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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic read
When I ordered the book I must admit I didnt expect it to be such an interesting read. I was however pleasantly surprised. The book is layed out in such a way that it is easy to read and most definitely enjoyable, with short chapters that you can pick up and flick through without too much concentration required.

The book itself is very well presented and well...
Published on 16 Jun. 2012 by Oliver Ryan

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3 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A guide book not a history book
If your goal is to learn about arcades in general (Japanese or not) then the internet will always be the best source of information. This book simply can't compete with it at less than 200 pages.

But if you're going to Japan and don't want to research the arcades of Japan online by yourself. Then this will do as all you really need is a little guide book with a...
Published on 7 Feb. 2009 by W. Baer


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic read, 16 Jun. 2012
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This review is from: Arcade Mania: The Turbo-Charged World of Japan's Game Centers: The Turbo-charged World of Japan's Game Centers (Paperback)
When I ordered the book I must admit I didnt expect it to be such an interesting read. I was however pleasantly surprised. The book is layed out in such a way that it is easy to read and most definitely enjoyable, with short chapters that you can pick up and flick through without too much concentration required.

The book itself is very well presented and well written by a chap who has obviously done his research, it covers every aspect of the surreal world that is the japanese amusement arcade it looks at everything from grab machines to card based arcade games and everything in between and covers these in just the right amount of depth the chapters dont bore you but they arent too short that they miss out information, which is a definite plus.

In conclusion the book is good for anyone that remembers the days when arcade machines ruled long before the console was widely available. It certaintly seems that the arcade cabinet still reigns supreme in Japan and will continue to do so for many years to come.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ARCADE MANIA : TOUR GUIDE NOTES FROM ONE HAPPY READER, 11 Dec. 2008
By 
S. MCILROY "shaunomacx" (Northern Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Arcade Mania: The Turbo-Charged World of Japan's Game Centers: The Turbo-charged World of Japan's Game Centers (Paperback)
After spending the past few years following author Brian Ashcraft via his daily post work on respected gaming site Kotaku I was more than interested in picking up this, his first published book covering arcade game centers in Japan.

The book starts off with an introduction from the author that sets the tone for the rest of the book, its feels obvious that it is written by a man who has a great love of his subject matter (games) regardless of genre and design.

As you are led through the chapters from the front of the Arcade "Mania" with "UFO catchers" through to the "Games of Luck" and onto the "Dedicated Cabinets", "Shmups" and "Card Games", Brian keeps your interest firmly between the pages with his unique style of writing which feels more conversational to me rather than formal. Its more telling I think when an author writes as if from one fan to another rather than coming off as pretentious and overbearing which in this case isn't an issue in fact think of this as the ideal pocket guide to have as you walk around the Game Centers of Tokyo and Osaka. While it really covers the arcades on a broad basis it does mention some specific ones such as Taito Hey and from that it pieces together the elements of an arcade from his travels to quite a few of them for "research" which is a cool way of saying playing a few rounds, interviewing some of the key arcade players who are both currently on the scene or played competitively for a protracted period of time. The player profiles are in depth without being too invasive and add color to the world of Arcade Mania.

The visual presentation of the book is a joy to behold with Jean Snow and Brian Ashcrafts collaborative design giving the book a life of its own.
It feels what some would call "retro" but has a high level of polish and gloss to it which I guess makes it "Bashcraft Retro HD".

It just all feels like a complete package!

I'm giving this book 4/5 based purely on the fact that this is "Bashcrafts" first book and I'd like to set the bar to a certain height that Brian can definitely do better than. This is not to say the book is not great, it really is everything a book should be : engaging and informative, funny and intelligent and most of all, essential!

Once its sequel becomes available for pre-order you have guaranteed yourself one guaranteed customer!!!

Shaun Mc
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5.0 out of 5 stars Guided tour of the the eccentric world of Japanese arcades, 14 May 2011
This review is from: Arcade Mania: The Turbo-Charged World of Japan's Game Centers: The Turbo-charged World of Japan's Game Centers (Paperback)
The author does a great job of introducing the reader to the bizarre collection of game types that co-exist in Japanese arcades, with help from both creators and celebrated players who know the most about them.

On first flicking through the book I was initially dissappointed that the focus wasn't entirely on video games, as the front cover infers. After having read the book though I'm so glad its scope is so broad, including gambling games, pachinko, even claw (UFO-catcher) games. The context it puts on the whole arcade ecosystem in Japan is priceless.

Above all, this is a fun, authoritive read that gives more than I'd expected and served as a great reminder of the one occasion I had to visit such arcades in Tokyo (I actually understood what the hell was going on with the card-based games after reading this). Highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Works on every level, 27 Dec. 2008
This review is from: Arcade Mania: The Turbo-Charged World of Japan's Game Centers: The Turbo-charged World of Japan's Game Centers (Paperback)
The style of writing is involving in the informal house style of WIRED magazine, the structure of the book is well thought out (chapters on the different sections of a typical Japanese games arcade, a pen portrait of a notable player of each type of game, side bars on particular points of interest) and the graphics and artwork of the book are just gorgeous. I am not a gamer so I can say that it would be a mistake to think that this book's appeal is limited to that sector- anyone interested in tech or Japanese culture will find it a good buy.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Little Gem of a Book., 10 Jan. 2010
By 
John Carbery "www.wetalkgames.com" (Enniscorthy, Ireland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Arcade Mania: The Turbo-Charged World of Japan's Game Centers: The Turbo-charged World of Japan's Game Centers (Paperback)
I'd wanted to read this book for quite a while, the image of Ryu on the cover was more than enough to make me want to leaf through it, and I have to say it wasnt dissapointing in the least. What makes it unique is down to the fact that its an account of Japanese arcade culture more than it is a history lesson on Game Centre's per se.

The book basically breaks down into sections each discussing a popular part of what makes up the average game centre. The author follows many top players as they go about their day and interviews some industry behemoths not only about the difference their games made to the arcade scene but what really sparks their imagination and continues their love for the game centre in general. Reading the interview with Goichi Suda as he describes the tough kids who hung around his local, and the tricks they pulled to get free games will bring back many memories to anyone who was lucky to have similar experiences when arcades were great here in the west so many moons ago.

Simply put, this is a light and breezy book which excellently describes a wonderfully light and breezy culture.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good stuff, 1 Feb. 2009
By 
AM LANE "-Ad" (westmidlands england) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Arcade Mania: The Turbo-Charged World of Japan's Game Centers: The Turbo-charged World of Japan's Game Centers (Paperback)
If you are a fan vidoe games and if you go nuts for all things japan, this book is for you the kotaku editor, has done a great job with this book and the layout of each page draws you in with it's bright snazy graphics
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3 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A guide book not a history book, 7 Feb. 2009
By 
W. Baer (Cambridge, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Arcade Mania: The Turbo-Charged World of Japan's Game Centers: The Turbo-charged World of Japan's Game Centers (Paperback)
If your goal is to learn about arcades in general (Japanese or not) then the internet will always be the best source of information. This book simply can't compete with it at less than 200 pages.

But if you're going to Japan and don't want to research the arcades of Japan online by yourself. Then this will do as all you really need is a little guide book with a general over view and having a decent print book will always be better than a pocket full of pages printed out from your computer.

This book is strictly a "restaurant guide" sort of book. It does feature interviews with a various people tied to the industry along with decent pictures. However, like one of the sites Brian writes for (Kotaku), this book lacks a lot depth and that's unfortunate but can be said about most books on the subject of arcade gaming.
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