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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How Sinn Fein and the IRA lost the war.
If you want a flavour of McIntyre's writing,look up his blog (The Pensive Quill)and read on.It has links to a webzine callled " The Blanket",which has most of the articles that comprise this book.
McIntyre did 17 years of a lifer for killing a UVF man,so he can't be accused of being some Johnny-Come-Lately jumping on a bandwagon.His thesis is that the British won...
Published on 27 Feb. 2013 by Franz Bieberkopf

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13 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hypocrisy
I imagine the author is almost certainly correct in describing how republicans were lied to, side-lined and over-ruled by Gerry Adams and his clique as they dragged the IRA and Sinn Fein down the constitutional route, and I can absolutely see how he and other republican traditionalists would feel cheated and betrayed by the peace process, so I have sympathy with him in...
Published on 15 July 2010 by Paul Wilyman


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How Sinn Fein and the IRA lost the war., 27 Feb. 2013
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This review is from: Good Friday: The Death of Irish Republicanism (Paperback)
If you want a flavour of McIntyre's writing,look up his blog (The Pensive Quill)and read on.It has links to a webzine callled " The Blanket",which has most of the articles that comprise this book.
McIntyre did 17 years of a lifer for killing a UVF man,so he can't be accused of being some Johnny-Come-Lately jumping on a bandwagon.His thesis is that the British won the war in Ireland(euphemistically called "The Troubles") that broke out in 1969 and dragged on till the late 1990s.Adams and the SF leadership were right to break away from violence-a useless,morally bankrupt dead end,according to McIntyrte-but wrong to accept partition,the Unionist veto amd a power-sharing Stormont government.From 1994 onwards,the IRA/SF leadership betrayed everything they ever stood for-no united Ireland,no socialist republic,no ceasefire till the Bristish withdrew.
It a good thesis,well argued.Hoiwever,McIntyre does not propose any alternative nto SF republicanism-which he argues is actually Republicans without republicanism..He agrees that a return to violence is pointless,he opposes SF's coalition with the DUP,but McIntyre offers little choice apart from building some hypothetical left/Republican non-violent grassroots opposition to SF.If anyone can see this out there somewhere in Ireland,let me know,because I can see no trace of iot
It's a bit pricey here,so see if you can get it second-hand or out of a library.And remember,most of the articles in this book are somewhere in the "The Blanket" archives online.
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20 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Endgame for the Fenians, 16 Nov. 2008
By 
John L Murphy "Fionnchú" (Los Angeles) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Good Friday: The Death of Irish Republicanism (Paperback)
As an ex-IRA "blanketman," already imprisoned in his teens, interned for 17 years at Long Kesh, Anthony McIntyre knows his subject by having lived most of his life as a volunteer. After prison, he earned a Ph.D. in political science at Queen's. This Belfast native collects various articles and interviews from the past decade or so that list the deathbed rattles and defiant ralliery of Sinn Féin, the IRA, and the stalemated peace process after the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. The chicanery with which this deal was finagled to a rank-and-file previously misled about the continuation of their armed struggle led to McIntyre's break with the "Republican Movement" at least as constituted under the control of Gerry Adams, Martin McGuinness, and their devoted cadre.

Becoming a leading voice for those who disagreed, not for a return to the "physical-force tradition" but a renewal of the ideals which the IRA he and others joined had abandoned, Dr McIntyre combines two rarely encountered areas of expertise. As an insider, he betters the academics and reporters in relating the perspective of an Irish republican who's proven his credibility on the blanket. As a commentator, he's able to silence the "militant Republicans of the verbal type" eager to perch on barstools or boast to the naive their exploits, fueled with Dutch courage.

Admirably given his doctoral competence, McIntyre never lapses into jargon (although "etiology" escaped onto his keyboard once). He avoids sounding sanctimonious or overbearing. He, as with his model Orwell, manages to keep the human dimension within his sustained criticism of the IRA leadership that, for 320 pages, motivates his setting down-- with as much proof as can be summoned against an organization committed to double speak and clandestine councils-- the reasons why one can be principled, yet oppose the GFA packaged as "the peace process." Furthermore, he relates details to us in a calm, wry manner so that any newcomer can clearly understand the participants who support or oppose this intricate strategy.

Chapters cover the GFA, republican dead, The Colombia 3, Decommissioning, the 1981 Hunger Strikers, the supression of dissent, Robert McCartney's murder, informers "Stakeknife" and Denis Donaldson, comrades who speak out against the Adams-McGuinness party line, the dissembling by SF and the IRA in response, the Northern Bank robbery, policing under the PSNI reforms, and the strategic failure of the Republican Movement. Although all are collections of journalism at the time of the events, without the benefit of update or the ease of hindsight, they provide, from one who wrote what he heard and saw and thought in the West Belfast heartland for Gerry Adams of Ballymurphy, a counterspin to the PR machine that dominated so much of the media's attention during the past dozen years in the North of Ireland.

(The author's blog "The Pensive Quill" has information about how to obtain this volume, published by Ausubo Press in NYC.)
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Powerful, 18 Feb. 2010
This review is from: Good Friday: The Death of Irish Republicanism (Paperback)
I don't normally read political books, but after reading a review of this particular book by Irish crime writer, Sam Millar, I went out and bought. A brilliant, totally intriguing book that goes beyond Irish politics, and could be read by anyone looking a page-turner of a read. Full of little gems, but it is the interviews and ordinary voices in the book, make this stand out from the rest. Highly recommended.
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13 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hypocrisy, 15 July 2010
By 
Paul Wilyman (Marlow, Bucks United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Good Friday: The Death of Irish Republicanism (Paperback)
I imagine the author is almost certainly correct in describing how republicans were lied to, side-lined and over-ruled by Gerry Adams and his clique as they dragged the IRA and Sinn Fein down the constitutional route, and I can absolutely see how he and other republican traditionalists would feel cheated and betrayed by the peace process, so I have sympathy with him in that respect.
However this book, a collection of newspaper and magazine articles, is unfortunately chock full of hypocrisy, contradictions, and assertions for which no evidence is provided, which for a man so obviously intelligent and (self) educated is a little unexpected. It is also very repetitive, although that is always a risk where a collection of writings spread over a number of years are read consecutively.
More to the point, the author abjectly fails to provide an alternative. OK, so Gerry Adams and his crew betrayed republicanism. But they've brought peace (or at least more of a peace than the north has enjoyed for a long time, although admittedly only a very, very fragile one). Agreed, they've also brought themselves power and prosperity, sometimes at the expense of their former comrades who suffered so much. But, what would the author have realistically wanted? He maintains the belief that violence would not have solved anything, but makes no suggestion at all as to how peace may have been achieved had Gerry Adams and co not taken the route they did. Someone had to make compromises, someone inevitably had to betray their ideals, and that someone was Gerry Adams.
If he hadn't done what he did, the war would still be on-going, a never-ending unwinnable stalemate, destroying lives, families, neighbourhoods and the entire province.
The author has an understandable right to criticise, and to feel the way he does, but to fill a whole book with this, without a single suggestion of what possible better alternatives were available makes this work no more than a mindless rant that does nothing to aid the peace process or to aid understanding of the history or future of republicanism. Disappointing.
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Good Friday: The Death of Irish Republicanism
Good Friday: The Death of Irish Republicanism by Anthony McIntyre (Paperback - 18 Aug. 2008)
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