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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Cinder Path- Typical Cookson Brilliance
Catherine Cookson has certainly excelled in this story. I was rivetted to my seat (Which is coincidental as I was a rivetter on the Lancaster Bomber during the war). The story was set during the war and it was no doubt a similar experience that my late husband Ken experienced himself whilst he battled in the trenches. The storyline has everything including the cruelty of...
Published on 10 Jan 2003 by Olivia Hulston

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Long, dreary, and unconvincing
An over-long and dreary film, let down by wooden acting and by the excruciatingly slow pace at which the action moves. The plot is simple enough, yet is full of highly implausible developments. An intellectually inclined and very wet heir to a Northumbrian farm witnesses his martinet father's manslaughter by a much exploited farmhand and doesn't do anything about it. At...
Published on 12 July 2009 by Triestino


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Cinder Path- Typical Cookson Brilliance, 10 Jan 2003
By 
Olivia Hulston (Concord, NSW Australia) - See all my reviews
Catherine Cookson has certainly excelled in this story. I was rivetted to my seat (Which is coincidental as I was a rivetter on the Lancaster Bomber during the war). The story was set during the war and it was no doubt a similar experience that my late husband Ken experienced himself whilst he battled in the trenches. The storyline has everything including the cruelty of the Cinder Path, adultery and a good old fashioned love story. Catherine Zeta Jones (who bears an uncanny resemblance to my daughter Rita)suberbly plays the part of the adultress.I highly recommend the Cinder Path to other 80 year old women who love the intrigue and seduction of a good Catherine Cookson story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Long, dreary, and unconvincing, 12 July 2009
This review is from: The Cinder Path [DVD] (DVD)
An over-long and dreary film, let down by wooden acting and by the excruciatingly slow pace at which the action moves. The plot is simple enough, yet is full of highly implausible developments. An intellectually inclined and very wet heir to a Northumbrian farm witnesses his martinet father's manslaughter by a much exploited farmhand and doesn't do anything about it. At the urging of his family, he marries a sexy but unfaithful wife (sexy women used to be rather suspect in the far north of England, let us note in passing) and then joins the army. During his basic training, he finds to his horror that the aforementioned murderous farmhand has metamorphosed into his bullying and blackmailing sergeant but when he gets out to the trenches, our hero despite his wetness manages to conduct himself honourably while settling scores with his former tormentor. He is injured and invalided out of the army, inadvertently signs his farm away to his unpleasant sister, but falls in love with his former wife's sister, so all ends well.

Much of the action takes place before and during the First World War, and some poor soul, born no doubt over 60 years after the armistice, must have gone to immense pains to try to make sure that all the details were as authentic as possible. Partly because the plot moves so slowly and so tediously, one begins to ignore the acting and the story, and one starts to concentrate on the cornucopia of historical details instead. And my goodness, did they get things wrong, from the Sheffield Corporation tram that trundles by in central Newcastle, to the National Coal Board shunting engine that is seen pulling a troop train, to the immaculately kept trenches of the Western Front with their spotless floorboards, to the anachronistically primitive yet immaculate car that we see at the end.

This is not a bad film and might help to fill in a dull evening, just about, but it's not a good film either. The main problem, I suspect, is that Catherine Cookson was a rather boring and formulaic writer whose potboilers were almost entirely lacking in flair and originality, and in this particular instance the job of transforming her novel into a worthwhile film in the end turned out to be just too daunting. One of the few puzzling features of the exercise is that the story seems to be imbued with an acute dislike of women, odd in a female writer - almost all the women in The Cinder Path turn out to be quite awful, with characters that are deeply unattractive. Whether this is a characteristic Cookson trait I don't know, but it certainly comes to the fore in this unconvincing and generally soporific film.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Seven Film Anthology ... Catherine Cookson ... Koch Vision (2008)", 11 Mar 2008
By 
J. Lovins "Mr. Jim" (Missouri-USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Koch Vision and BBC presents "THE CATHERINE COOKSON ANTHOLOGY" (1995) (1259 mins/Color) (Dolby Digital) --- Dame Catherine Ann Cookson was an English author --- Cookson became Britain's most widely read novelist, while remaining a relatively low-profile figure in the world of celebrity writers --- Her books were inspired by her deprived youth in North East England, the setting for her novels.

Cookson took up writing as a form of therapy to tackle her depression, and joined Hastings Writers' Group --- Her first novel, Kate Hannigan, was published in 1950 --- Though it was labelled a romance, she expressed discontent with the stereotype --- Her books were, she said, historical novels about people and conditions she knew --- Cookson had little to do with the London literary circus --- She was always more interested in practicing the art of writing --- Her research could be uncomfortable - going down a mine, for instance, because her heroine came from a mining area --- Having in her youth wanted to write about "above stairs" in grand houses, she later and successfully concentrated on people ground down by circumstances, taking care to know them well.

Cookson went on to write almost 100 books, selling more than 123 million copies of her books, her works being translated into at least 20 languages --- She also authored books under the pseudonyms Catherine Marchant and a name derived from her childhood name, Katie McMullen --- She remained the most borrowed author from public libraries in the UK for more than 20 years, only losing the title in 2004, which is testament to the ongoing popularity of her novels.(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Here are the seven films featured in the eight-disc The Catherine Cookson Anthology, a few are as described on the box set's gatefold:

The Cinder Path (12 February 1995)
The downtrodden son of a farmer, married to one woman but in love with her sister, ships off to World War I in search of glory and redemption. On the front lines, he must battle not only the enemy but also the demons of self-doubt which have plagued him throughout his life.

Colour Blind (16 December 1998)
Bridget seriously offends her conservative family for marrying an African sailor. After being accused of murder, her husband is forced to leave town. As their daughter grows up, she must learn to cope with the racism surrounding her.

A Dinner of Herbs (24 November 2000)
Hal was just a boy when his father was murdered by the ruthless Dan Bannerman. Now, with a family of his own, Hal discovers that the man his daughter hopes to marry is none other than Bannerman's grandson --- Filmed on location in the north of England, "A Dinner of Herbs" is an unforgettable mix of murder, passion and revenge!

The Girl (16 February 1996)
"The Girl" focuses on a young woman who must overcome emotional and physical obstacles to finally come into the life she deserves. This tale is no different. The performances are excellent, and the costuming and locations equally well done.The acting is top notch, and the scenery and production are beautiful.

The Secret (21 January 2000)
Freddie Musgrave's life is in a state of turmoil when a letter implicates him in murder. Further complications arise when he discovers he has feelings for Belle, a woman married to a madman. In the late 1880's reformed smuggler Freddie Musgrave has worked hard to turn a legitimate trade, but then a face from his past turns up threatening to ruin things for him.

The Tide of Life (1996)
The story line and plot, follows the fortunes of young housekeeper, Emily Kennedy, (Gillian Kearney) as she learns about relationships with three very different men. Forced from home of her first employer, Sep McGilby (John Bowler) after his plans to marry her come to tragic end, Emily finds work as housekeeper for farmer, Larry Birch (Ray Stevenson). Another tragedy occurs, and when Nick Stuart (James Purefoy) inherits the farm owned by Birch's wife, Nick gives Emily a new future.

Tilly Trotter (8 January 1999)
Set in rural England during the 1930s, Tilly Trotter is the compelling story of a courageous young girl, envied by women and lusted after by men, who is accused of witchcraft, and forced to rise above the prejudice of her community.

BIOS:
Catherine Cookson (aka: Catherine Ann Davies)
Date of Birth: 27 June 1906 - Tyne Dock, South Shields, England, UK
Date of Death: 11 June 1998 - London, England, UK (blood disorder; heart ailment)

Great job by Koch Vision --- looking forward to more high quality titles from the BBC Collection film market --- order your copy now from Amazon or Koch Vision where there are plenty of copies available on DVD, stay tuned once again for top notch releases --- where they are experts in releasing long forgotten films and treasures to the collector.

Total Time: 1259 mins on DVD ~ Koch Vision KOCV-6511 ~ (1/22/2008)
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Catherine Cookson - The Cinder Path [VHS] [1994]
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