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Life After the State
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 26 November 2013
If Dominic Frisby was as good a comedian as he is a writer and thinker, then he would filling arenas but I worry that a proportion of his audience will not like what he has to say. By his own admission, the author is no financial 'expert' - but let us not forget how many of the 'experts' foresaw the financial meltdown of 2007? Gordon Brown anyone, lionising the City of London just ahead of the crash! But the author has researched and read and studied a great deal to be able to put such a book together and more power to him. It is a book with a moral spine, arguing for fairness for all and to be delivered by the people and for the people. This is a viewpoint that I arrived at long ago but not through any research on my part but more by instinct. And so this book then was something of a joy; crystallising much of arguments that I have tried to express myself. And so frustrating now when I try to discuss its merits with friends and find myself doing it no justice at all and resorting to a rather pathetic, 'you'll just have to read it yourself.'
With politicians telling us that a recovery is underway. With interest rates artificially low, with house prices chasing ever higher, money printing with abandon and a DOW and FTSE breaking all records - this is an important book at a crucial time. Politicians should read it but I suspect that they will not. The central message is wealth and prosperity for all at the expense of those who rule and regulate.
Congratulations Dominic and thank you.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 27 December 2013
This is a handy little book that makes the case for a UK whose economy is based on free enterprise, rather than the current crony capitalism that so many mistake for free market economics.

To those of us who who are familiar with the work of the Mises Institute and Lew Rockwell, there will not be too many ideas that are really new here, but what makes Frisby's book worth reading is that he applies these Austrian ideas to the UK, backed by some interesting data and taking on some of the UK's most notorious sacred cows like the disfunctional NHS in the process. This is something that far too few UK writers have attempted.

Along the way he convincingly demonstrates how welfare entrenches and spreads the very poverty it is supposed to relieve, and how fiat money and central banking enrich unproductive elite groups at the expense of the productive economy. He also shows how this money-out-of-thin-air system is an essential ingredient of the modern warfare state.

Frisby's style is easy to read yet never condescending and the book is hard to put down once you get going; I wouldn't be surprised if many people who buy this book will read it in one sitting.

If I absolutely had to make one criticism of this book, it would only be to say that the author has not mapped out an escape route from the UK's version of the welfrae-warfare state. Prospects for this happening politically seem quite dim at present, given the UK's one-party LibLabCon system, where practically all significant politicians parrot the statist mantra (it is after all a very profitable one for them).

Perhaps the best that can be expected is that the system will eventually collapse under its own weight - something which, unlike most of the goals it sets for itself, it seems eminently capable of achieving.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
on 21 November 2013
An eminently readable book - exposing the destructive nature of socialism and the client state. Frisby correctly makes a clear distinction between the free market (true capitalism) and "crony capitalism" - that situation we presently have in the Western World where we, the taxpayers live by the rules of the free-market but the banksters, many politicians, and large corporations do not - they are subsidised by us, the hard-working, honest tax-payers.

A great advantage Frisby has is that he is not a formally educated economist, yet he is well-read on the reality of the subject and is clearly intelligent. This makes for an easily understandable and widely informative work.

There are four parts to the book: 1) The Rise of the Monster (excess government / the state); 2) Money and Tax: Why You'll Never Be One of the 1%; 3) Pillars of the State (NHS / "Education" / etc); 4) Towards life after the State. They (all 4 parts) are most interesting and informative.

The most profound (short) paragraph in the book (to me) is on page 91 and reads thus: "It is government control of money that makes these wars possible. 'Without the money-counterfeiting tool of government,' wrote American economist E.C. Riegel in 1949, 'there could be no war except by popular mandate, because the price would have to be consciously and immediately paid. The would-be war-maker first of all conquers and subdues his own people by the narcotic of counterfeit money. If the people would hold the veto power of war, they must deny to their government the power to counterfeit money'. "

This work is revelatory and is essential reading - I wish I had had it available as a young man. I have given copies to each of my children (over 16) and hope they read it - it will make life so much more understandable to them - and thus give them greater direction in life.

A great book. If it has one fault it is that Frisby is too easy on the "elite". He does not define who they are, EXACTLY. Neither does he expose the scam of PRIVATE central banks controlling interest rates and the issuance of money. I know some of you say that our BoE is publicly owned - it is not - it is a scam - it is really controlled by a certain elite - just as The Fed, The ECB, The IMF, The BIS are. Have no doubt about that. I leave you with one question (that Frisby did not really address): why is it, if we do indeed own the BoE, why is it that we are shackled by interest payments to this body. Why don't we just cancel the debt to ourselves? Just like Iceland did - successfully - but the banker-controlled mainstream media do not want you know about that, do they. Hmmmmmmmmm....?
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on 19 November 2013
I rather enjoyed this book. Libertarianism hasn't had much traction in the UK in the last fifty years or so - and the British author realises this and therefore how some of these ideas sound to many not used to these ideas. Therefore the book is written with the sceptic in mind. He readily acknowledges that those on the Left are trying to help people too, rather than calling them names, which doesn't get us anywhere. Instead, he carefully argues that the solution to many of society's ills is radically decreasing the state rather than tinkering with the existing status quo. In my opinion, his case is persuasive. He doesn't claim to have all the answers, or everything worked out down to the last detail, but he does demonstrate how sleight of hands by governments, especially with money and currency, has widened and entrenched the gap between Rich and Poor - which was the very think it was elected to prevent. Some will naturally hate the very idea of this book and therefore give it a poor review on that basis, which is a pity because if all political discourse were conducted in the tone of this book, things would be a lot more pleasant.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 25 November 2013
'We are where we are' and Life After the State examines where we have come from, how we arrived here and charts a route out of the bourgeoning serfdom we increasingly seem destined for.

Dominic Frisby disambiguates the complex interplay inherent in our democratic, consumer-driven and growth obsessed world, in a tone which is clear, honest and arguably difficult for an acclaimed economist to mimic. His book objectively examines how human nature left to its own devices has proven to be a powerful force for good and contends how a well-intended bureaucracy, combined with a fiat monetary system, unintentionally or otherwise, stifles self reliance, encourages excess debt, causes prices to inflate and capital to be misallocated. The implications for education, healthcare, enterprise and thereby the general well being of society are clearly profound.

This book tells it like it is; suitably free from vested interests, cronyism or state subsidy.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 27 November 2013
Long have I felt that the 'system' that is forced upon us simply doesn't work. It is inefficient, self-serving and corrupt. The situation is steadily getting worse as taxpayers are forced by Government to support 'rent-takers' and 'zombie' organisations. This book is thought provoking and eye opening, and should be read by all. I truly hope that it starts to make a difference.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 26 November 2013
An interesting and informative book that educates and amuses at the same time. Well worth a read. The book contains many references and is well researched. I may have to read it through twice just to take it all in.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 18 November 2013
We all know that the world is going to hell in a handbasket but we feel pretty powerless about it, not least because so much is wrong that we are at a loss to know what needs doing to put it right. The singular achievement of this book is to cut through all this confusion and bring the situation into sharp focus. Frisby explains how the printing of money by banks and governments is at the root of many of our problems because it allows them to surreptitiously steal the wealth of ordinary citizens. He astutely observes that without this they wouldn't be able to afford wars. The main aspects of state activity such as taxation, healthcare, social security and education all come under scrutiny and are shown to be unfair, wasteful and unsatisfactory. It's one thing to criticise, but Frisby also comes up with some solutions that may seem radical at first, but he manages to be persuasive for the most part. He's not advocating us forgoing all the things currently done by government, but rather having the useful things done by private enterprise and community, which he argues are far more effective, efficient and responsive. It might sound like Tory propaganda but he makes a very convincing case for anyone open-minded enough to put politics aside and hear him out. This is a well-researched and referenced work, and despite its radical thesis deserves to have a place alongside other serious books on economics and politics. Unlike many of them though, it is readable, entertaining and inspiring. I would even go as far as to say this is a book that could change the world.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 7 December 2013
This is a really fascinating book. It should appeal to anyone who has faith in individual enterprise and suspicion of Government intervention. It is packed with vivid examples of how we could do better, if the State did less.

There are inspiring examples, from all over the World, of what people can achieve if they are left to their own devices.

Normally these sort of books can be a bit dry but this one is written in flowing language which is both easy to read and difficult to put down.

I read it on Kindle and immediately ordered hard copies for members of my family.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 9 February 2014
Dominic highlights what is wrong with the state beautifully. He shows that without state intervention humans get on fine and in many cases thrive. I will be sending copies to some of my statist friends as this book says how I feel about so many aspects of our broken system.
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