Customer Reviews


8 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars fabuleux
possibly the greatest novel ever written, every paragraph has a memorable quote, grea tinsight into female psyche by a bloke.
Published 3 months ago by Amazon Customer

versus
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bad kindle copy
so many spelling mistakes, please don't bother downloading this.. I had to ding the book for free in other place online and I read it from there..
Published 19 months ago by Roxana


Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bad kindle copy, 13 Dec 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
so many spelling mistakes, please don't bother downloading this.. I had to ding the book for free in other place online and I read it from there..
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars fabuleux, 17 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
possibly the greatest novel ever written, every paragraph has a memorable quote, grea tinsight into female psyche by a bloke.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bravo Madame!, 16 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A superb novel - brilliantly written, of course - beautifully and thoughtfully presented. Excellent Chapter Headings and paragraphs separation : a pleasure for the eye. The content hardly needs another review, as generations have rightly revered this astoundingly incisive study of disillusionment and disappointed love, No one has said it better than Clemenceau, "Le meilleur moment de l'amour, c'est quand on grimpe l'escalier" (The best moment of love is climbing the stairs) ; this may well apply to all life's endeavours ; the maturing process delivers the ability to be reconciled with that devastating fact ; Emma Bovary remains a child-like innocent, fooled by her naivety and - tragically - by the remorseless cunning of those who covet her physical attributes, some dismissing them even before acquiring them ; as one of her lovers muses in the same breath : "I'll have her, but how will I get rid of her ?" No character escapes Flaubert unforgiving gaze : even Emma's pathetic husband - blameless in all other respects, receives from the fates the punishment his hubris brings upon his head. Put Madame Bovary down at your peril ... she will haunt you until you have fully consumed the book!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Masterpiece, 23 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Not for me to pass judgement on who amy be the best ever French novelist. I had read this book for the first time many yeras ago, but really enjoyed greatly this digital edition.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dated Period Piece or Classic Tragedy?, 6 Sep 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Depending on your perspective, this book is hopelessly dated and has little relevance to today, is an important step forward in the French novel, or is a classic depiction of tragedy in the Greek tradition. You should decide which perspective is most meaningful to you in determining whether you should read the book or not.
The story of the younger Madame Bovary (her mother-in-law is the other) is presented in the context of people whose illusions exceed their reality. Eventually, reality catches up with them. In the case of Emma Bovary, these illusions are mostly tied up in the notion that romantic relationships will make life wonderful and that love conquers all. She meets a young doctor of limited potential and marries with little thought. Soon, she finds him unbearable. The only time she is happy is when the two attend a ball at a chateaux put on by some of the nobility (the beautiful people of that time). She has a crisis of spirit and becomes depressed. To help, he moves to another town where life may be better for her. She has a daughter, but takes no interest in her. Other men attract her, and she falls for each one who pays attention to her in a romantic style. Clearly, she is in love with romance. Adultery is not rewarded, and she has a breakdown when one lover leaves her. Recovering, she takes on a younger lover she can dominate. This, too, works badly and she becomes reckless in her pursuit of pleasure. In the process, she takes to being reckless in other ways and brings financial ruin to herself and her family. The book ends in tragedy.
Here is the case for this being dated and irrelevant for today. A modern woman would usually not be trapped in such a way. She would separate from or divorce the husband she grew to detest, and make a new life. She would be able to earn a decent living, and would not be discouraged from raising a child alone. So the story would probably not happen now. In addition, the psychological aspects of her dilemma would be portrayed in terms of an inner struggle reflecting our knowledge today of psychology, rather than as a visual struggle followed mostly by a camera lens in this novel. The third difference is that the shallow stultifying people exalted by the society would be of little interest today. You find few novels about boring people in small towns in rural areas.
The case for the book as important in French literature is varied. The writing is very fine, and will continue to attract those who love the French language forever. This is a rare novel for its day in that it focused on a heroine who was neither noble by class nor noble in spirit. The book clearly makes more of an exploration into psychology than all but a few earlier French novels. The story itself was a shocking one in its day, for its focus on immoral behavior and the author's failure to overtly condemn that behavior. Emma pays the price, as Hollywood would require, but there is no sermonizing against her. So this book is a breakthrough in the modern novel in its shift in focus and tone to a personal pedestrian level.
From a third perspective, this book is a modern update of the classic Green tragedy in which all-too human characters struggle against a remorseless fate and are destroyed in the process. But we see their humanity and are moved by it. Emma's character is a hopeless romantic is established early. To be a hopeless romantic in a world where no one else she meets is condemns her to disappointment. She also seems to have some form of mental illness that makes it hard for her to deal with setbacks. But her optimism that somehow things will work out makes her appealing to us, and makes us wish for her success. When she does not succeed, we grieve with her family. Flaubert makes many references to fate in the novel, so it seems likely that this reading was intended.
My own view is that the modern reader who is not a scholar of French literature can only enjoy this book from the third perspective. If you do, there are many subtle ironies relative to the times and places in the novel that you will appreciate, as well. The ultimate ascendence of the careful, unimaginative pharmacist provides many of these. The ultimate fate of Madame Bovary's daughter, Berthe, is another. Be sure to look for these ironies among the details of these prosaic lives. The book positively teems with them.
If you are interested in perspectives two or three, I suggest you read and savor this fine classic. If you want something that keeps pace with modern times, manners, mores and knowledge, avoid this book!
If you do decide to read Madame Bovary, after you are done be sure to consider in what elements of your life you are filled with illusions that do not correspond to reality. We all have vague hopes that "when" we have "it" (whatever "it" is), life will be perfect. These illusions are often doomed to be shattered. Let your joy come from the seeking of worthy goals, instead! What worthy goals speak deeply into your heart and mind? In this way, you can overcome the misconceptions that stall your personal progress.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A new look, 6 May 2013
By 
Mrs. A. C. Hussey (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I decided to read this in French to improve my French and find I much prefer it in its "home" language . This may be because I'm reading it more slowly & thoughtfully but, I suspect, it's also because there are subtleties that are lost in translation. It has a HUGE introduction but, no doubt in future, I'll read that too!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An old favourite., 4 Oct 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I first read this novel when I was studying French at university and decided I would read it again now forty years later. It had lost none of its power and my own maturity enabled me to comprehend it in a way I had not as a teenager. I am not going to summarise this novel as I assume that most people reading this will be doing so as they are studying French and this will be a set text. All I would say is that, although it was written in the nineteenth century and obviously women's lives have changed a great deal since then, there are nonetheless resonances in today's society. Emma Bovary's dissatisfaction with the mundanity of everyday life in rural France and her unattainable dreams of romance and living in high society are echoed in the unrealistic aspirations of young women in our own time who pore over magazines showing impossibly thin air-brushed models and handbags that cost as much as a car. We also see in M. Lheureux the beginnings of easy credit leading to unpayable debts which eventually lead Emma like so many of our contemporaries to despair. The terrible effects of Emma's behaviour on her family are echoed in our own time too.
There are, of course, lengthy discussions about medical science and religion which are dated in our time and some of the references to the theatre are no longer relevant to modern readers. However, the overall message retains its impact and universality.
Finally, it is a real asset that we can read such classics for free on Kindle. Books were a major expense when I was a student! There are a few typographical errors, however, but these do not detract from the pleasure of reading this great novel.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 35 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Oops it's in French, 11 Mar 2009
By 
L. Thorp - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Reading the in depth customer reviews for this book, meant that I missed the fact that this edition is in French, not English.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Madame Bovary
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (Mass Market Paperback - 7 Aug 2006)
2.40
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews