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52 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rome certainly wasn't built in a day!
Holland's narrative style means that even those with little, or no, previous knowledge of Roman history can soon find themselves totally engrossed, and enriched, by the story of the Republic's rise and fall.
It is not just the people and personalities that come to life in this book, but the nature of Rome itself. The reader is not just taken on a journey through the...
Published on 2 July 2004 by Mr. Gavin P. Brooks

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing
Rubicon was a let-down for me after the reading the praise it has received from Amazon reviewers and other critics. Holland's coverage of the topic is superficial, focussed on the "great men" of the period and never successfully penetrating the surface of the society or developing the characters. The analysis is weak and the same points are repeated throughout the book...
Published on 2 Jan 2006 by CFB London


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52 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rome certainly wasn't built in a day!, 2 July 2004
Holland's narrative style means that even those with little, or no, previous knowledge of Roman history can soon find themselves totally engrossed, and enriched, by the story of the Republic's rise and fall.
It is not just the people and personalities that come to life in this book, but the nature of Rome itself. The reader is not just taken on a journey through the personal aspirations of each player, but through the mindset and aspirations of Rome as a whole.
Holland is not afraid to include the small details, such as salacious gossip of the time, which helps to add to the colour and vibrancy and brings the ancient city back to life. While the violence can appear as a bloody reminder of how far civilisation may have moved on, the political machinations have a far more familiar ring to them.
The book is littered with reminders of how much today's society has taken from, and owes to, Roman times. However, this is not done in a preachy pointed manner, rather the evidence is there for the reader to pick up on, and judge for themselves.
The main historical figures of the time, Cicero, Caesar, Pompey, etc, are the main focus of each section. Rubicon allows us to see the interaction and the power play between each of them. As the story of the alliances, oppositions and betrayals unfolds, the urge to keep reading is immense.
The book refers back to previous events in chapters, which serves to reinforce the readers understanding of events. There are maps that help to explain where places are, and their relation to Rome at the time.
Obviously, covering such a vast amount of time, and such an array of people, means that the book can only really scratch the surface of the period it covers. However, you are left with a genuine feeling that you have a better understanding of the Republic, both of itself, and the people who played a part in its history.
The book ends tantalisingly partway through Rome's history, as the Republic falls, and the Emperor's dominance begins. A subject you hop Holland will follow up with.
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you don't own it, buy it or rent it from the library, 25 Mar 2007
If you are unfamiliar with this period of history, this is perhaps the most accessible one-volume account published to date.
Having honed his narrative skills on dark `gothic horror' thrillers Holland has brought the trails and travails of the late Roman Republic to a new generation of readers. From the Gracchi to Marius, from Sulla through Caesar to Augustus, with incisive insight into characters from Pompey to Cicero.
All these names will become familiar to the new reader, whilst the pacey narrative will draw anyone with prior knowledge of this period along.
Superb!
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book by another name...UK readers beware!, 19 Nov 2005
By 
This is the same text as "Rubicon: The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic", so previous comments apply. Don't be silly and buy both titles :)
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73 of 80 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "I Dream, And Have Long Dreamed, Of Seeing Alexandria", 20 Oct 2003
By 
Bruce Loveitt (Ogdensburg, NY USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The above is a quote from Cicero. High praise indeed, for he mostly thought that any place which wasn't Rome was "squalid obscurity." But, as Tom Holland points out, most Romans thought of Alexandria as the one city that could compete with Rome as the centre of the world. Alexandria was the first city ever to have numbered addresses. It also had slot machines and automatic doors. Perhaps most importantly for the Romans it contained two other things: the tomb of Alexander The Great and the greatest library in the world. The library "boasted seven hundred thousand scrolls and had been built in pursuit of a sublime fantasy: that every book ever written might be gathered in one place." Mr. Holland's book is very good for several reasons. Firstly, it is well-written - both in terms of style (he has a background as a novelist) and also because it is written in the language of today rather than the language of 2,000 years ago. That statement may offend purists. If it does, I'm sorry, but I'm just being honest. For someone who is not a classical scholar, like myself, it makes the material much easier to read. The book is also good because Mr. Holland doesn't just describe historical events - he also gets into the Roman psyche and culture. Thus, we learn of the inherent conservatism of the Romans, which was always in conflict with ambition and ego. Men such as Sulla and Pompey, when implementing changes, always made an attempt to justify their actions by saying they were really trying to turn back the clock - that other people had disregarded precedent and they were only trying to restore tradition. We learn how important public service was to the Romans. You were frowned upon if you retired to the country and tried to live a life of idle pleasure. To do that was to shirk your responsibility to the community. Community was extremely important to the Romans. (Mr. Holland mentions that the Romans constructed "high-rise" buildings and, unlike today, the top floor was considered the worst place to live. That's where the poor people were put. The reason? The higher up you lived, the more "cut off" you were from the streets - and the community - below.) Another example of Roman conservatism was that there was a general suspicion of young people. Young people were too frivolous - too interested in clothes and food and sex. (This was why the Senate was made up of middle-aged men. Indeed, the word senate comes from "senex" - meaning "old man.") Proper Roman women were not supposed to show much interest in sex. Hence the saying, "a matron has no need of lascivious squirmings." (Leave that to the courtesans.) Regarding politics and "dishing the dirt," Mr. Holland shows us that things haven't changed so much in 2,000 years - we learn that Julius Caesar's enemies sniggered that he was "a man for every woman, and a woman for every man." Aspects of appearance and personality are brought to the forefront on almost every page: Marc Antony, despite his bravery in battle, was looked down upon by many people because of his reputation as a "party animal."; when Julius Caesar crossed the Rhine he thought it would be undignified to do so by boat. So he had a bridge built. After teaching the Germanic tribes to have some respect for Rome, he crossed back into Gaul and had the bridge torn down; if her image on ancient coins was anything to go by, far from looking like Elizabeth Taylor, Cleopatra was actually "scrawny and hook-nosed." (That didn't stop her from having a son by Julius Caesar and twins by Marc Antony.) This book is a very good study of many aspects of Roman society - political, cultural, military, psychological (the fascination with omens and deities)- with everything held together by interesting and charismatic personalities. I did get a little confused by trying to follow some of the political maneuvering engaged in by the various factions, but I attribute that to my lack of previous reading in this area rather than to any fault on Mr. Holland's part. I found "Rubicon" to be a very rewarding read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rome and her characters brought to life...., 16 Dec 2004
By 
Lei-Lei Jayenne (Leytonstone, London) - See all my reviews
What a superb book! Having only known Tom Holland for his book Supping with Panthers, I really had no idea he was so knowledgable about this period in Ancient History. I am hugely impressed with this book and it's vivid depictions of Roman society. But more importantly, I love the way Holland has brought these great characters to life. We learn about their personality traits and private lives, though never once drifting into 'soap-opera' territory. For instance, the chapters on Sulla, I found to be both page-turningly fascinating and, in points, hilariously funny. As a student of this period in history, I can only lament that this book wasn't around when I studied for my exams, it would have made a clearer counterpoint to the speeches and biographies of Cicero and Plutarch's Roman Lives.
I too cannot recommend this book highly enough. If you haven't delved into this subject before, this would be as good a place as any to get your introduction. If you've read everything you can get your hands on regarding this subject, then you should still read this book anyway, believe me it's worth the time.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Roman History for the non-Latin scholar, 30 Aug 2004
I bought this book without having ever heard anything about it purely because I love History books and was very surprised to see this one in the top ten bestseller list in a Dublin Book Shop. I took a chance, but was rewarded by a great read written in excellent style by Tom Holland.
As a schoolboy who in a boarding school where the study of Latin was compulsory for my class, I was fascinated by the Roman Republic and later Empire. In fact this was the only part of the subject of Latin that I liked! The good news for Latin haters is that there is very little latin used in this book.
Holland's description of the Roman Republic, its main characters, lesser characters, and the politics of the time is well done - though at times a little more detail would have been useful (some sections gloss over events and people very quickly). For me, two characters (Caeser and Cicero) dominated the book and could easily form the basis of separate books. Cicero in particular would fit in today's political world with ease. He is known as a great orater, but this ability is only briefly covered in his earlier speeches at court trials. As political schemer, he has been seldom matched over the centuries since. Caeser would just be another dictator, though not in the savage mould of Hitler, Stalin or Saddam. In fact he gets sympathetic treatment from Holland for his several episodes of clemency to his enemies.
Jealously and power struggles are what the last century BC was about. However, it still seems incredible that a republic with democratically elected Consuls existed over 2000 years ago. Holland attempts to paint a "true" picture of the times and does not attempt to hide the savagery, rivalries and corruption that ravaged the Republic in its last days. Most of the main characters in this book end up suffering violent deaths.
Many of the photographs of busts and statues add little to the book and could have been left out without harming it (and lowering the price too). I also found that the number of characters is huge and sometimes hard to follow (no fault of Holland) - for example many names are similar (Catiline, Catulus, Crassus, Caelius). The timeline at the end of the book is a useful guide to events as a lot happens during this period of history.
As I write this there is a 20% discount with Amazon - excellent value. If you are new to Roman history, then this is an excellent place to start learning more. If you are an existing student of Roman History, then I think that more consistent application of detail would have been an advantage.
Thoroughly recommended.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Roman history comes alive!, 14 Mar 2004
By 
Diana Swann (Portsmouth, Hants United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
If you sweated over Caesar’s Gallic Wars or Cicero’s speeches at school put aside your prejudice and try Rubicon. You will meet living, breathing characters whose behaviour emphasises that nothing changes in the confrontation between humanity’s addiction to power and belief in democratic idealism. Their story is told in a vivid short-sentenced narrative, as elegant as the folds in a Roman toga and personalities and events are imaginatively and plausibly fleshed out from 2,000 year-old sources. My reaction was ‘Yes, it must have been like this’ whether in the great set-pieces like Caesar’s murder or lesser known events like Sulla’s brutal treatment of prisoners and Cato’s bleak and harrowing suicide. Wit and irony jostle with tragedy, whether in the description of Cleopatra’s chequered love-life, or Pompey’s propensity to blushing and his pop-star-like cultivation of his quiff of hair. Indeed after reading this book I felt like answering Shakespeare’s ‘Knew you not Pompey?’ with ‘Yes I did – I’ve just read Tom Holland’s book’.
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Die is Cast - and other Roman cliches, 2 Mar 2004
By 
David Roy (Vancouver, BC) - See all my reviews
What parallels might be drawn between the present-day United States and the Roman Republic before Julius Caesar took over? It's a fascinating question, and one that seems to be an inspiration to Tom Holland, as he mentions it in the introduction to Rubicon: The Last Years of the Roman Republic. Or, maybe it wasn't one, since this is the last time he mentions it. The reader is left to his/her own conclusions on this issue, but unfortunately the back cover draws attention to this aspect making you think that's what the book is going to be about.
Instead, he gives us a history of the fall of the Republic, from the late 2nd century BC to the death of Caesar in 44 BC. Holland covers all the wars, civil unrest and the decline of senatorial power as he shows us the events leading to dictatorship. The history is dotted with colourful characters (from Caesar to Spartacus to Cleopatra and beyond) and Holland brings them all to life, often in their own words. In doing so, Holland has produced a very readable account, meticulously researched, that will make anybody with even a mild interest in this time period clamour for more.
Holland begins (also in his introduction) by talking about the amount of information from this time period that we have access to, as it's one of the most recorded periods in ancient history. Yet even so, it's impossible to take everything written as fact, immune to different interpretations. Instead, it's a minefield where historians have to tread carefully.
"In short, the reader should take it as a rule of thumb that many statements of fact in this book could plausibly be contradicted by an opposite interpretation." Pg xx (introduction)
This is all well and good, and I'm glad that he warned us. While all history is subject to interpretation (or even outright lies, depending on what the sources are and how biased they are), the further back you go the worse it gets. However, one thing I wish Holland would have done is to acknowledge this within the text as well. It would have been interesting to see him discuss a couple of interpretations of conflicting events as he told us about them, something like:
{XX happened, according to Plutarch, but other accounts say YY happened. It seems logical to assume, given the equipment involved, that a combination of XX and YY is what truly happened.}
Instead, we get one narrative with a warning at the beginning that, we have to remember, this may not be the right one.
Holland uses a wealth of primary sources as well as sources written within the next 100-200 years after the fall of the Republic. This brings the issues sharply into focus as we get a closer look at what these people had to deal with. However, part of this goes back to the issue of bias and interpretation. Some the sources (Cicero is the primary example, but there are others) are heavily involved with these events, thus making their stories slightly suspect (or at least biased). Yes, we have to keep in mind Holland's warning in the introduction, but it's easy to lose track of this as you read the narrative.
That being said, the narrative Holland gives us is wonderful. He is very detailed, giving us somewhat of a history of each character as he introduces him/her. While this is not a history of Roman culture, but of government, he gives us enough information to get an idea of why these events were so monumental. We see the value Romans put in to their Republic and the fact that the people were able to vote on things (though of course it wasn't like our modern-day voting, where anybody can do it). With each step toward the abyss, we see the inevitability of what happened. The benefits of hindsight are wonderful, and perhaps that's where Holland's reference to current events should be placed. As we read about Marius and Sulla and other Romans who tried to enhance their own power at the expense of the Senate, are there any "characters" hanging around right now who are doing similar things?
Another place Holland excels is in keeping the various names of Roman characters straight (Gaius This and Gaius That). I've always found confusing who's who in the Roman Empire, but Holland helps this immensely. Even so, at times I had to stop and think who he was talking about, but the clearness of the narrative makes it a lot easier to keep organized in my brain. This also applies to the sometimes confusing events. Barbarians to the North, uppity kings to the East, slave revolts and other major events all combine to bring down the once mighty empire and allow one man to rise to the top to save it (dispensing with that pesky "the people decide" aspect, however). Holland is a radio personality in Britain, and I think this gives him the ability to break down the events in ways that are easier to understand. The author's description mentions he has a PhD, but it doesn't say in what, so I have no idea if it's in history or not. Even so, he seems to have done his research and presented it in an easily readable, and more importantly, fascinating narrative.
For an introduction into the Roman Republic (and especially for those of you who thought Roman history *began* with Julius Caesar), this is a great book. Do yourself a favour and pick it up.
David Roy
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating story, 3 Feb 2004
By A Customer
So much information should have been dry and difficult, but instead really comes to life. Reading this book allows you to get a real feel for the (many, many) characters involved in this period of change for Rome.
I especially liked the way that you get to understand the motivations of those involved and how the nature of Roman society and its own history affected peoples behaviour, aspirations and actions.
The parallels with more recent history are plain for all to see, but this aspect is not itself part of the text - leaving the reader to draw their own conclusions.
A must have for anyone interested in history at all, not just that of Rome.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great introdution to Roman history, 21 April 2006
By 
My interest in Rome was recently awoken by a trip around the great city it's self and realisation that I new relatively little about such a huge period in human history. For those of us who attended school in the 1990s, and whose history classes mainly focused on Hitler or the feelings of the English peasantry under the Tudors, then this is a great introduction to the magnificence of the ancient republic. Starting with the founding of the city of Rome under Romulus to the death of the mighty Augustus Caesar, this is a great piece of narrative history.

Too many books taking on great historical periods limply drag from event to event. What Tom Holland has achieved is a history that engages the reader with its vivid descriptions of the streets of ancient Rome and the great men who helped shape them. Those who criticise this book attack its writing style or lack of depth in some areas. Holland does have a rich writing style, which I found fresh, given the dry texts of many history books. The book does move at a hectic speed and the importance of the minor figures can be hard to follow but persevere and this book will be very rewarding. Rome is a huge historical period, and the lack of depth in some areas, only gives the reader an opportunity for further reading having equipped them with the basic facts of the republic.

For those how know the story of Sulla, Caesar, Anthony, Cleopatra and Octavian then buy some thing else. If you went to a school where roman history had long ceased to be taught then buy this book. It sets out the key events and reasons for the collapse of the republic, and as Holland subtly alludes to, the lessons of the great republic have resonance today.
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Rubicon. Auge y caida de la Republica Romana (Divulgacion Historia)
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