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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Britain's Grateful Dead?
For a long time this album was unavailable and, in line with the old maxim of absence making the heart grow fonder, its reputation grew to the extent that that it was perceived as Britain's lost psych masterpiece. Today's critics are made of sterner stuff though, and existing Amazon reviews of the album vary from the relatively under-impressed - "Average 60's rock,...
Published 4 months ago by Dangerous Dave

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars average 60's rock, listenable & ok
From a collector and connoisseur of trippy psychedelia:
Patchy, country rock, with a gentle nod in the direction of psyche/prog-rock. There's so much better out there, and none of the tracks here are essential for me, although none are truly awful. I actually think the extra tracks are ok, with only one of those being among the 4 weakest tracks. If you like 60's...
Published on 30 July 2011 by a reviewer


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars average 60's rock, listenable & ok, 30 July 2011
This review is from: Mighty Baby (Audio CD)
From a collector and connoisseur of trippy psychedelia:
Patchy, country rock, with a gentle nod in the direction of psyche/prog-rock. There's so much better out there, and none of the tracks here are essential for me, although none are truly awful. I actually think the extra tracks are ok, with only one of those being among the 4 weakest tracks. If you like 60's mildly jazzy country prog rock, then this may be for you, but if, like me, you like a more lysergic feel, old or new, then why not try out Fifty foot hose (Cauldron), Lothar & The Hand People / The Spoils Of War / The Moving Sidewalks / Bill Holt / Zodiac / Twink / Trance Tripping / Beta Band (3Eps) / 3rd Rail / A Monstrous Psychedelic Bubble Exploding / WCPAEB (West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band) / USA / Timothy Leary / KLF (Chill Out album) / Broadcast & the Focus Group - nearly all available on Amazon last time I looked. Also, try to get hold of the 12 disc `Psychedelic Reaction' set (CDs 1-3 especially) - it includes many more trippy versions of 60's stuff that often appears on other collections. Happy hunting! I hope this review was helpful to you :)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Britain's Grateful Dead?, 18 Mar 2014
By 
Dangerous Dave (Berkhamsted, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Mighty Baby (Audio CD)
For a long time this album was unavailable and, in line with the old maxim of absence making the heart grow fonder, its reputation grew to the extent that that it was perceived as Britain's lost psych masterpiece. Today's critics are made of sterner stuff though, and existing Amazon reviews of the album vary from the relatively under-impressed - "Average 60's rock, listenable & OK", and, "by no means a classic", to the positive, ecstatic even - "one of the crown jewels of the UK 60's psychedelic scene".

My own view comes somewhere in between those two extremes. I was lucky enough to see the band a couple of times at the Roundhouse way back when, and can confirm that their natural mode of operation was to state the theme of a song and then settle into a jam typically of over ten minutes duration, before returning to restate the theme once or twice before the end. So what, you may say; wasn't that was most "psych" bands did? True, but the difference was that, (a), their songs were usually more than just frames on which to hang the jamming, and, (b), the jamming when it came, was usually structured and inventive rather than experimental / ground-breaking / repetitive / aimless, depending on which adjective you prefer and how much you'd been imbibing.

And I guess if you were going to make comparisons it would to the Dead of "Live/Dead" which also came out in 1969, or to Quicksilver as evidenced by that band's first couple of albums. No other major Brit psych band evoked such comparisons. The Floyd and the Softs had their own unique sounds; Caravan had the Canterbury near jazz feel; Quintessence did Asian style chanting; Procul did the pseudo Bach bit; early T Rex were sort of acid folk; the Broughtons had the Beefheart regurgitated blues sound (coupled with homegrown demonalia); the Move were really a singles band, and so on.

On this album, the first real outing from the band (with the "Mighty Baby" hat on), the jamming has been constrained but certainly isn't non-existent. The guys seem to have mastered the trick of keeping the interest level up without moving into overly elaborate structural change (which was the wont of later prog outfits). The original eight tracks vary from just under five minutes in length, to just over six minutes so there is nothing here which outstays its welcome. Group harmony singing at a near C,S and N level is also present but with less of the noodling and more of a solid beat than you got from that band. Roughly half of these songs have melodies which could have withstood a trimming down to single's length treatment and emerged as memorable records. "Egyptian Tomb" and "House without windows" are two that particularly stick in the brain.

The tracks don't sparkle lyrically, but looking back to that era, such titles as "Same way from the sun", "I'm from the country", and, "At a point between fate and destiny" do have an endearing quality about them. And apart from the great Syd there weren't many masters of profundity on the British psych scene

The five bonus tracks come from 1968 during the period the Action were morphing into Mighty Baby. Typically shorter and tighter than the original LP tracks, all are of interest. "My favourite day" is a delightful pastiche of the Beach Boys circa "Pet Sounds" and the sort of thing the High Llamas were doing quite a few years later. "Only dreaming" is also very good with a little of the band's soul cum R&B heritage showing through. These tracks were also issued together on an EP entitled "The Action Speak Louder Than Words".

Looking back on my words I do seem to have been damning the album with faint praise. There isn't anything dramatically innovative or startling about its contents. Much of it is reflective of the sounds coming out of San Francisco and somewhat further south, a year or two before the release of this set. But the music is impeccably performed and only rarely does it drop into the "let's just keep this groove going, guys" mode. You can't always say that about the big name SF bands, much of whose recorded output could be patchy, and whose reputation often rested more on their live acts than their studio work. Okay that's a bit of a generalisation but I think you can see where I'm coming from.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clasic late 60's rarity from the start of the Ladbroke Grove scene.., 24 May 2007
By 
Sir Elias Dee "Doctor of Phanerothymology" (My physical being is on the earthly plane) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Mighty Baby [VINYL] (Vinyl)
At long last one of the Crown Jewels of the UK 60's psychedelic scene is properly reissued on vinyl in it's original gatefold sleeve. Featuring beautiful front cover artwork by legendary UK/Australian psychedelic artist Martin Sharp Mighty Baby's first album was made by a band that had evolved from mod soul band The Action who briefly became a fixture on the UK hippy underground. As Mighty Baby they recorded two great albums and appeared on the triple Glastonbury Fayre album. This their first record from 1969 (originally on Head Records) mixes progressive and west coast psychedelic influences with eastern vibes and some folksy/country rock touches. It's a wonderful album very much of its time by a band that were really part of the UK underground...
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mighty, Mighty Baby, 4 Nov 2003
This review is from: Mighty Baby (Audio CD)
I'm giving this CD the 5 big Stars because I just love the album, and I'd recommend it to anyone who listens to "progressive" music. Great songs, individual musicianship, and a coherence that keeps me playing it. Although Mighty Baby is a product of the late-60's / early-70's, and the music/lyrics often reflect these times, the strong jazz influence within the band has helped to create music which endures and continues to have an appeal today. Although I would hesitate to call this music Fusion Jazz it was Mighty Baby's creative and experimental music that ultimately turned me on to the jazz genre. Just buy it!
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best thing they did, 6 Dec 2006
This review is from: Mighty Baby (Audio CD)
In theory, the singles released as The Action, now collected on "The Ultimate Action" are the defining moments of this aggregate. I beg to differ - whilst the Action created some superb pop singles, nothing they released compares to the sum of this LP. The tracks range from Psych to Country but everything sound like Mighty Baby - there isn't a bad track.

Big Beat have added 5 rare tracks that were recorded before this LP but didn't see the light of day until the mid 80s. Stylistically, they differ somewhat but they make a worthwhile rather than essential addition.

Mighty Baby made an inferior follow up: Jug Of Love and contributed a track to Glastonbury. They also backed Reg King (the old Action vocalist) on his debut LP.
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars And they played live last night!, 14 April 2006
This review is from: Mighty Baby (Audio CD)
Completely agree with the previous reviewers - if this had been an American band the album would be in Top 100 polls. Such a tight and inventive band. It's hard to define just what style it is they are playing in as they fuse rock, psych, power pop and jazz fusion so seamlessly.

And get this on 13th April 2006 - 35 years after last performing - Martin Stone, Roger Powell and Mike Evans reformed in London as Might Baby with Matt Deighton of Mother Earth taking the Alan King role. They were bloody fantastic, playing most of the first album and encoring with a long improvisation on Coltrane's India. Real high energy stuff that knocked today's bands into a cocked hat. Martin, Roger and Mike had lost none of their skills - Martin said on stage 'this is coming easier than we expected!' and how right he was as he ripped out one stinging solo after another. A marvellous night at the Rocket in Holloway Road. If they join the summer festival circuit go and catch them - ooo-wee!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Different!, 20 Jan 2014
This review is from: Mighty Baby (Audio CD)
Had this recommended and it's okay.
Pleasant to listen to and fills all the needs for the era.
I like it!
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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Genuinely Good Album from the Late 60's, 24 Feb 2005
By 
J. Bloss "jethrox1" (Buckingham,UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Mighty Baby (Audio CD)
This definitely an album that has quality throughout - as the previous reviewer states some of the lyrics are a bit dated but then again it's also part of their charm. However the music is excellent without disappearing too deeply into the depths of Prog and it is an enjoyable album to listen to all the way through. This band actually mutated out of the Mod band The Action ( with a couple of personnel additions ) and the last 5 tracks actually are pre-Mighty Baby. Having said that they are all decent tracks too and are a welcome bonus. This is definitely an album to be recommended to anyone who likes late 60's rock.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superlative music, 16 Aug 2009
This review is from: Mighty Baby (Audio CD)
This is one of the best albums ever. Every one of this band of transfigured Mods was a maestro and they gelled perfectly as a musical unit, so that it is a real honour and a deep joy to listen to 'Mighty Baby's first album. Words and notes fly into a beatific unity. Psychedelic, spiritual, emotionally-moving, driving, eclectic and electric, quite simply this is rock music at its very best.
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5 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Almost but not quite..., 16 Feb 2007
By 
Mr T "meltcity" (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Mighty Baby (Audio CD)
An interesting album but certainly not one of the best I've heard from the era. That's not necessarily a bad thing as the late 60s / early 70s was a very musically rich period. I say about half the tracks are good, the others a bit lacking. It's psych-tinged progressive rock and not particularly original, but what the hey! For me, the highlights are "Egyptian Tomb", "Friend You Know But Never See", "Same Way from the Sun" and "Trials of a City", all of which are fairly spacey, with some cool guitar work and relatively frenetic drumming. The rest of the album I could do without, to be honest. Mighty Baby were a UK group, but on tracks like "I've Been Down So Long" and "I'm from the Country" they seem to be attempting a West Coast, Grateful Dead / Jefferson Airplane groove. They do their best but it doesn't come off. The bonus tracks are, to be frank, awful: amateurish with low production. So overall, the album is what I'd call "patchy". Certainly not the classic it's made out to be with large sections being little more than jams.
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