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4.0 out of 5 stars Dustfinger must face his arch enemy... FINGERPOLISH! (Just kidding).
I've literally JUST finished this book, and thought of it as a worthy end to the INKHEART trilogy.
I thought it was very good, but for some reason i can't push it past that. It wasnt amazing, but it was enjoyable all the same and definitley worth reading!

INKHEART was good. INKSPELL was better. INKDEATH is by far the best. Despite the lenght of the book,...
Published on 4 Sept. 2011 by Britishwotsit

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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointed, sorry
I was 12 or 13 when I first found myself between the pages of Inkheart. I was taken directly into a world that was immediately believable, realistic, and completely original. I eagerly anticipated the release of Inkspell after hearing that Inkheart was the first in a trilogy, and I wasn't disappointed.

However, when I read Inkdeath, I found myself frustrated...
Published on 2 Feb. 2009


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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointed, sorry, 2 Feb. 2009
A Kid's Review
I was 12 or 13 when I first found myself between the pages of Inkheart. I was taken directly into a world that was immediately believable, realistic, and completely original. I eagerly anticipated the release of Inkspell after hearing that Inkheart was the first in a trilogy, and I wasn't disappointed.

However, when I read Inkdeath, I found myself frustrated and annoyed with the direction that the storyline had gone. Although the first and second installments seemed to blend together almost perfectly, I felt as I was reading Inkdeath that it was less believable, realistic, and original. Firstly, I took me several chapters to get myself immersed into the events - I thought the initial few chapters were tedious, less flowing, almost as if the author had written the first two books in one single fluid sitting, but then had a long break before writing the third, and had forgotten what she had been writing about before. I felt that the frayed ends of Inkspell, the second book, had been clumsily, almost hastily glued onto the new threads of the third book Inkdeath.

I confess that although I did enjoy reading the book, I did not find it as pleasurable and ulitmately gripping as i found its two predecessors. I think it was a terrible mistake to eliminate Basta, as he's one of those charcters you love to hate. I didn't realise how much I missed him and his peppermint breath until I opened Inkdeath, and realised he was missing, missing, missing. It was like Silence of the Lambs without Hannibal, 1984 without Big Brother, Star Wars without Darth Vader. One of my main disappointments, however, concerned the Black Prince. In Inkspell, he was a charming, wondrous character with a personality as sharp as his throwing knives; but I was annoyed that in Inkdeath, he seemed to disappear completely, becoming nothing more than a dark figure in the distance, and less the prominent character he was in Inkspell. He barely featured at all in most chapters, other than to be relentlessly beaten and battered. And why even, would anyone in the story attempt to murder a character who seems to be weak in substance anyway? I got the impression that he was nothing more than a puppet figure, but with strings missing, or just a name on a page. I felt the same with Meggie too. In the first two books, she seemed to play the central role as a strong protagonist, similar to Lyra in "His Dark Materials" with that same mixture of vulnerability and strength, yet in this book it was her father, Mo, and his swinging sword that seemed to feature most.

I think most of my negative responses could be because I read Inkheart 4 years ago, but now I'm 16, and it did feel as if I was stepping into a children's book; this is probably why I criticised it so much when i was reading it because I think perhaps I've suddenly become to old for it. However, I do think it's a shame that either I have grown up too much to appreciate this book, or that somehow the original magic has been lost in the weaving of this final book. I'm more sad than annoyed that this book has happened. But to be honest, despite my age, or my opinions, I'd give anything for Cornelia Funke to rewrite this whole book again, take out the pointless subplots and the cliched, banal ending which I have read so many times before, and place more emphasis on already amazing existing characters rather than shoving in new ones. I'll give it a second chance if she does.
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36 of 41 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing., 27 Oct. 2008
By 
KT (Gloucestershire) - See all my reviews
After reading Inkheart and Inkspell, I was really hoping for great things from Inkdeath. A climatic finish and a proper resolution to the great stories started in the previous books.

What I got however, was a tedious and badly written book. In fact, I struggled to finish it - if I hadn't got a policy of always finishing books I start, I probably would have put it down and stopped reading. There is a startling lack of plot throughout the majority of the book, just tedious meanderings, before Funke suddenly rushes into a climax and throws all the action into about 5% of the novel, leaving many subplots and ideas she started finished with sometimes only a sentence - if they are remembered at all. And even then, I'd been so turned off by the rest of the novel that I found I had trouble caring. There are weird touches to the plot as well, which would be better off in a different story - for example, one character starts turning into a bird and finds it hard to remember their human self, again another plot again crammed into those final pages. I just thought: "What?" It didn't fit with the story. It served no plot purpose.

Furthermore, what happened to the characters? Mo becomes the Bluejay for unexplained reasons, and Meggie morphs into a whiny, tragic, wet blanket who doesn't do much at all. Farid - what Funke did to Farid was criminal. Instead of just being a boy who has an adoration of Dustfinger which he could probably move past with a little maturity, Farid is penalised by Funke for this adoration and he becomes almost a bad character. Certainly his ending implies this. And the introduction of Doria - I have rarely read about a more 1D character than Doria. Truly terrible. The rest of the cast fared not much better, the villains with contradictory personalities, the 'good guys' becoming wooden and bland, and hurriedly resolved plotlines. Violante loves the Bluejay? Well, no problem - after drawing out this problem for the entirity of the book, let's solve it by writing one little sentence somewhere in the last chapter about how she might fall for someone else.

I'm also unsure about the ending. I'd have to think about that more, if I felt the book was worth my time. However, I think I owe it to Cornelia Funke, Inkheart and all its wonderful characters to ignore Inkdeath, and pretend the story stops with Inkspell. Because they didn't deserve what happened in Inkdeath.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 4 Sept. 2009
By 
M. K. Burton - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
It's a struggle to summarize this book because there are so many plot threads running through it. Dustfinger is still dead and Farid is determined to revive him, even if it requires working with the oily Orpheus. Mo becomes more and more like the Bluejay and not like the bookbinder he originally was. Resa becomes increasingly intent on returning to the real world. Elinor begins to hate her life among her books when she could be living in one. And Meggie? She's still in love with Farid and mainly, very confused.

Like I said, there are almost too many plot threads running through this. It had been a while since the first two for me so it took me a good few pages to recall what was actually going on, let alone figure out who everyone was again. After that, the book dragged. I dreaded Elinor's chapters in particular. The woman sat around complaining for a few pages each time until she finally got placed into the story, at which point she nearly vanished in the barrage of other characters. What was the point there? Meanwhile, Meggie, the supposed main character of this entire series, is relegated to the sidelines where her main focus is weeping about her father and worrying about who she actually loves. I read one professional review that said that while Cornelia Funke is actually a great storyteller, the books have lost their original focus. I agree with that.

That said, this book is still a great story once you get halfway into it, and it wraps up in a very satisfying way. I enjoyed the ending very much and I didn't regret reading it or anything like that. I just didn't quite get what I bargained for, and I can see the merit in wishing the story had ended with Inkheart. I think, however, that the series is still worth reading. It just has a few slow spots in the middle and I'm not sure it will keep a child's interest. It did keep mine, though.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't get into it..., 14 Jan. 2012
I really enjoyed Inkheart, and found myself becoming slightly obsessed with the series. Reading Inkspell, I thought that book was quite good too, although not as good as book 1. But, although I borrowed Inkdeath a few months ago from a friend, I still haven't anywhere near finished it. I will at some point, but I just can't get into it. Everything happens so slowly and the characters are suddenly so dull that I really can't be bothered to read on and find out what happens to them. Often when I read a book I find myself really thinking about how a character is feeling and thinking, 'I wish I could be that character,' but in Inkdeath I find that I don't really care about them, which is even worse because the first book started the series so well.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Dustfinger must face his arch enemy... FINGERPOLISH! (Just kidding)., 4 Sept. 2011
By 
Britishwotsit (ENGLAND, SUSSEX) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I've literally JUST finished this book, and thought of it as a worthy end to the INKHEART trilogy.
I thought it was very good, but for some reason i can't push it past that. It wasnt amazing, but it was enjoyable all the same and definitley worth reading!

INKHEART was good. INKSPELL was better. INKDEATH is by far the best. Despite the lenght of the book, it is fast moving and never failed to lose my interest.
The ending was worth waiting for, although dragged out just a small bit more than it had to be (which probably made it more realistic, as realistic as a fantasy book can go anyway).

The only thing that i thought bad of about this book, was the romance between Meggie and Farid. Obviously this isnt a key part of the book, and the author never mentions it too much because the story is more important but...I really can't say too much in fear of spoiling the ending, but after the ending of Inkspell, you would have thought that Farid and Meggie were inseperable. Thats ALL im saying there.

Overall, good book. Nicely developed characters, and a world that the author has made beleivable through her unique, artistic writing
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3.0 out of 5 stars Slightly disappointed, 30 Jun. 2013
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I thought this book was quite disappointing compared to the first two books of the ink trilogy because Cornelia Funke missed out quite a few important places & characters. I thought that the most disappointing bit was that Dustfinger (who I thought was a very well created character) was dead for most of the book and only came back at the very end of the story. Also I found that Orpheus was wrote about much to often and was made to look much more important than Meggie even though she was the most important character in Inkheart. I also thought it was strange that Basta had died because in Inkheart Cornelia made him one of the Ink trilogy's most important villains. The thing I liked about the book was that it was mysterious and Resa played a more important part and her feelings were explained more clearly.
I also find the fact that Mo turns into the Bluejay is quite disappointing because I thought he was a better character as a bookbinder rather than a soft hearted robber who is the adderhead's enemy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The darkest and most dangerous book in the Trilogy., 14 Mar. 2011
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I absolutely love this trilogy. For me the world created by Cornelia Funke is like Enid Blyton meets Arthur Rackham. This is the darkest and most dangerous of the books and the characters really develop and change due to their experiences in the Inkworld, especially Mo. It is a highly imaginative, richly detailed world with such fabulous characters that you can't help but keep thinking about it long after you have finished reading the books. I don't know why there are such negative reviews by some as this was my favourite book but maybe it is the way the characters change that people don't like but for me that is what makes it so fascinating and shocking. I was really looking forward to the Inkheart film but it was too twee and sickly for my liking. Read the books though - they are superb.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Loved the ending! Fans of the first will love the last too!, 9 Mar. 2012
This review is from: Inkdeath (Inkheart Trilogy) (Paperback)
I picked up Funke's trilogy as an adult, however, I think that I have received much enjoyment from them, and particularly the last book, is very dark and disturbing. It follows on closely from "Inkspell", and whilst is somewhat slow (not like "Inkspell") I think the reader will appreciate the wait and the build-up to the finale.

I must admit, there are some particularly harrowing scenes which as an adult, have left an impression on me, so this may not totally be appropriate for very young readers, I won't give any spoilers, but there is more blood - so not for the squemish either!

Overall, I loved the conclusion to the triology, and I think if you stuck through the second book, you will thoroughly enjoy this.
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4.0 out of 5 stars great book... only the ending, 9 Aug. 2013
The better part of the content is similar to inkheart and inkspell,only a few bits are wrong: The transformation of kind,gentle mo into a vicious,profilic robber is ridicule. In inkspell,Farid and meggie are madly in love,which makes the introduction of doria,who falls in love with meggie,stupid.It leaves so many vital and unanwered questions.What happenes with farid?does dustfinger go with him? The ending is rushed.Do the folcharts stay in inkworld?what happens to Orpheus?and does doria stay with meggie?
Still the plot with the adderhead is facinating!He's a great character.read it its quire good.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 100% worth it, 13 Oct. 2008
By 
Kath (Berkshire, England) - See all my reviews
I have to say, it was absolutely fantastic. I loved every moment of reading it, but I found the ending disappointing, not because it was poorly written but because the book was just so great I was sad it was the end.

Definetly buy it, you won't regret it.
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Inkdeath (Inkheart Trilogy)
Inkdeath (Inkheart Trilogy) by Cornelia Funke (Paperback - 4 Aug. 2011)
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