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on 16 February 2012
This is a perfect powerful yet pocketsized introduction to Japanese aesthetics.As the author explains the style of the book will be free flowing yet with a definite goal in mind:that being an explanation of many elusive and unique japanese concepts.
This 'small' book in my opinion gives the finest poetic explanation of the term wabi-sabi you can find,other writers tend to get mired in newage piffle or minimalist nonsense.Very nice explanation of MONO NO AWARE-that certain sadness of things.I could not recomend it more highly.
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on 22 March 2014
I loved reading this book or maybe I should say I love doing it, since I am reading it again. It is becoming one of my favourite reference books that are also a delight to read. The structure in which this Tractate was written, following the Japanese rules of Zuhitsu, is an art practice in itself. And the analysis of Japanese aesthetics vs. our Western artistic values is very enlightening and inspiring. It is a book that is easy to read though the concepts presented may take some time to comprehend in depth, since they belong to an entirely different culture. Along with 'Wabi-sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers' by Leonard Koren and 'In Praise of Shadows' by Jun'ichirō Tanizaki, I recommend this book to every reader as an introduction to Japanese and Oriental artistic and ethical principles.
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on 1 January 2013
I bought this as part of my research on a Fine Art dissertation about differing Japanese attitudes to perfection and permanence as evidenced in art and artefacts.

It proved very useful. It's short and, despite the forbidding title, not at all hard to read. It has also been set out in an unusual but effective fashion, so that you can read different aspects of the arguments separately if you choose.

I would certainly recommend it to anyone wanting to know more about Japanese aesthetics, wabi-sabi etc.
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on 13 June 2016
I can only assume the guy had spent so long in Japan he his English Grammar got lost along the way. I suspect this book says nothing, but there is no way to be sure.
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on 16 January 2015
A good overview on Japanese culture and aesthetics.
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on 18 November 2008
Concise introduction to Japanese aesthetics.
The author's style may be a little unsettling to begin with, as he attempts to construct it by the automatic writing style of 'the brush'. The narrative is thus a bit disjointed.
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