 recording. I can totally understand those who are used to the earlier version being disappointed when they hear this. Music can often evoke strong memories of particular times and places and it can be shocking to hear your beloved albums changed, as if the past has been re-written.
I approached this new re-recording from an interesting angle in that I heard it before I managed to track down the original. My verdict is that I would rate it as an interesting alternative to the 1975 version. I'm actually inclined to say that I may even think it is better.
So: for those familiar with the original what has changed? Well: the title track has a new intro and outro. Those train sounds have been replaced by an interesting clanging metal sound, as if construction is taking place in the jungle. Much of the original mellotron work is intact and there are also some more contemporary keyboard sounds subtly applied over the top. Although the original had an appealing minimalism, this version has a lush sound, making it appropriate for the evocation of a jungle environment.
Maroubra Bay starts with the same menace as the original but the waves crash with more power. They also appear more prominently throughout the track, to great atmospheric effect. That fantastic sequencer pattern (which seemed to anticipate techno music) is softer in this version. There is also a very faint sound, like jingling bells or wind chimes over the top. The 1975 recording is more driving, whereas this has a slightly dreamy feel. As with the title track there are modern synths but they are subtly applied throughout and the essence of the original has been kept.
My verdict is that this is one of the best albums I've ever heard and fans of both ambient and electronic music will love it. If you are familar with the original don't buy this expecting the same thing as you may well be disappointed. It presents a different take, rather than a straight re-recording.
As a final point the original version deserves a re-release too because it is also a stunning record and an important piece of musical history.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars "nice", 28 July 2005
By 
jeremy marshall (blandford forum., dorset United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This album is a pale imitation of a brilliant original, the soul has been removed leaving it merely "nice"! Hey Edgar when are you going torelease the original for comparison?
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Ruined the original!, 19 Feb 2006
By 
David Hulme "OldVillain" (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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The secret with Art is to know when to stop adding. The original Epsilon in Malaysian Pale was pure magic. It was a beautiful, moving piece of music.
I bought the re-released CD recently and I was horrified at the overlay of rubbish that masks the underlying beauty of the original.
I have the original on cassette tape, so I know what I'm talking about!
Now I must search for the original recording (on a CD)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Its still good, 9 July 2013
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I an listening to it as I write this its not the same as it was first laid down, its been tweeked in the Eastgate way an upgraded I have it on vinyl so can draw on the original its still good.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars butchered, 24 Aug 2006
By 
feline1 (Brighton, Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
I am lucky enough to have the original Virgin Records CD of "Epsilon in Malaysian Pale", which is probably my favourite album of all time. This reworking by Froese from 2005 is awful. He has just dubbed a load of bland digital synth sounds over the original gorgeous mellotron and analogue stuff. What a tasteless nitwit! It's like a child scribbling in felt tip and crayon over a masterpiece. Down with this sort of thing!
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4.0 out of 5 stars mixed views, 27 Feb 2012
By 
Mr. Mark Stevenson "Marcus" (Scotland, UK) - See all my reviews
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To be fair this is nothing like as bad as some of EWF butchering - i mean remixing - classics, but as others note, why can't we have the originals & "remixes" on the same CD. There's room aplenty!
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why re-record?, 10 Aug 2005
By 
I've loved this album since it first came out, although I lost my copy of it years ago. I am so glad that it's been released again - it's two truly excellent pieces of music. Ambient really doesn't get much better than this. Unlike Edgar's current Dalinetopia, I can sit down to listen to this, and generally ponder the cover picture. It all fits, and is the same lovely experience that it was years ago.
It's been re-recorded, so it is not quite the original. I am vaguely aware of some differences, but that doesn't spoil it at all for me. If you are into Mellotrons, there's plenty, and it all makes this album a real treasure in the history of music. Having said that, I'd be more than content if the original had simply been re-released. Why fiddle around Egdar?
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Electronic Masterpiece, 3 Jun 2012
By 
Gary Howchen "No Turn Unstoned" (Essex, UK) - See all my reviews
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My review of this album is based on the original rather than any subsequent version but in my opinion it is by some distance Edgar Froese's finest solo effort and its immediate accessibility provides a sharp contrast to the musical output of Tangerine Dream around the period of Atem and Phaedra.
Consisting of just two tracks that originally occupied each side of the vinyl version it pays eloquent homage to Australasia and conjures up a feeling of actually being there at the time when Edgar, Monique and their (then) young son Jerome toured circa 1973.
Whereas subsequent solo and TD releases became more technical and orthodox in rhythm and structure this album still bears the hallmark of early more organic work being in places reminiscent of Alpha Centauri and Zeit whilst being entirely electronic.
Each piece ebbs and flows and features various movements and shifts that make for rewarding listening as they become increasingly familiar after several listens; a twentieth century classic that deserves to be regarded as a modern equivalent to Dvorak or Holst in its ambition and realisation.
One of my 20 favourite albums from the day I first heard it nearly 40 years ago.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Why change something that was perfect?, 22 Aug 2007
I have to agree with the other reviewers on this page who find this 'reissue' disappointing. I purchased the original on vinyl way back in the late seventies when it was a new record. It was quite stunning at the time, with a softer, melodic emphasis, and yet the hypnotic transcendental qualities that made the then current Tangerine Dream releases so powerful and unique. I was then, as I still am, ever searching for something to follow up and equal the album Rubycon, which still seems to best piece of 'electronic' music ever recorded. 'Epsilon' was another milestone, and seemed to hold out promise for ever more sophisticated, thoughtful, probing, 'composed' electronic music. As an impoverished postgrad student in the eighties I sold a lot of records to raise money, and unfortunately 'Epsilon' was one of them. I was very pleased a year or so ago when this album was 're-released', but was shocked, puzzled and disappointed at what eventually turned up. 'Episilon' has lost its uniqueness; it now sounds like any number of more recent Tangerine Dream recordings; that quality of pared down sophitication seems to have been lost under a welter of synthetic strings; the endless spiralings of the electronic flute with echo seems to have melted away, and the subtle intro of the sequencer beat now hardly seems noticeable as anything 'new' within the piece. Given that this album represents such a cornerstone in the development of electronic music, I canot see why the original should not have been released: who else is buying this apart from those of us who are seeking to upgrade or replace original vinyl stock? And I really miss the atmospheric moodiness of the original, which to me seems only relocateable in the flute passage towards the end of Rubycon pt 2. Whatever next -- Phaedra with drums and hip-hop vocals?
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars This remake has destroyed the essence of original 1975 release, 15 Mar 2013
By 
Joseph Griffin "Joe Griffin" (Berlin , Germany) - See all my reviews
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The original LP edition as issued in 1975 was a beautiful haunting recording.
It remains still to this day one of my favourite music albums.

But THIS totally reworked version has removed all the beauty of the original release.
Nothing is left of the original music.

I have been fortunately able to buy a re-master of the original on a 3 CD boxed set entitled: Solo [1974-1983] The Virgin Years . This was released in November 2012.

My advice - buy the boxed set (priced reasonably) instead. It is worth it just for the excellent faithful remastering of the original master tape version of the 1975 Epsilon In Malaysian Pale recording alone.
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Epsilon in Malaysian Pale
Epsilon in Malaysian Pale by Edgar Froese (Audio CD - 1990)
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