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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A well-researched review of our current knowledge about the famous boy king of ancient Egypt, 11 July 2014
This review is from: Discovering Tutankhamun: From Howard Carter to DNA (Paperback)
With so many books about Tutankhamun already available, is there room for yet another? Zahi Hawass argues he can now add new information about the king and his family based on the recent DNA testing, while in his foreword, Jaromir Malek points out Hawass’ personal involvement in the research into Tutankhamun, which allows him to bring first-hand recollections to his account of the boy king.

Hawass begins with chapters on Egypt in the Eighteenth Dynasty leading up to Tutankhamun’s reign, followed by a discussion of ancient Egyptian religion. He describes the early excavations in the Valley of the Kings and the work of Howard Carter and his team. Although the account of Carter’s work is quite brief, Hawass does at least name-check the other people involved in finding and clearing the tomb, whose work is often overlooked. The page dedicated to Hussein Abdel Rasoul, the boy who found the tomb, is a nice touch, with Rasoul photographed wearing one of Tutankhamun’s pectorals.

There then follows a detailed exploration of the tomb and its treasures, the research carried out on the mummies of Tutankhamun and his ‘family’ using x-rays, CT scan and DNA testing, a summary of later discoveries in the Valley, useful appendices listing the objects found in the tomb and held in museums worldwide, and a list of Tutankhamun tours which have helped to fund the new Grand Egyptian Museum at Giza, soon to house the king and his treasures; as Hawass points out, it is unlikely that any of Tutankhamun’s objects will travel abroad again.

There is a rather bizarre chapter on the ‘curse of Tutankhamun’, with Hawass (a curse non-believer) claiming that Mansour Boraik, the Director of Luxor, and a Japanese television crew were completely spooked by the curse. There is also an account of his failed request to the German authorities for the return of Nefertiti’s bust, with the promise that, should he return to the SCA again, he will reopen the case and see that someday justice is done!

But these aside, and whether or not you agree with all the findings of the DNA research, this book is a well-illustrated review of what is currently known about the life, death and burial of Tutankhamun with beautiful and detailed photography of the king and his treasures. It is also the ‘Official Companion’ for the upcoming exhibition Discovering Tutankhamun at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford.

Reviewed by ancientegyptmagazine dot com
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 5 July 2014
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Janis Jackson - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Discovering Tutankhamun: From Howard Carter to DNA (Paperback)
a well presented book.
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Discovering Tutankhamun: From Howard Carter to DNA
Discovering Tutankhamun: From Howard Carter to DNA by Zahi Hawass (Paperback - 30 Nov 2013)
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