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4.3 out of 5 stars35
4.3 out of 5 stars
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For some reason this critter is a H.P. Lovecraft classic. I have ordered the 2005 movie. I kept waiting for the action and somehow it ended before it started. I did not realize how meaningful the title was until the end where I said "Oh wow now I understand.

After Francis Wayland Thurston (a professor at Brown University), shuffles off this moral coil he leaves papers. His great-nephew an anthropologist who narrates the story is shocked to find France Wayland's research into what started out as a spooky dream to find that he uncovers the cabal of Cthulhu worshipers. But who or what is Cthulhu. We travel with the narrator as he pieces together what Francis was suspecting. When Cthulhu calls we may even have to confront him/it ourselves.
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on 7 August 2015
So I've finally read “The Call of Cthulhu” by H P Lovecraft, mostly because “everyone” (actually two bloggers I follow) mention the Old Ones on a semi-regular basis. One of the bloggers, let's call him Wilcox, believes that Lovecraft's horror stories has captured the real character of the universe, not absolutely literally of course, but definitely in a psychological sense. The other blogger, let's call him Lagrasse, takes Lovecraft as satire and would like to get invited for lunch over at R'lyeh!

My reactions to “The Call of Cthulhu” fall somewhere in between. Living in the cozy welfare state of Sweden, being on holiday and just having imbibed an excellent cup of joe, I can't say that Lovecraft's descriptions of Satanic cults, human sacrifice and alien green octopi scared the living daylights out of me. And yes, the satiric element is obvious. Had I been in a more paranoid state of mind, my reactions might have been very different…

I can understand why “The Call of Cthulhu” is considered a classic of horror fiction. Lovecraft's story is based on a lingering suspicion many people have – the suspicion that the world isn't what it seems to be, that dark, unknown and frankly *evil* forces lurk beneath the horizon, and that these evil forces are actual creatures rather than abstract principles. Above all, Lovecraft taps our fears that evil is stronger than good, that the universe wasn't created by a benign Platonist demiurge or Christian god, and that the real movers and shakers of the cosmos will return soon…unless, of course, they never left in the first place. These fears don't have to be “literal” and might go along just fine with atheism-materialism. Except sometimes. I can't be the only person who sees similarities between Lovecraft's fiction and, say, John Keel's non-fiction. We even have an unconscious purveyor of Cthulhu's satirical dimension in David Icke.

As for the story itself, the appearance of the dread Cthulhu at the end of the novella struck me as a veritable anticlimax, after all the suspense and tension building up to it. The Great Old One comes across as a greener and zanier, but not necessarily creepier, version of that boring monstrosity Moby Dick, and he fails to stop some of the seamen who discovered his island from escaping. Somehow, I get the feeling that a really huge war vessel could destroy this Thing!

So I suppose everything is alright, then.

Or…?
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on 28 November 2011
This fantastic short story is a must for anyone who wants to see what all the fuss is about Lovecraft. I bought this edition as a copy to lend to players of Cthulhu RPG games as a primer on Lovecraftian horror and was amazed at the simple but high-quality printing.

I suggest buying this as a low-cost taster and, if you like what you read, there are some amazing hard-cover anthologies to expand your library.
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on 18 December 2014
A good beginning of the Mythos, but I feel H.P Lovecraft could have made use of more time to develop some settings and make better use of some language to better describe the pictures he wished to project. At the time it may have made more sense to those he spoke with, but I guess it takes more imagination now in our understanding to find a way that makes it easier to relate to.
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on 11 May 2016
Thoroughly enjoying the book but am disappointed by the print. The cover looks nice enough but the paper is thin so that the whole book ends up curved from reading. It is printed by Amazon which it states in small ashamed type at the back but there are layout issues too perverse to have been done by human eyes or at best done without care (at one point the heading of the chapter is at the bottom of the preceding page). Also it seems that the thick border around the pages and the large spacing between paragraphs has been done so as to create the effect of a small novel in size and bump page count rather than for any stylistic reason. The title doesn't get its own page in the book and is followed by a quote and then the first chapter's half paragraph. I feel I could have done a better job with my own printer at home. Disappointed as I paid £5 for the book and had purposefully looked for a version that looked good (what's that old saying..) I see the price has gone down now but would suggest to anyone looking to buy to keep searching.
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For some reason this critter is a H.P. Lovecraft classic. I have ordered the 2005 movie. I kept waiting for the action and somehow it ended before it started. I did not realize how meaningful the title was until the end where I said "Oh wow now I understand.

After Francis Wayland Thurston (a professor at Brown University), shuffles off this moral coil he leaves papers. His great-nephew an anthropologist who narrates the story is shocked to find France Wayland's research into what started out as a spooky dream to find that he uncovers the cabal of Cthulhu worshipers. But who or what is Cthulhu. We travel with the narrator as he pieces together what Francis was suspecting. When Cthulhu calls we may even have to confront him/it ourselves.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
For some reason this critter is a H.P. Lovecraft classic. I have ordered the 2005 movie. I kept waiting for the action and somehow it ended before it started. I did not realize how meaningful the title was until the end where I said "Oh wow now I understand.

After Francis Wayland Thurston (a professor at Brown University), shuffles off this moral coil he leaves papers. His great-nephew an anthropologist who narrates the story is shocked to find France Wayland's research into what started out as a spooky dream to find that he uncovers the cabal of Cthulhu worshipers. But who or what is Cthulhu. We travel with the narrator as he pieces together what Francis was suspecting. When Cthulhu calls we may even have to confront him/it ourselves.
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on 8 May 2013
Had no idea what to expect when i picked this up. I had heard Lovecraft was an under-rated writer but im not really into horror writing so to be honest i wasnt expecting to be blown away. That said, this short story had my heart beating faster and had me glued to it all the way through. i will definitely be recommending it to others and will make sure i read more of his work.
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on 27 December 2013
The Call of Cthulhu was key in launching a plethora of weird tales more than a century ago, so I wanted to read it. To buy it for only 77 pence from Amazon for my Kindle was great. I have since found the same story for free from other online sources, but the Kindle version comes with Kindle's dictionary at the touch of the mouse, bookmarks and note taking facilities.
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on 21 January 2015
Is it me or do Lovecraft's stories always finish when, to my mind, they've just got going?

His scene setting is brilliant and atmospheric, but I was expecting more detail in the descriptions of the subjects pursuit by their nemesis. Still worth a look
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