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4.4 out of 5 stars40
4.4 out of 5 stars
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on 28 September 2013
I rarely take time out of my day to write a review on amazon but I must say this book is well worth picking up, if not for yourself then as a great stocking filler!

I never really gave much thought into the origin of phrases such as 'mad cow disease' or the fact that the scientific term may be something different.

Also love the fact that the language of journalese is never complete. I constantly find myself coming up with new phrases which I will be sure to pass onto Robert Hutton for volume II.

Get buying people.
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on 14 October 2013
"'Coffers' – where organisations of which we disapprove keep their money"

Hutton has cleverly identified the way that newspapers use language (often language never found outside of newspapers) to suit their agenda, and provides an entertaining guide to decoding it. A great book to dive into occasionally, especially when irritated with the media! So always.
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on 29 October 2013
This is simply the funniest book on journalism I've ever read and every journalist should read it.

If you are a journalist or a media studies student, buy it. If you love a journalist, buy it for them. If neither apply, I think it'll still make you laugh - and probably horrify you in places too.

Hutton has a brilliant ear for the language of news and an insider's knowledge of how newspapers work. So this is not just an exhaustive list of journalists' jargon: every definition is funny because it exposes, in our own words, the arcane or hyperbolic vocab we use to turn something into a story.

The book is divided into lots of short sections covering every part of a paper - from crime to the Royals to sport. This makes it very dippable, although I read it straight through in two sittings, thrilled to recognise my tribal language.

Can't recommend it enough.
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on 26 September 2013
Any follower of news is going to instantly resonate with Rob Hutton's brilliant explanation of the language of newspapers.

This is an affectionate book, written by an insider who clearly loves journalism while being highly attuned to its oddities and idiosyncrasies. The result is both illuminating and extremely funny. I laughed out loud on nearly every page.

Highly recommended.
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on 10 October 2013
I cried with laughter at Rob Hutton's best definitions of journalists' words. Romps, Tots and Boffins is very clever and very funny. Enjoy.
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on 14 November 2013
Absolutely fantastic. So so accurate, been waiting ages for a book like this covering something that's irritated me for years.
Brilliant

I certainly wont be jamming any hotlines or launching a foul mouthed tirade!
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on 2 November 2013
Romps, Tots and Boffins is an amusing compendium of journalese, those idiosyncratic words and phrases that seem to only exist within the pages of newspapers and that are often multi-layered with peculiar meaning. Long-term newsman Robert Hutton has collated this excellent tribute to hyperbole and doublethink and there's bound to be something among the collected inanities to make everyone smile. A couple of favourite examples of journalese that I seem to have encountered a lot in this week's papers: "multimillion - what all developments are. Even a scout hut costs a million these days," "hellraiser - male star who 20 years ago could make women faint by taking his shirt off but who now is just a tubby drunk" and "Svengali - reference to an 1894 novel and a 1931 film. Now always preceded by `pop' and followed by `Simon Cowell'. It means, to those to whom it means anything, someone like Simon Cowell."
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VINE VOICEon 26 January 2014
What a great little book - if you are a regular reader of any British newspaper (not just the tabloids) you'll find yourself hooting with laughter at the accuracy of its observations. Well done Rob Hutton; a clever and original idea, beautifully executed.
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on 16 November 2013
This is a very well-written and interesting book. I'm an ex-journalist and so it had a very special significance for me.
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on 3 December 2013
Loved this witty,revealing little book. Wish it was longer. This book is not for reading in one go, it would be over and done with in no time. Dip in and out, go back to it, read that bit again. A perfect bog book.

Clever Mr Hutton, lets have another.
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