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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great book
this book is informative and very interesting,makes you think.this book was bought as used but it looks brand new,very pleased.
Published on 24 Aug. 2011 by craneman

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars In Need of a Good Editor
This could have been a good book, but is so badly put together it actually makes it impossible to read, it needs a really good editor and proof reader, like so many authors of this genre the author attempts to be rather sensationalist and evangelical, I would recommend far better books by John Keel, Jerome Clark et al

Nothing else to say but I would not bother...
Published on 18 Feb. 2011 by R. B. Wood


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars In Need of a Good Editor, 18 Feb. 2011
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R. B. Wood - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Stalking the Tricksters: Shapeshifters, Skinwalkers, Dark Adepts and 2012 (Paperback)
This could have been a good book, but is so badly put together it actually makes it impossible to read, it needs a really good editor and proof reader, like so many authors of this genre the author attempts to be rather sensationalist and evangelical, I would recommend far better books by John Keel, Jerome Clark et al

Nothing else to say but I would not bother if I were you
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Unclear treatment of an interesting subject, 29 July 2013
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This review is from: Stalking the Tricksters: Shapeshifters, Skinwalkers, Dark Adepts and 2012 (Paperback)
Christopher O'Brien has had a longstanding interest in anomalous phenomena. For some years, he lived in the USA's San Luis Valley (SLV), which runs from south central Colorado into northern New Mexico. The area has played host to strange events, such as cattle mutilations, UFO sightings, and ghostly appearances. O'Brien has discussed this apparent hot spot in previous books (e.g. 'Secrets of the Mysterious Valley', published in 2007).

The SLV is also mentioned in the present book, although it's not the main focus. But to convey some idea of what O'Brien means by the term 'trickster', I'll cite an incident that reportedly occurred there in 1993, after he'd spoken to members of a family, called Sutherland, about a bull of theirs that had been found dead and mutilated some years previously (pp. 69-73). The evening before the carcass was found, in June 1980, they heard a helicopter flying slowly south over their property. Fifteen to 20 minutes later, they heard it again, and it sounded as if it were hovering nearby. They went out to look, and saw it rising from the pasture where the dead bull would be found the next morning. The helicopter was mustard-yellow, looked old-fashioned, and didn't seem to have any markings. It flew back to the north, over their house. The day after his visit to the Sutherlands (i.e. some 13 years after their experience with the strange helicopter), O'Brien was in his dining room, reviewing his interview notes, when he heard, and then saw, a helicopter. It matched what the Sutherlands had seen in 1980! His then girlfriend, the latter's daughter, and some neighbours also apparently saw it. O'Brien made extensive enquiries, but no one seemed to know where it had come from. Furthermore, he was told that such a helicopter would have only a 90-mile range, would be extremely rare, and would be astronomically expensive to fly and maintain. He notes that ever since that experience, he's been absolutely convinced that there's "a trickster energy, or program, that is paranormal in nature and [that] somehow this energy/force/entity is manipulating coincidence and manufacturing synchronicity" (p. 73).

This accords with my view, that many paranormal and UFO-related events may be theatrical displays, orchestrated by a higher intelligence. However, in the main, O'Brien's book doesn't pursue this theme. Instead, it gives much space to identifying 'trickster' traits in mythological beings, in supposedly paranormal entities (the Jinni or Djinni of Islamic culture, the skinwalkers of Native American culture, the fairies of Celtic culture, etc.), and in humans (witches, occultists, etc.). But with regard to advancing our understanding of the paranormal, I believe that O'Brien's discussion of mythological entities is largely irrelevant.

The word 'trickster' suggests deception. But O'Brien argues that tricksters can have positive effects. He contends that they are "bringers of change and novelty to culture" (p. 62), although he doesn't explain this very clearly. I found it tedious reading through his list of mythological tricksters, so I resorted to skipping and skimming with that material. As for the book's general thesis, I have to say that I didn't find it very clear. The final chapter struck me as being particularly opaque.

In places, the book contains expressions that aren't familiar to me (e.g. "cultural, front-loaded concept", p. 113; "a cliff note version", p. 130). These terms may be unfamiliar to other readers as well. At points, there's a pretentious flavour to the language in the book, including that in some of the quotations. For example, a passage quoted on p. 4 contains the following vacuous sentence: "These symbols, these essences of pure being, are the primordial qualities of the truly real."

Chapter Five describes some interesting haunting cases, and includes first-hand testimony from O'Brien himself.

Unfortunately, the book lacks an index and contains spelling errors (e.g. on pp. 199-200, 'elicit' is spelt as 'ellicit'). There are also grammatical mistakes. In some passages, there are no spaces between the words; and in places, there are font size irregularities. The book's Table of Contents gives the title of Chapter Four as 'Ghosts and Spirits', but it should be 'Devils and Jinni'; and it gives the title of Chapter Five as 'Devils and Jinni', which should be 'Ghosts and Spirits'. In Chapter Five, O'Brien uses the expression 'crisis apparition' in a questionable way. He describes it as "a spectral figure, force or energy that is witnessed, felt or experienced at the site of a tragedy or crisis" (p. 195). But psychical researchers generally use the term differently: for an experience in which the person depicted by an apparition was undergoing a major crisis around the time of the sighting. For example, a sister might see an apparition of her brother, and then discover that he was fatally injured at the time when she saw his phantom.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great book, 24 Aug. 2011
This review is from: Stalking the Tricksters: Shapeshifters, Skinwalkers, Dark Adepts and 2012 (Paperback)
this book is informative and very interesting,makes you think.this book was bought as used but it looks brand new,very pleased.
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Stalking the Tricksters: Shapeshifters, Skinwalkers, Dark Adepts and 2012
Stalking the Tricksters: Shapeshifters, Skinwalkers, Dark Adepts and 2012 by Christopher O'Brien (Paperback - 17 Sept. 2009)
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