Shop now Shop now Shop now Up to 70% off Fashion Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Amazon Fire TV Amazon Pantry Food & Drink Beauty Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen in Prime Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars67
4.3 out of 5 stars
Format: Audio CDChange
Price:£11.22+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 4 March 2013
I studied Twelfth Night for 'O' Level English Lit. many years ago and throughly enjoyed revisiting this play on my kindle.
0Comment2 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 February 2015
Perfect book for GCSE students - the glossary at the back is very helpful.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 November 2015
Item as ex.expected, very quick delivery
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 June 2013
Here Shakespeare borrows as so often in his comedies, from Plautus for the overarching plot--the separated siblings, the twinning (recall his Errors, and the Menaechmi), the arrival from sea. But he adds so much as to make it unrecognizable as a Roman comedy. He adds an attractive drunk, Sir Toby, who fleeces a silly aristocrat who--perhaps alone in literature-- knows himself to be silly. He adds, for instance, a parody of Renaissance psychiatry (well, more theology, but since "psyche" in Greek is both "soul" and "mind," that's fair) practiced on Shakespeare's only American. Instead of the common psyche ward question, "What does 'the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence' mean to you?" Feste as Reverend Psychiatrist asks, "What is the opinion of Pythagoras concerning the soul?" Remember, you can't get out of the psyche ward unless you answer right. Well, Malvolio DOES get it right, he hits it out of the park, but Feste keeps him in lockdown anyway. Why?
Herein lies a tale. Malvolio is portrayed as stark raving mad simply because he wants to marry the boss's daughter--or really, the boss herself. A crazy idea. An American idea, one that would take a couple centuries and a Revolution to be accepted by anybody at all. Those rejects on the other side of the Atlantic.
Yes, Malvolio is Shakespeare's only American (except possibly Othello?). And he is indeed, as he himself pleads at plays end, notoriously abused. He vows revenge on the whole pack--which we, as delighted playgoers, cannot support, though justice, and America, are on his side. [See A Powers' "Rings and Vows in TN" in Schiffer, Twelfth Night: New Critical Essays, 2010.)
0Comment0 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 August 2015
Its Bill, so of course its good!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 December 2014
Great Book Seller +++++++++++
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 January 2016
Needed for exam,brilliant.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 August 2015
Shakespeare's best comedy.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 July 2015
Great item, thanks.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 December 2014
Item as described
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.